What does outlaw mean?

Definitions for outlaw
ˈaʊtˌlɔout·law

Here are all the possible meanings and translations of the word outlaw.

Princeton's WordNet

  1. criminal, felon, crook, outlaw, malefactoradjective

    someone who has committed a crime or has been legally convicted of a crime

  2. illegitimate, illicit, outlaw(a), outlawed, unlawfuladjective

    contrary to or forbidden by law

    "an illegitimate seizure of power"; "illicit trade"; "an outlaw strike"; "unlawful measures"

  3. lawless, outlaw(a)verb

    disobedient to or defiant of law

    "lawless bands roaming the plains"

  4. outlaw, criminalize, criminalise, illegalize, illegaliseverb

    declare illegal; outlaw

    "Marijuana is criminalized in the U.S."

GCIDE

  1. Outlawnoun

    A person engaging habitually in criminal activity, especially theft or robbery; an habitually lawless person, especially one who is a fugitive from the law.

  2. Outlawverb

    To render illegal; to ban, prohibit, or proscribe under sanction of some penalty.

Wiktionary

  1. outlawnoun

    A fugitive from the law.

  2. outlawnoun

    A person who is excluded from normal legal rights.

  3. outlawnoun

    A person who operates outside established norms.

    The main character of the play was a bit of an outlaw who refused to shake hands or say thank you.

  4. outlawnoun

    A wild horse.

  5. outlawverb

    To declare illegal

  6. outlawverb

    To place a ban upon

  7. outlawverb

    To remove from legal jurisdiction or enforcement.

    to outlaw a debt or claim

  8. outlawverb

    To deprive of legal force.

    Laws outlawed by necessity. uE000133130uE001 Fuller.

Samuel Johnson's Dictionary

  1. Outlawnoun

    One excluded from the benefit of the law. A blunderer; a robber; a bandit.

    Etymology: utlaga , Saxon.

    An outlaw in a castle keeps. William Shakespeare, Hen. VI.

    Gathering unto him all the scatterlings and outlaws out of the woods and mountains, he marched forth into the English pale. Edmund Spenser, on Ireland.

    As long as they were out of the protection of the law; so as every Englishman might kill them, how should they be other than outlaws and enemies to the crown of England? John Davies, on Ireland.

    You may as well spread out the unsun’d heaps
    Of misers treasure by an outlaw’s den, And tell me it is safe, as bid me hope
    Danger will let a helpless maiden pass. John Milton.

    A drunkard is outlawed from all worthy and creditable converse: men abhor, loath, and despise him. South.

  2. To Outlawverb

    To deprive of the benefits and protection of the law.

    I had a son
    Now outlaw’d from my blood; he sought my life. William Shakespeare.

    He that is drunken,
    Is outlaw’d by himself: all kind of ill
    Did with his liquor slide into his veins. George Herbert.

    Like as there are particular persons outlawed and proscribed by civil laws, so are there nations that are outlawed and proscribed by the law of nature and nations. Francis Bacon.

    All those spiritual aids are withdrawn, which should assist him to good, or fortify him against ill; and like an out-lawed person he is exposed to all that will assault him. Decay of Piety.

Wikipedia

  1. Outlaw

    An outlaw, in its original and legal meaning, is a person declared as outside the protection of the law. In pre-modern societies, all legal protection was withdrawn from the criminal, so that anyone was legally empowered to persecute or kill them. Outlawry was thus one of the harshest penalties in the legal system. In early Germanic law, the death penalty is conspicuously absent, and outlawing is the most extreme punishment, presumably amounting to a death sentence in practice. The concept is known from Roman law, as the status of homo sacer, and persisted throughout the Middle Ages. A secondary meaning of outlaw is a person who systematically avoids capture by evasion and violence to deter capture. These meanings are related and overlapping but not necessarily identical. A fugitive who is declared outside protection of law in one jurisdiction but who receives asylum and lives openly and obedient to local laws in another jurisdiction is an outlaw in the first meaning but not the second (example - William Bankes, detailed below). A fugitive who remains formally entitled to a form of trial if captured alive but avoids capture because of high risk of conviction and severe punishment if tried is an outlaw in the second sense but not first (example - Rozsa Sandor, tried and sentenced merely to a term of imprisonment when captured.). In the common law of England, a "writ of outlawry" made the pronouncement Caput lupinum ("Let his be a wolf's head"), equating that person with a wolf in the eyes of the law. Not only was the subject deprived of all legal rights, being outside the "law", but others could kill him on sight as if he were a wolf or other wild animal. Women were declared "waived" rather than outlawed but it was effectively the same punishment.

