What does wing mean?

Definitions for wing
wɪŋwing

Here are all the possible meanings and translations of the word wing.

Princeton's WordNet

  1. wingnoun

    a movable organ for flying (one of a pair)

  2. wingnoun

    one of the horizontal airfoils on either side of the fuselage of an airplane

  3. wing, offstage, backstagenoun

    a stage area out of sight of the audience

  4. wingnoun

    a unit of military aircraft

  5. flank, wingnoun

    the side of military or naval formation

    "they attacked the enemy's right flank"

  6. wingnoun

    a hockey player stationed in a forward position on either side

  7. wingnoun

    (in flight formation) a position to the side and just to the rear of another aircraft

  8. wingnoun

    a group within a political party or legislature or other organization that holds distinct views or has a particular function

    "they are the progressive wing of the Republican Party"

  9. wingnoun

    the wing of a fowl

    "he preferred the drumsticks to the wings"

  10. fender, wingnoun

    a barrier that surrounds the wheels of a vehicle to block splashing water or mud

    "in Britain they call a fender a wing"

  11. annex, annexe, extension, wingverb

    an addition that extends a main building

  12. fly, wingverb

    travel through the air; be airborne

    "Man cannot fly"

GCIDE

  1. Wingnoun

    (Aeronautics) Any surface used primarily for supporting a flying machine in flight, especially the flat or slightly curved planes on a heavier-than-air aircraft which provide most of the lift. In fixed-wing aircraft there are usually two main wings fixed on opposite sides of the fuselage. Smaller wings are typically placed near the tail primarily for stabilization, but may be absent in certain kinds of aircraft. Helicopters usually have no fixed wings, the lift being supplied by the rotating blade.

    Etymology: [OE. winge, wenge; probably of Scand. origin; cf. Dan. & Sw. vinge, Icel. vngr.]

  2. Wingnoun

    One of two factions within an organization, as a political party, which are opposed to each other; as, right wing or left wing.

    Etymology: [OE. winge, wenge; probably of Scand. origin; cf. Dan. & Sw. vinge, Icel. vngr.]

  3. Wingnoun

    An administrative division of the air force or of a naval air group, consisting of a certain number of airplanes and the personnel associated with them.

    Etymology: [OE. winge, wenge; probably of Scand. origin; cf. Dan. & Sw. vinge, Icel. vngr.]

Wiktionary

  1. wingnoun

    An appendage of an animal's (bird, bat, insect) body that enables it to fly.

    Etymology: From vængr.

  2. wingnoun

    Human arm.

    Etymology: From vængr.

  3. wingnoun

    Part of an airplane that produces the lift for rising into the air.

    Etymology: From vængr.

  4. wingnoun

    A part of something that is lesser in size than the main body, such as an extension from the main building.

    Etymology: From vængr.

  5. wingnoun

    A fraction of a political movement. Usually implies a position apart from the mainstream center position.

    Etymology: From vængr.

  6. wingnoun

    An organizational grouping in a military aviation service:

    Etymology: From vængr.

  7. wingnoun

    A panel of a car which encloses the wheel area, especially the front wheels.

    Etymology: From vængr.

  8. wingnoun

    A platform on either side of the bridge of a vessel, normally found in pairs.

    Etymology: From vængr.

  9. wingnoun

    A position in several field games on either side of the field.

    Etymology: From vængr.

  10. wingverb

    To injure slightly (as with a gunshot), especially in the arm.

    Etymology: From vængr.

  11. wingverb

    To fly.

    Etymology: From vængr.

  12. wingverb

    To add a wing (extra part) to.

    Etymology: From vængr.

  13. wingverb

    To act or speak extemporaneously; to improvise; to wing it.

    Etymology: From vængr.

  14. wingverb

    To throw.

    Etymology: From vængr.

  15. wingnoun

    A player occupying such a position, also called a winger

    Etymology: From vængr.

  16. wingnoun

    A flattened extension of a tridimensional plant organ.

    Etymology: From vængr.

  17. wingnoun

    = háu010Dek

    Etymology: From vængr.

Webster Dictionary

  1. Wingnoun

    one of the two anterior limbs of a bird, pterodactyl, or bat. They correspond to the arms of man, and are usually modified for flight, but in the case of a few species of birds, as the ostrich, auk, etc., the wings are used only as an assistance in running or swimming

    Etymology: [OE. winge, wenge; probably of Scand. origin; cf. Dan. & Sw. vinge, Icel. vngr.]

  2. Wingnoun

    any similar member or instrument used for the purpose of flying

    Etymology: [OE. winge, wenge; probably of Scand. origin; cf. Dan. & Sw. vinge, Icel. vngr.]

  3. Wingnoun

    one of the two pairs of upper thoracic appendages of most hexapod insects. They are broad, fanlike organs formed of a double membrane and strengthened by chitinous veins or nervures

    Etymology: [OE. winge, wenge; probably of Scand. origin; cf. Dan. & Sw. vinge, Icel. vngr.]

