What does wound mean?

Definitions for wound
wund; Older Use and Literary waʊndwound

Here are all the possible meanings and translations of the word wound.

Princeton's WordNet

  1. wound, lesion(noun)

    an injury to living tissue (especially an injury involving a cut or break in the skin)

  2. wound, injury, combat injury(noun)

    a casualty to military personnel resulting from combat

  3. wound(noun)

    a figurative injury (to your feelings or pride)

    "he feared that mentioning it might reopen the wound"; "deep in her breast lives the silent wound"; "The right reader of a good poem can tell the moment it strikes him that he has taken an immortal wound--that he will never get over it"--Robert Frost

  4. wound, wounding(adj)

    the act of inflicting a wound

  5. wound(verb)

    put in a coil

  6. injure, wound(verb)

    cause injuries or bodily harm to

  7. hurt, wound, injure, bruise, offend, spite(verb)

    hurt the feelings of

    "She hurt me when she did not include me among her guests"; "This remark really bruised my ego"

Webster Dictionary

  1. Wound

    of Wind

    Etymology: [OE. wounde, wunde, AS. wund; akin to OFries. wunde, OS. wunda, D. wonde, OHG. wunta, G. wunde, Icel. und, and to AS., OS., & G. wund sore, wounded, OHG. wunt, Goth. wunds, and perhaps also to Goth. winnan to suffer, E. win. 140. Cf. Zounds.]

  2. Wound

    of Wind

    Etymology: [OE. wounde, wunde, AS. wund; akin to OFries. wunde, OS. wunda, D. wonde, OHG. wunta, G. wunde, Icel. und, and to AS., OS., & G. wund sore, wounded, OHG. wunt, Goth. wunds, and perhaps also to Goth. winnan to suffer, E. win. 140. Cf. Zounds.]

  3. Wound

    imp. & p. p. of Wind to twist, and Wind to sound by blowing

    Etymology: [OE. wounde, wunde, AS. wund; akin to OFries. wunde, OS. wunda, D. wonde, OHG. wunta, G. wunde, Icel. und, and to AS., OS., & G. wund sore, wounded, OHG. wunt, Goth. wunds, and perhaps also to Goth. winnan to suffer, E. win. 140. Cf. Zounds.]

  4. Wound(noun)

    a hurt or injury caused by violence; specifically, a breach of the skin and flesh of an animal, or in the substance of any creature or living thing; a cut, stab, rent, or the like

    Etymology: [OE. wounde, wunde, AS. wund; akin to OFries. wunde, OS. wunda, D. wonde, OHG. wunta, G. wunde, Icel. und, and to AS., OS., & G. wund sore, wounded, OHG. wunt, Goth. wunds, and perhaps also to Goth. winnan to suffer, E. win. 140. Cf. Zounds.]

  5. Wound(noun)

    fig.: An injury, hurt, damage, detriment, or the like, to feeling, faculty, reputation, etc

    Etymology: [OE. wounde, wunde, AS. wund; akin to OFries. wunde, OS. wunda, D. wonde, OHG. wunta, G. wunde, Icel. und, and to AS., OS., & G. wund sore, wounded, OHG. wunt, Goth. wunds, and perhaps also to Goth. winnan to suffer, E. win. 140. Cf. Zounds.]

  6. Wound(noun)

    an injury to the person by which the skin is divided, or its continuity broken; a lesion of the body, involving some solution of continuity

    Etymology: [OE. wounde, wunde, AS. wund; akin to OFries. wunde, OS. wunda, D. wonde, OHG. wunta, G. wunde, Icel. und, and to AS., OS., & G. wund sore, wounded, OHG. wunt, Goth. wunds, and perhaps also to Goth. winnan to suffer, E. win. 140. Cf. Zounds.]

  7. Wound(noun)

    to hurt by violence; to produce a breach, or separation of parts, in, as by a cut, stab, blow, or the like

    Etymology: [OE. wounde, wunde, AS. wund; akin to OFries. wunde, OS. wunda, D. wonde, OHG. wunta, G. wunde, Icel. und, and to AS., OS., & G. wund sore, wounded, OHG. wunt, Goth. wunds, and perhaps also to Goth. winnan to suffer, E. win. 140. Cf. Zounds.]

