What does sickle mean?

Definitions for sickle
ˈsɪk əlsick·le

This dictionary definitions page includes all the possible meanings, example usage and translations of the word sickle.

Princeton's WordNet

  1. sickle, reaping hook, reap hooknoun

    an edge tool for cutting grass or crops; has a curved blade and a short handle

Wiktionary

  1. sicklenoun

    an implement, having a semicircular blade and short handle, used for cutting long grass and cereal crops

  2. sickleverb

    To cut with a sickle

  3. sickleverb

    To deform (as with a red blood cell) into an abnormal crescent shape.

  4. sickleverb

    To assume an abnormal crescent shape. Used of red blood cells.

  5. sickleadjective

    Shaped like the blade of a sickle; crescent-shaped.

    a sickle moon

  6. Etymology: From sicol.

Samuel Johnson's Dictionary

  1. SICKLEnoun

    The hook with which corn is cut; a reaping hook.

    Etymology: sicol , Saxon; sickel, Dutch, from secale, or sicula, Latin.

    God’s harvest is even ready for the sickle, and all the fields yellow long ago. Edmund Spenser, on Ireland.

    Time should never,
    In life or death, their fortunes sever;
    But with his rusty sickle mow
    Both down together at a blow. Hudibras.

    When corn has once felt the sickle, it has no more benefit from the sunshine. Robert South, Sermons.

    O’er whom time gently shakes his wings of down,
    ’Till with his silent sickle they are mown. Dryden.

Wikipedia

  1. Sickle

    A sickle, bagging hook, reaping-hook or grasshook is a single-handed agricultural tool designed with variously curved blades and typically used for harvesting, or reaping, grain crops or cutting succulent forage chiefly for feeding livestock, either freshly cut or dried as hay. Falx was a synonym but was later used to mean any of a number of tools that had a curved blade that was sharp on the inside edge such as a scythe. Since the beginning of the Iron Age hundreds of region-specific variants of the sickle have evolved, initially of iron and later steel. This great diversity of sickle types across many cultures can be divided into smooth or serrated blades, both of which can be used for cutting either green grass or mature cereals using slightly different techniques. The serrated blade that originated in prehistoric sickles still dominates in the reaping of grain and is even found in modern grain-harvesting machines and in some kitchen knives.

ChatGPT

  1. sickle

    A sickle is a hand-held agricultural tool with a curved blade typically used for harvesting grain crops or cutting grass. It has been used since ancient times and is often associated with traditional farming practices.

Webster Dictionary

  1. Sicklenoun

    a reaping instrument consisting of a steel blade curved into the form of a hook, and having a handle fitted on a tang. The sickle has one side of the blade notched, so as always to sharpen with a serrated edge. Cf. Reaping hook, under Reap

  2. Sicklenoun

    a group of stars in the constellation Leo. See Illust. of Leo

  3. Etymology: [OE. sikel, AS. sicol; akin to D. sikkel, G. sichel, OHG. sihhila, Dan. segel, segl, L. secula, fr. secare to cut; or perhaps from L. secula. See Saw a cutting instrument.]

Wikidata

  1. Sickle

    A sickle is a hand-held agricultural tool with a variously curved blade typically used for harvesting grain crops or cutting succulent forage chiefly for feeding livestock. The diversity of sickles that have been used around the globe is staggering. Between the dawn of the Iron Age and present, hundreds of region-specific variants of this basic forage-cutting tool were forged of iron, later steel. Within the industrial set-up, when the trip hammer took over from men swinging their strong arms at the anvil some models of sickles were produced in up to six different sizes. One noteworthy feature of sickles is that their edges have been made in two very distinct manners/patterns - smooth or serrated. While both can be used for cutting either green grass or mature cereals, it is the serrated sickle that still dominates the duty of harvesting grain - with other words the "reaping". Modern kitchen knives with serrated edges, as well as grain-harvesting machines use the same design principle as prehistoric sickles.

Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

  1. Sickle

    sik′l, n. a hooked instrument for cutting grain.—n. Sic′kle-bill, a name applied to various birds with sickle-shaped bill.—adj. Sic′kled, bearing a sickle.—ns. Sic′kle-feath′er, one of the sickle-shaped middle feathers of the domestic cock; Sic′kleman, one who uses a sickle, a reaper.—adj. Sic′kle-shaped.—n. Sic′kle-wort, the self-heal. [A.S. sicol, sicel—L. secula, a sickle—secāre, to cut.]

Surnames Frequency by Census Records

  1. SICKLE

    According to the U.S. Census Bureau, Sickle is ranked #40672 in terms of the most common surnames in America.

    The Sickle surname appeared 537 times in the 2010 census and if you were to sample 100,000 people in the United States, approximately 0 would have the surname Sickle.

    97.2% or 522 total occurrences were White.
    1.3% or 7 total occurrences were Asian.

Matched Categories

How to pronounce sickle?

How to say sickle in sign language?

Numerology

  1. Chaldean Numerology

    The numerical value of sickle in Chaldean Numerology is: 8

  2. Pythagorean Numerology

    The numerical value of sickle in Pythagorean Numerology is: 5

Examples of sickle in a Sentence

  1. Ronit Lupu:

    This discovery represents a highly significant addition to our research of the city and the vicinity. Apart from the pottery, the fascinating flint finds attest to the livelihood of the local population in prehistoric times: Small sickle blades for harvesting cereal crops, chisels and polished axes for building, borers and awls, and even a bead made of carnelian (a gemstone), indicating that jewelry was either made or imported, the grinding tools, mortars and pestles, like the basalt bowl, attest to technological skills as well as to the kinds of crafts practiced in the local community.

  2. Ronit Lupu:

    On completion of the excavations at Shu?fat, it is quite evident that there was a thriving settlement in the Jerusalem area in ancient times. Thousands of years later, the buildings uncovered are of a standard that would not fall short of Jerusalem’s architecture, this discovery represents a highly significant addition to our research of the city and the vicinity. Apart from the pottery, the fascinating flint finds attest to the livelihood of the local population in prehistoric times: Small sickle blades for harvesting cereal crops, chisels and polished axes for building, borers and awls, and even a bead made of carnelian (a gemstone), indicating that jewelry was either made or imported.

Popularity rank by frequency of use

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Translations for sickle

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"sickle." Definitions.net. STANDS4 LLC, 2024. Web. 3 Mar. 2024. <https://www.definitions.net/definition/sickle>.

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