  4. Wingnoun

    one of the large pectoral fins of the flying fishes

    Etymology: [OE. winge, wenge; probably of Scand. origin; cf. Dan. & Sw. vinge, Icel. vngr.]

  5. Wingnoun

    passage by flying; flight; as, to take wing

    Etymology: [OE. winge, wenge; probably of Scand. origin; cf. Dan. & Sw. vinge, Icel. vngr.]

  6. Wingnoun

    motive or instrument of flight; means of flight or of rapid motion

    Etymology: [OE. winge, wenge; probably of Scand. origin; cf. Dan. & Sw. vinge, Icel. vngr.]

  7. Wingnoun

    anything which agitates the air as a wing does, or which is put in winglike motion by the action of the air, as a fan or vane for winnowing grain, the vane or sail of a windmill, etc

    Etymology: [OE. winge, wenge; probably of Scand. origin; cf. Dan. & Sw. vinge, Icel. vngr.]

  8. Wingnoun

    an ornament worn on the shoulder; a small epaulet or shoulder knot

    Etymology: [OE. winge, wenge; probably of Scand. origin; cf. Dan. & Sw. vinge, Icel. vngr.]

  9. Wingnoun

    any appendage resembling the wing of a bird or insect in shape or appearance

    Etymology: [OE. winge, wenge; probably of Scand. origin; cf. Dan. & Sw. vinge, Icel. vngr.]

  10. Wingnoun

    one of the broad, thin, anterior lobes of the foot of a pteropod, used as an organ in swimming

    Etymology: [OE. winge, wenge; probably of Scand. origin; cf. Dan. & Sw. vinge, Icel. vngr.]

  11. Wingnoun

    any membranaceous expansion, as that along the sides of certain stems, or of a fruit of the kind called samara

    Etymology: [OE. winge, wenge; probably of Scand. origin; cf. Dan. & Sw. vinge, Icel. vngr.]

  12. Wingnoun

    either of the two side petals of a papilionaceous flower

    Etymology: [OE. winge, wenge; probably of Scand. origin; cf. Dan. & Sw. vinge, Icel. vngr.]

  13. Wingnoun

    one of two corresponding appendages attached; a sidepiece

    Etymology: [OE. winge, wenge; probably of Scand. origin; cf. Dan. & Sw. vinge, Icel. vngr.]

  14. Wingnoun

    a side building, less than the main edifice; as, one of the wings of a palace

    Etymology: [OE. winge, wenge; probably of Scand. origin; cf. Dan. & Sw. vinge, Icel. vngr.]

  15. Wingnoun

    the longer side of crownworks, etc., connecting them with the main work

    Etymology: [OE. winge, wenge; probably of Scand. origin; cf. Dan. & Sw. vinge, Icel. vngr.]

  16. Wingnoun

    a side shoot of a tree or plant; a branch growing up by the side of another

    Etymology: [OE. winge, wenge; probably of Scand. origin; cf. Dan. & Sw. vinge, Icel. vngr.]

  17. Wingnoun

    the right or left division of an army, regiment, etc

    Etymology: [OE. winge, wenge; probably of Scand. origin; cf. Dan. & Sw. vinge, Icel. vngr.]

  18. Wingnoun

    that part of the hold or orlop of a vessel which is nearest the sides. In a fleet, one of the extremities when the ships are drawn up in line, or when forming the two sides of a triangle

    Etymology: [OE. winge, wenge; probably of Scand. origin; cf. Dan. & Sw. vinge, Icel. vngr.]

  19. Wingnoun

    one of the sides of the stags in a theater

    Etymology: [OE. winge, wenge; probably of Scand. origin; cf. Dan. & Sw. vinge, Icel. vngr.]

  20. Wingverb

    to furnish with wings; to enable to fly, or to move with celerity

    Etymology: [OE. winge, wenge; probably of Scand. origin; cf. Dan. & Sw. vinge, Icel. vngr.]

  21. Wingverb

    to supply with wings or sidepieces

    Etymology: [OE. winge, wenge; probably of Scand. origin; cf. Dan. & Sw. vinge, Icel. vngr.]

  22. Wingverb

    to transport by flight; to cause to fly

    Etymology: [OE. winge, wenge; probably of Scand. origin; cf. Dan. & Sw. vinge, Icel. vngr.]

  23. Wingverb

    to move through in flight; to fly through

    Etymology: [OE. winge, wenge; probably of Scand. origin; cf. Dan. & Sw. vinge, Icel. vngr.]

  24. Wingverb

    to cut off the wings of; to wound in the wing; to disable a wing of; as, to wing a bird

    Etymology: [OE. winge, wenge; probably of Scand. origin; cf. Dan. & Sw. vinge, Icel. vngr.]

