What does yeast mean?

Definitions for yeast
yistyeast

This dictionary definitions page includes all the possible meanings, example usage and translations of the word yeast.

Princeton's WordNet

  1. yeast, barmnoun

    a commercial leavening agent containing yeast cells; used to raise the dough in making bread and for fermenting beer or whiskey

  2. yeastnoun

    any of various single-celled fungi that reproduce asexually by budding or division

Wiktionary

  1. yeastnoun

    An often humid, yellowish froth produced by fermenting malt worts, and used to brew beer, leaven bread, and also used in certain medicines.

  2. yeastnoun

    A type of single-celled fungus.

  3. yeastnoun

    A compressed cake or dried granules of this substance used for mixing with flour to make bread dough rise.

  4. yeastnoun

    A frothy foam.

  5. yeastverb

    To ferment.

  6. yeastverb

    To rise.

  7. yeastverb

    To exaggerate

  8. Etymology: From giest, from jestuz.

Wikipedia

  1. Yeast

    Yeasts are eukaryotic, single-celled microorganisms classified as members of the fungus kingdom. The first yeast originated hundreds of millions of years ago, and at least 1,500 species are currently recognized. They are estimated to constitute 1% of all described fungal species.Yeasts are unicellular organisms that evolved from multicellular ancestors, with some species having the ability to develop multicellular characteristics by forming strings of connected budding cells known as pseudohyphae or false hyphae. Yeast sizes vary greatly, depending on species and environment, typically measuring 3–4 µm in diameter, although some yeasts can grow to 40 µm in size. Most yeasts reproduce asexually by mitosis, and many do so by the asymmetric division process known as budding. With their single-celled growth habit, yeasts can be contrasted with molds, which grow hyphae. Fungal species that can take both forms (depending on temperature or other conditions) are called dimorphic fungi. The yeast species Saccharomyces cerevisiae converts carbohydrates to carbon dioxide and alcohols through the process of fermentation. The products of this reaction have been used in baking and the production of alcoholic beverages for thousands of years. S. cerevisiae is also an important model organism in modern cell biology research, and is one of the most thoroughly studied eukaryotic microorganisms. Researchers have cultured it in order to understand the biology of the eukaryotic cell and ultimately human biology in great detail. Other species of yeasts, such as Candida albicans, are opportunistic pathogens and can cause infections in humans. Yeasts have recently been used to generate electricity in microbial fuel cells and to produce ethanol for the biofuel industry. Yeasts do not form a single taxonomic or phylogenetic grouping. The term "yeast" is often taken as a synonym for Saccharomyces cerevisiae, but the phylogenetic diversity of yeasts is shown by their placement in two separate phyla: the Ascomycota and the Basidiomycota. The budding yeasts or "true yeasts" are classified in the order Saccharomycetales, within the phylum Ascomycota.

ChatGPT

  1. yeast

    Yeast is a type of single-celled microorganism that belongs to the fungi kingdom. Commonly known for its role in fermentation, it is used in baking to help dough rise, and in brewing to produce alcohol. Certain species of yeast are also used in biotechnology and scientific research due to their rapid growth and genetics. Some types of yeast can also cause infections in humans.

Webster Dictionary

  1. Yeastnoun

    the foam, or troth (top yeast), or the sediment (bottom yeast), of beer or other in fermentation, which contains the yeast plant or its spores, and under certain conditions produces fermentation in saccharine or farinaceous substances; a preparation used for raising dough for bread or cakes, and making it light and puffy; barm; ferment

  2. Yeastnoun

    spume, or foam, of water

  3. Yeastnoun

    a form of fungus which grows as indvidual rounded cells, rather than in a mycelium, and reproduces by budding; esp. members of the orders Endomycetales and Moniliales. Some fungi may grow both as a yeast or as a mycelium, depending on the conditions of growth

  4. Etymology: [OE. eest, est, AS. gist; akin to D. gest, gist, G. gischt, gscht, OHG. jesan, jerian, to ferment, G. gischen, gschen, ghren, Gr. boiled, zei^n to boil, Skr. yas. 111.]