  8. Wound(noun)

    to hurt the feelings of; to pain by disrespect, ingratitude, or the like; to cause injury to

    Etymology: [OE. wounde, wunde, AS. wund; akin to OFries. wunde, OS. wunda, D. wonde, OHG. wunta, G. wunde, Icel. und, and to AS., OS., & G. wund sore, wounded, OHG. wunt, Goth. wunds, and perhaps also to Goth. winnan to suffer, E. win. 140. Cf. Zounds.]

Freebase

  1. Wound

    A wound is a type of injury in which skin is torn, cut, or punctured, or where blunt force trauma causes a contusion. In pathology, it specifically refers to a sharp injury which damages the dermis of the skin.

Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

  1. Wound

    wownd, pa.t. and pa.p. of wind.

  2. Wound

    wōōnd, n. any division of soft parts, including the skin, produced by external mechanical force—whether incised, punctured, contused, lacerated, or poisoned: any cut, bruise, hurt, or injury.—v.t. to make a wound in: to injure.—adj. Woun′dable, capable of being wounded.—n. Woun′der.—adv. Woun′dily (coll.), excessively.—n. Woun′ding.—adj. Wound′less, exempt from being wounded, invulnerable: harmless.—n. Wound′wort, a name applied to several plants of popular repute as vulneraries, as the kidney-vetch, &c.: a plant of genus Stachys, the marsh or clown's woundwort.—adj. Woun′dy, causing wounds: (coll.) excessive. [A.S. wund (Ger. wunde, Ice. und)—A.S. wund, wounded; prob. orig. pa.p. of A.S. winnan, to fight, strive.]

British National Corpus

  1. Nouns Frequency

    Rank popularity for the word 'wound' in Nouns Frequency: #1756

  2. Verbs Frequency

    Rank popularity for the word 'wound' in Verbs Frequency: #1005

How to pronounce wound?

  1. Alex
    US English
    Daniel
    British
    Karen
    Australian
    Veena
    Indian

How to say wound in sign language?

Numerology

  1. Chaldean Numerology

    The numerical value of wound in Chaldean Numerology is: 1

  2. Pythagorean Numerology

    The numerical value of wound in Pythagorean Numerology is: 5

Examples of wound in a Sentence

  1. Edward R. Murrow:

    The politician is ... trained in the art of inexactitude. His words tend to be blunt or rounded, because if they have a cutting edge they may later return to wound him.

  2. James Scot:

    If you don’t feel ordained by the Universe to do this job, do something else. The intelligence community has to shut down the gaping wound that is the insider threat epidemic we are experiencing right now.

  3. Jeffrey Abramson:

    Whatever scabbing or healing had begun to take place, the Boston wound is freshly ripped open by the events in Paris.

  4. Thomas Farley:

    We have n’t seen a public health emergency like this in the last century, it’s time for us to rethink our assumptions, and consider options we had n’t seen before. Unlike similar efforts by other cities, the injection sites would not need City Council approval because they would be privately run. Drug-related overdose deaths began to spoke in 2015 with the presence of fetanyl, according to Philadelphia Public Health. ( Fox News) The sites would give drug addicts a safe haven to shoot up and would offer sterile injection equipment, including needles, and Naloxone. Fox News would also give referrals to treatment centers, social services clinics and wound care facilities. The idea comes as a paradigm shift in the nation’s effort to stem the tide of opioid-related deaths.Seattle and New York have been among places that have mulled similar measures, but the efforts stalled because of either legal or bureaucratic hurdles. Canada and Europe have operated similar types of facilities for the last few decades.

  5. Gennadiy Goldberg:

    The repo operations are a band-aid, but the wound isn't healed fully.

Images & Illustrations of wound

  1. woundwoundwoundwoundwound

Popularity rank by frequency of use

wound#1#9117#10000

Translations for wound

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