What does Journalism mean?

Definitions for Journalism
ˈdʒɜr nlˌɪz əmjour·nal·ism

This dictionary definitions page includes all the possible meanings, example usage and translations of the word Journalism.

Princeton's WordNet

  1. journalism, news medianoun

    newspapers and magazines collectively

  2. journalismnoun

    the profession of reporting or photographing or editing news stories for one of the media

GCIDE

  1. Journalismnoun

    The branch of knowledge that studies phenomena associated with news collection, distribution, and editing; a course of study, especially in institutions of higher learning, that teaches students how to write, edit, or report news.

  2. Journalismnoun

    The periodical collection and publication of current news; the business of managing, editing, or writing for, journals, newspapers, magazines, broadcasting media such as radio or television, or other news media such as distribution over the internet; as, political journalism; broadcast journalism; print journalism.

Wiktionary

  1. journalismnoun

    The activity or profession of being a journalist.

  2. journalismnoun

    The aggregating, writing, editing, and presenting of news or news articles for widespread distribution, typically in periodical print publications and broadcast news media, for the purpose of informing the audience.

  3. journalismnoun

    The style of writing characteristic of material in periodical print publications and broadcast news media, consisting of direct presentation of facts or events with an attempt to minimize analysis or interpretation.

  4. Etymology: From journalisme (beginning of 19th century).

Wikipedia

  1. Journalism

    Journalism is the production and distribution of reports on the interaction of events, facts, ideas, and people that are the "news of the day" and that informs society to at least some degree of accuracy. The word, a noun, applies to the occupation (professional or not), the methods of gathering information, and the organizing literary styles. The appropriate role for journalism varies from countries to country, as do perceptions of the profession, and the resulting status. In some nations, the news media are controlled by government and are not independent. In others, news media are independent of the government and operate as private industry. In addition, countries may have differing implementations of laws handling the freedom of speech, freedom of the press as well as slander and libel cases. The proliferation of the Internet and smartphones has brought significant changes to the media landscape since the turn of the 21st century. This has created a shift in the consumption of print media channels, as people increasingly consume news through e-readers, smartphones, and other personal electronic devices, as opposed to the more traditional formats of newspapers, magazines, or television news channels. News organizations are challenged to fully monetize their digital wing, as well as improvise on the context in which they publish in print. Newspapers have seen print revenues sink at a faster pace than the rate of growth for digital revenues.

ChatGPT

  1. journalism

    Journalism is the professional practice of gathering, verifying, and presenting information about current events, trends, issues, and people to the public through various media such as newspapers, magazines, radio, television, and the internet. It involves activities such as researching, reporting, writing, editing, and broadcasting news, and it is guided by principles such as accuracy, fairness, objectivity, and public accountability.

Webster Dictionary

  1. Journalismnoun

    the keeping of a journal or diary

  2. Journalismnoun

    the periodical collection and publication of current news; the business of managing, editing, or writing for, journals or newspapers; as, political journalism

  3. Etymology: [Cf. F. journalisme.]

Wikidata

  1. Journalism

    Journalism is the activity, or product, of journalists or others engaged in the preparation of written, visual, or audio material intended for dissemination through public media with reference to factual, ongoing events of public concern. It is intended to inform society about itself and to make events public that would otherwise remain private. In modern society, news media are the chief purveyor of information and opinion about public affairs. Journalism, however, is not to be confused with the news media or the news itself. In some nations, the news media is government-controlled and not an independent body that operates within journalistic frameworks. In democratic societies, access to information can play a key role in a system of checks and balances designed to limit the overreach of powers concentrated in governments, businesses and other entities and individuals. Access to verifiable information gathered by independent media sources adhering to journalistic standards can also provide ordinary citizens with the tools they need to participate in the political process. The role and status of journalism, along with mass media, have undergone profound changes resulting from the publication of news on the Internet. This has created a shift away from print media consumption as people increasingly consume news on e-readers, smartphones, and other electronic devices, challenging news organizations to fully monetize digital news. Notably, in the American media landscape, newsrooms have reduced their staff and coverage as traditional media channels such as television grapple with declining audiences; for instance, at CNN, once known for its global, in-depth coverage, produced story packages were cut nearly in half from 2007 to 2012. This reduced coverage has been linked to broad audience attrition, as one-third of surveyed respondents for "The State of the News Media 2013" study published by the Pew Research Center's Project for Excellence in Journalism say they have abandoned a news outlet because it no longer provided the news and information they expected. The digital era has also ushered in a new kind of journalism in which ordinary citizens play a greater role in the capture of news while commanding greater control over its consumption. Using their video camera-equipped smartphones, people are providing news content by recording footage that they post to YouTube, which are then discovered and often used by mainstream news outlets. Meanwhile, easy access to news from a variety of online sources means that consumers can bypass the news agenda of traditional media organizations.

U.S. National Library of Medicine

  1. Journalism

    The collection, preparation, and distribution of news and related commentary and feature materials through such media as pamphlets, newsletters, newspapers, magazines, radio, motion pictures, television, and books. While originally applied to the reportage of current events in printed form, specifically newspapers, with the advent of radio and television the use of the term has broadened to include all printed and electronic communication dealing with current affairs.

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Numerology

  1. Chaldean Numerology

    The numerical value of Journalism in Chaldean Numerology is: 6

  2. Pythagorean Numerology

    The numerical value of Journalism in Pythagorean Numerology is: 6

Examples of Journalism in a Sentence

  1. Mariane Pearl:

    In 2014, impunity in journalism murder cases reached a staggering 96 percent and the remaining 4 percent obtained only partial justice, we have become targets. Insurgent groups no longer use reporters to transmit news, but instead kidnap them to make news. They treat us as enemy combatants and spies. This is our everyday reality.

  2. Gavin Buckley:

    These guys, they don't make a lot of money. They do journalism because they love what they do. And they got a newspaper out today.

  3. Mollie Hemingway:

    It is a sad reminder that many in the media are not interested in journalism but progressive advocacy.

  4. Fox Corporation:

    I think a lot of the noise that you hear about this case, is actually not about the law and it’s not about journalism, it’s really about the politics.

  5. Mark Thompson:

    We tend to be quite leery about the idea of almost habituating people to find our journalism somewhere else, we're also generically worried about our journalism being scrambled in a kind of Magimix (blender) with everyone else's journalism.

Popularity rank by frequency of use

Journalism#1#7287#10000

Translations for Journalism

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