What does Journalism mean?

Definitions for Journalism
ˈdʒɜr nlˌɪz əmJour·nal·ism

Here are all the possible meanings and translations of the word Journalism.

Princeton's WordNet

  1. journalism, news medianoun

    newspapers and magazines collectively

  2. journalismnoun

    the profession of reporting or photographing or editing news stories for one of the media

GCIDE

  1. Journalismnoun

    The branch of knowledge that studies phenomena associated with news collection, distribution, and editing; a course of study, especially in institutions of higher learning, that teaches students how to write, edit, or report news.

    Etymology: [Cf. F. journalisme.]

  2. Journalismnoun

    The periodical collection and publication of current news; the business of managing, editing, or writing for, journals, newspapers, magazines, broadcasting media such as radio or television, or other news media such as distribution over the internet; as, political journalism; broadcast journalism; print journalism.

    Etymology: [Cf. F. journalisme.]

Wiktionary

  1. journalismnoun

    The activity or profession of being a journalist.

    Etymology: From journalisme (beginning of 19th century).

  2. journalismnoun

    The aggregating, writing, editing, and presenting of news or news articles for widespread distribution, typically in periodical print publications and broadcast news media, for the purpose of informing the audience.

    Etymology: From journalisme (beginning of 19th century).

  3. journalismnoun

    The style of writing characteristic of material in periodical print publications and broadcast news media, consisting of direct presentation of facts or events with an attempt to minimize analysis or interpretation.

    Etymology: From journalisme (beginning of 19th century).

Webster Dictionary

  1. Journalismnoun

    the keeping of a journal or diary

    Etymology: [Cf. F. journalisme.]

  2. Journalismnoun

    the periodical collection and publication of current news; the business of managing, editing, or writing for, journals or newspapers; as, political journalism

    Etymology: [Cf. F. journalisme.]

Freebase

  1. Journalism

    Journalism is the activity, or product, of journalists or others engaged in the preparation of written, visual, or audio material intended for dissemination through public media with reference to factual, ongoing events of public concern. It is intended to inform society about itself and to make events public that would otherwise remain private. In modern society, news media are the chief purveyor of information and opinion about public affairs. Journalism, however, is not to be confused with the news media or the news itself. In some nations, the news media is government-controlled and not an independent body that operates within journalistic frameworks. In democratic societies, access to information can play a key role in a system of checks and balances designed to limit the overreach of powers concentrated in governments, businesses and other entities and individuals. Access to verifiable information gathered by independent media sources adhering to journalistic standards can also provide ordinary citizens with the tools they need to participate in the political process. The role and status of journalism, along with mass media, have undergone profound changes resulting from the publication of news on the Internet. This has created a shift away from print media consumption as people increasingly consume news on e-readers, smartphones, and other electronic devices, challenging news organizations to fully monetize digital news. Notably, in the American media landscape, newsrooms have reduced their staff and coverage as traditional media channels such as television grapple with declining audiences; for instance, at CNN, once known for its global, in-depth coverage, produced story packages were cut nearly in half from 2007 to 2012. This reduced coverage has been linked to broad audience attrition, as one-third of surveyed respondents for "The State of the News Media 2013" study published by the Pew Research Center's Project for Excellence in Journalism say they have abandoned a news outlet because it no longer provided the news and information they expected. The digital era has also ushered in a new kind of journalism in which ordinary citizens play a greater role in the capture of news while commanding greater control over its consumption. Using their video camera-equipped smartphones, people are providing news content by recording footage that they post to YouTube, which are then discovered and often used by mainstream news outlets. Meanwhile, easy access to news from a variety of online sources means that consumers can bypass the news agenda of traditional media organizations.

U.S. National Library of Medicine

  1. Journalism

    The collection, preparation, and distribution of news and related commentary and feature materials through such media as pamphlets, newsletters, newspapers, magazines, radio, motion pictures, television, and books. While originally applied to the reportage of current events in printed form, specifically newspapers, with the advent of radio and television the use of the term has broadened to include all printed and electronic communication dealing with current affairs.

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Numerology

  1. Chaldean Numerology

    The numerical value of Journalism in Chaldean Numerology is: 6

  2. Pythagorean Numerology

    The numerical value of Journalism in Pythagorean Numerology is: 6

Examples of Journalism in a Sentence

  1. David Cicilline:

    We must do something in the short term to save trustworthy journalism before it is lost forever.

  2. Johnson Hostler:

    She doesn't know the rules of journalism. She's just telling her own story. It's on us to know that you have to trust but verify. You have to check the sources. You have to figure out with the story is true because if not you end up in a mess like the one we're in now.

  3. Cyril Connolly:

    Literature is the art of writing something that will be read twice; journalism what will be grasped at once.

  4. Hunter S. Thompson:

    Gonzo journalism is a style of reporting based on William Faulkner's idea that the best fiction is far more true than any kind of journalism -- and the best journalists have always known this. True gonzo reporting needs the talents of a master journalist, the eye of an artist/photographer and the heavy balls of an actor. Because the writer must be a participant in the scene, while he's writing it -- or at least taping it, or even sketching it. Or all three. Probably the closest analogy to the ideal would be a film director/producer who writes his own scripts, does his own camera work and somehow manages to film himself in action, as the protagonist or at least a main character.

  5. Nikole Hannah-Jones:

    Nikole Hannah-Jones and Ta-Nehisi Coates are at a critical juncture in Nikole Hannah-Jones and Ta-Nehisi Coates democracy, and yet Nikole Hannah-Jones and Ta-Nehisi Coates press does not reflect the nation it serves and too often struggles to grasp the danger for Nikole Hannah-Jones and Ta-Nehisi Coates country as Nikole Hannah-Jones and Ta-Nehisi Coates see growing attacks on free speech and the fundamental right to vote, in the storied tradition of the Black press, the Center for Journalism and Democracy will help produce journalists capable of accurately and urgently covering the challenges of our democracy with a clarity, skepticism, rigor and historical dexterity that is too often missing from today's journalism.

Images & Illustrations of Journalism

  1. JournalismJournalismJournalismJournalismJournalism

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Translations for Journalism

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