Wikidata

  1. Yeast

    Yeasts are eukaryotic microorganisms classified in the kingdom Fungi, with 1,500 species currently described. Yeasts are unicellular, although some species with yeast forms may become multicellular through the formation of strings of connected budding cells known as pseudohyphae, or false hyphae, as seen in most molds. Yeast size can vary greatly depending on the species, typically measuring 3–4 µm in diameter, although some yeasts can reach over 40 µm. Most yeasts reproduce asexually by mitosis, and many do so by an asymmetric division process called budding. By fermentation, the yeast species Saccharomyces cerevisiae converts carbohydrates to carbon dioxide and alcohols – for thousands of years the carbon dioxide has been used in baking and the alcohol in alcoholic beverages. It is also a centrally important model organism in modern cell biology research, and is one of the most thoroughly researched eukaryotic microorganisms. Researchers have used it to gather information about the biology of the eukaryotic cell and ultimately human biology. Other species of yeasts, such as Candida albicans, are opportunistic pathogens and can cause infections in humans. Yeasts have recently been used to generate electricity in microbial fuel cells, and produce ethanol for the biofuel industry.

Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

  1. Yeast

    yēst, n. the froth of malt liquors in fermentation: the vegetable growth to which fermentation is due, of value in brewing, baking, &c.: (Shak.) spume or foam of water.—v.i. to ferment.—ns. Yeast′iness, the state of being yeasty or frothy; Yeast′-plant, a small plant causing alcoholic fermentation in saccharine liquids; Yeast′-pow′der, a baking powder.—adj. Yeast′y, like yeast: frothy, foamy: unsubstantial. [A.S. gist, gyst; Ger. gäscht, gischt.]

Surnames Frequency by Census Records

  1. YEAST

    According to the U.S. Census Bureau, Yeast is ranked #73005 in terms of the most common surnames in America.

    The Yeast surname appeared 266 times in the 2010 census and if you were to sample 100,000 people in the United States, approximately 0 would have the surname Yeast.

    80.4% or 214 total occurrences were White.
    15% or 40 total occurrences were Black.
    2.2% or 6 total occurrences were of Hispanic origin.
    1.8% or 5 total occurrences were of two or more races.

Matched Categories

Anagrams for yeast »

  1. as yet

  2. yeats

  3. teasy

How to pronounce yeast?

How to say yeast in sign language?

Numerology

  1. Chaldean Numerology

    The numerical value of yeast in Chaldean Numerology is: 5

  2. Pythagorean Numerology

    The numerical value of yeast in Pythagorean Numerology is: 7

Examples of yeast in a Sentence

  1. Cyril Brun:

    The yeast converts the sugar into alcohol, and because of the pressure, carbon dioxide is created, providing a shower of bubbles.

  2. Raquel Dardik:

    All that stuff has sugar which will change the bacteria and yeast proportions which can cause infections. Those substances can also be irritating to the vaginal skin, so it might seem like a good idea at the time, but you may have either vaginal irritation or a vaginal infection afterwards.

  3. Elizabeth Sattely:

    We used these genes to engineer a wild relative of tobacco to make the drug precursor and think we could also use these genes to make the drug in other easy-to-grow organisms such as yeast.

  4. Nir Barzilai:

    We’ve been successful to take models like snails, like yeast, like nematodes, like flies, like rats, like monkeys and to extend their healthy life span with either genetic manipulations or manipulations with the environment or with drugs, so we have proven the pre-concept here, again and again.

  5. Epicurus:

    Yeast will not only rise bread, but also the human spirit -Jim Carey

Popularity rank by frequency of use

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Translations for yeast

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"yeast." Definitions.net. STANDS4 LLC, 2024. Web. 24 Jun 2024. <https://www.definitions.net/definition/yeast>.

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    given to or marked by the consumption of alcohol
    A sesquipedalian
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