What does emotions mean?

Definitions for emotions
emo·tions

Here are all the possible meanings and translations of the word emotions.


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Wikipedia

  1. emotions

    Emotions are mental states brought on by neurophysiological changes, variously associated with thoughts, feelings, behavioral responses, and a degree of pleasure or displeasure. There is currently no scientific consensus on a definition. Emotions are often intertwined with mood, temperament, personality, disposition, or creativity.Research on emotion has increased over the past two decades with many fields contributing including psychology, medicine, history, sociology of emotions, and computer science. The numerous theories that attempt to explain the origin, function and other aspects of emotions have fostered more intense research on this topic. Current areas of research in the concept of emotion include the development of materials that stimulate and elicit emotion. In addition, PET scans and fMRI scans help study the affective picture processes in the brain.From a mechanistic perspective, emotions can be defined as "a positive or negative experience that is associated with a particular pattern of physiological activity." Emotions produce different physiological, behavioral and cognitive changes. The original role of emotions was to motivate adaptive behaviors that in the past would have contributed to the passing on of genes through survival, reproduction, and kin selection.In some theories, cognition is an important aspect of emotion. Other theories, however, claim that emotion is separate from and can precede cognition. Consciously experiencing an emotion is exhibiting a mental representation of that emotion from a past or hypothetical experience, which is linked back to a content state of pleasure or displeasure. The content states are established by verbal explanations of experiences, describing an internal state.Emotions are complex. There are various theories on the question of whether or not emotions cause changes in our behaviour. On the one hand, the physiology of emotion is closely linked to arousal of the nervous system. Emotion is also linked to behavioral tendency. Extroverted people are more likely to be social and express their emotions, while introverted people are more likely to be more socially withdrawn and conceal their emotions. Emotion is often the driving force behind motivation. On the other hand, emotions are not causal forces but simply syndromes of components, which might include motivation, feeling, behaviour, and physiological changes, but none of these components is the emotion. Nor is the emotion an entity that causes these components.Emotions involve different components, such as subjective experience, cognitive processes, expressive behavior, psychophysiological changes, and instrumental behavior. At one time, academics attempted to identify the emotion with one of the components: William James with a subjective experience, behaviorists with instrumental behavior, psychophysiologists with physiological changes, and so on. More recently, emotion is said to consist of all the components. The different components of emotion are categorized somewhat differently depending on the academic discipline. In psychology and philosophy, emotion typically includes a subjective, conscious experience characterized primarily by psychophysiological expressions, biological reactions, and mental states. A similar multi-componential description of emotion is found in sociology. For example, Peggy Thoits described emotions as involving physiological components, cultural or emotional labels (anger, surprise, etc.), expressive body actions, and the appraisal of situations and contexts. Nowadays most research into emotions in the clinical and well-being context focuses on emotion dynamics in daily life, predominantly the intensity of specific emotions, and their variability, instability, inertia, and differentiation, and whether and how emotions augment or blunt each other over time, and differences in these dynamics between people and along the lifespan.

Freebase

  1. Emotions

    "Emotions" is a hit song written and produced by Mariah Carey, David Cole and Robert Clivillés of the C+C Music Factory, and recorded for Carey's second album of the same name. It was released as the album's first single in the third quarter of 1991 in the United States and in the fourth quarter elsewhere. This disco-influenced song has its protagonist going through a variety of emotions, from high to low, up to the point where she declares "you got me feeling emotions" and sings high notes.

U.S. National Library of Medicine

  1. Emotions

    Those affective states which can be experienced and have arousing and motivational properties.

Editors Contribution

  1. emotions

    Plural form of emotion.

    We naturally express our emotions peacefully when we need to.


    Submitted by MaryC on December 17, 2015  

British National Corpus

  1. Spoken Corpus Frequency

    Rank popularity for the word 'emotions' in Spoken Corpus Frequency: #4606

How to pronounce emotions?

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Numerology

  1. Chaldean Numerology

    The numerical value of emotions in Chaldean Numerology is: 9

  2. Pythagorean Numerology

    The numerical value of emotions in Pythagorean Numerology is: 2

Examples of emotions in a Sentence

  1. Sascha Frühholz:

    Humans share with other species the potential to signal danger when screaming, but it seems like only humans scream to signal also positive emotions like extreme joy and pleasure.

  2. Charles McCarry:

    I was never in the bureaucracy, always in the theater, ive consciously tried not to romanticize anything, especially not intelligence work. Ive always said that Ive been writing a series of episodic, naturalistic novels. The people just happen to be spies, politicians, civil servants. If pediatricians lived lives in which the manipulation of emotions were the tools of the trade, I probably would have written about them.

  3. Erica Reischer:

    Twenty to 30 minutes of extra sleep can really improve children’s mood, ability to manage their emotions and to behave better in challenging situations, sleep is a lot more important than we give it credit for.

  4. Chetan Dube:

    If Amelia is to become the most faithful service agent, she also needs to be able to respond to man’s need to communicate with somebody who can understand emotions—not just a robotic ‘Press 1 for this’ and ‘Press 7 for that,’ amelia’s emotional quotient is modeled in a three-dimensional space: pleasure, arousal, dominance—the PAD modeling system. We are in trials with a telco company, and there is a certain demeanor that Amelia is required to have if your contract is coming up for renewal. Her emotional reaction to you is supposed to be very different based on where you are in the contract or your level of angst with the service.

  5. Kristina Hooper:

    That's the funny thing about the stock market. It's an unusual indicator because it's dominated by emotions, we have to be careful not to assume we're heading into a recession.

Popularity rank by frequency of use

emotions#1#7971#10000

Translations for emotions

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    a widespread outbreak of an infectious disease
    • A. epidemic
    • B. ultimo
    • C. articulate
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