Freebase

  1. Outlaw

    In historical legal systems, an outlaw is declared as outside the protection of the law. In pre-modern societies, this takes the burden of active prosecution of a criminal from the authorities. Instead, the criminal is withdrawn all legal protection, so that anyone is legally empowered to persecute or kill them. Outlawry was thus one of the harshest penalties in the legal system. In early Germanic law, the death penalty is conspicuously absent, and outlawing is the most extreme punishment, presumably amounting to a death sentence in practice. The concept is known from Roman law, as the status of homo sacer, and persisted throughout the Middle Ages. Outlawry was a principally pre-Magna Carta phenomenon. It was by virtue of Magna Carta that the legal precepts due process and habeas corpus were concurrently established in 1214 thus commencing with their eventual enshrinement in judicial procedures which required that persons suspected of crimes are required to be judged in a court of law before punishment can be legally rendered. However antiquated, forms of outlawry continue to exist. In the common law of England, a "Writ of Outlawry" made the pronouncement Caput gerat lupinum with respect to its subject, using "head" to refer to the entire person and equating that person with a wolf in the eyes of the law: Not only was the subject deprived of all legal rights of the law being outside of the "law", but others could kill him on sight as if he were a wolf or other wild animal. Women were declared "waived" rather than outlawed but it was effectively the same punishment.

Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

  1. Outlaw

    owt′law, n. one deprived of the protection of the law: a robber or bandit.—v.t. to place beyond the law: to deprive of the benefit of the law: to proscribe.—n. Out′lawry, the act of putting a man out of the protection of the law: state of being an outlaw. [A.S. útlaga; cf. Ice. útlágiút, out, lög, law.]

Suggested Resources

  1. outlaw

    Song lyrics by outlaw -- Explore a large variety of song lyrics performed by outlaw on the Lyrics.com website.

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Numerology

  1. Chaldean Numerology

    The numerical value of outlaw in Chaldean Numerology is: 9

  2. Pythagorean Numerology

    The numerical value of outlaw in Pythagorean Numerology is: 2

Examples of outlaw in a Sentence

  1. Jack Kirby:

    If my publisher hadn't said' let's do superhero stories,' I'd probably still be doing' A Kid Called Outlaw,'' The Two-Gun Kid' or' Millie the Model' or whatever I was doing at the time.

  2. Jeanne Shaheen:

    I hope The Supreme Court is listening to the people of the United States, i think if you want to see a revolution go ahead, outlaw Roe v. Wade and see what the response is of the public, particularly young people.

  3. Russ Ingalls:

    Vermont was the first State in the nation to outlaw slavery. It’s already plainly in our Constitution that slavery is not allowed in our state, we have so many more important things to do [than] to defile our old important documents to change words that have already been clearly written. There is not one sane person that could so severely misinterpret the words of our constitution to make it read that Vermonters support slavery in any form. If it were to pass, it would not change anything other than a historic document that was so thoughtfully written over two hundred years ago.

  4. Seth Ferranti:

    He was fearless, he was reckless and he basically didn’t care what anyone else thought and did what he wanted to do, that old street justice, death before dishonor outlaw creed, is still there especially in the criminal underworld and in prison, so stuff like that can catch up to you. It doesn't always catch up to you. But in Alpo’s case, it did.

  5. Joe Biden:

    They have to, for them to make Dobbs—for them to outlaw Roe, outlaw the right of a woman to make a choice with their doctor, to not make exceptions for rape and incest and et cetera, and pass it out of the Congress to make it the law of the land, the president has to sign it. I’ll veto it.

Popularity rank by frequency of use

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Translations for outlaw

From our Multilingual Translation Dictionary

  • حظرArabic
  • Verfemter, Outlaw, Gesetzloser, ächtenGerman
  • παράνομος, φυγάς, αγριάλογοGreek
  • eksterleĝulino, eksterleĝuloEsperanto
  • desperado, fugitivo, forajidoSpanish
  • lainsuojaton, villihevonen, kieltääFinnish
  • hors-la-loiFrench
  • eisreachtúIrish
  • útlægja, útlagiIcelandic
  • fuorileggeItalian
  • 無法者Japanese
  • vogelvrijeDutch
  • fora-de-leiPortuguese
  • persoană fără de lege, fugarRomanian
  • изгна́нница, изго́й, [[дикий, престу́пник, изгна́нник, [[объявля́ть]] [[вне]] [[закон, отверженный, престу́пница, разбо́йница, отве́рженный, разбо́йникRussian
  • odmetnik, razbojnik, izopćenikSerbo-Croatian
  • bannlysa, kriminalisera, fredlösSwedish
  • 取締Chinese

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    having or resembling a stinger or barb
    • A. occlusive
    • B. butch
    • C. aculeate
    • D. proprietary

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