Freebase

  1. Wing

    Wing is a term used by different military aviation forces for a unit of command. The terms wing, group or Staffel are used for different-sized units from one country or service to another. In some military aviation services, a wing is a relatively large formation of two or more groups, which in turn control two or more squadrons. In other contexts a wing is a smaller unit, comprising two to four squadrons, with several wings forming a group. For example, In the United States Air Force, a wing is equivalent to a group in the air forces of most Commonwealth countries and both are equivalent to an army regiment, and a USAF group is equivalent to a wing in most Commonwealth air forces.

Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

  1. Wing

    wing, n. the organ of a bird, or other animal or insect, by which it flies: flight, means of flying: anything resembling a wing, any side-piece, the side of a building, &c.: one of the longer sides of crown-works or horn-works in fortification: the flank corps or division of an army on either side: the ships on either extremity of a fleet ranged in line: (fig.) protection.—v.t. to furnish or transport with wings: to lend speed to: to supply with side-pieces: to bear in flight, to traverse by flying: to wound on the wing, to wound a person in arm or shoulder.—v.i. to soar on the wing.—adv. Wing′-and-wing′, the condition of a ship sailing before the wind with studding sails on both sides.—n. Wing′-case, the horny case or cover over the wings of some insects, as the beetle.—adj. Winged, furnished with wings: swift: wounded in the wing: lofty, sublime: alate, abounding in wings.—adv. Wing′edly, on or by wings.—adjs. Wing′-foot′ed, having wings on the feet, aliped; Wing′less, without wings.—ns. Wing′let, the bastard wing or alula of a bird: the pterygium of a weevil; Wing′-shell, a stromb: an aviculoid bivalve, a hammer-oyster: a wing-snail; Wing′-shoot′ing, the act or practice of shooting flying birds; Wing′-shot, a shot at a bird on the wing: one who shoots flying birds.—adj. shot in the wing, or while on the wing.—adj. Wing′y, having wings: soaring on wings.—Winged bull, a common form in Assyrian sculpture, symbolic of domination.—Make, Take, wing, to depart; On, Upon, the wing, flying, in motion: departing; On the wings of the wind, with the highest speed; Under one's wing, under one's protection. [Ice. vængr, a wing; Sw. vinge.]

Dictionary of Military and Associated Terms

  1. wing

    1. An Air Force unit composed normally of one primary mission group and the necessary supporting organizations, i.e., organizations designed to render supply, maintenance, hospitalization, and other services required by the primary mission groups. Primary mission groups may be functional, such as combat, training, transport, or service. 2. A fleet air wing is the basic organizational and administrative unit for naval-, land-, and tender-based aviation. Such wings are mobile units to which are assigned aircraft squadrons and tenders for administrative organization control. 3. A balanced Marine Corps task organization of aircraft groups and squadrons, together with appropriate command, air control, administrative, service, and maintenance units.

Dictionary of Nautical Terms

  1. wing

    The projecting part of a steamer's deck before and abaft each of the paddle-boxes, bounded by the wing-wale.

Military Dictionary and Gazetteer

  1. wing

    The right or left division of an army, regiment, and the like. The word is sometimes used to denote the large sides of horn-works, tenailles, and other outworks.

  2. wing

    An ornament worn on the shoulder;—a small imitation epaulette or shoulder-knot.

Editors Contribution

  1. wing

    A facet of an aircraft, airplane or aeroplane created and designed in various colors, materials, mechanisms, shapes, sizes and styles.

    The wing of the planet was very angular and smooth.

    Submitted by MaryC on March 30, 2020  
  2. wing

    An element of the body of a bird.

    The bird had beautiful wings.

    Submitted by MaryC on February 29, 2020  

Suggested Resources

  1. wing

    Song lyrics by wing -- Explore a large variety of song lyrics performed by wing on the Lyrics.com website.

  2. WING

    What does WING stand for? -- Explore the various meanings for the WING acronym on the Abbreviations.com website.

British National Corpus

  1. Spoken Corpus Frequency

    Rank popularity for the word 'wing' in Spoken Corpus Frequency: #3448

  2. Written Corpus Frequency

    Rank popularity for the word 'wing' in Written Corpus Frequency: #4042

  3. Nouns Frequency

    Rank popularity for the word 'wing' in Nouns Frequency: #887

How to pronounce wing?

How to say wing in sign language?

Numerology

  1. Chaldean Numerology

    The numerical value of wing in Chaldean Numerology is: 6

  2. Pythagorean Numerology

    The numerical value of wing in Pythagorean Numerology is: 8

Examples of wing in a Sentence

  1. Donald Trump:

    While Republicans are working every day to build up our country, the rage-filled Democrat Party is trying to tear America apart. The Democrat Party is now being led by four left-wing extremists who reject everything that we hold dear.

  2. Foreign Minister Delcy Rodriguez:

    We will not allow any country or any extreme right-wing faction to justify terrorist actions, that is inexcusable.

  3. Brian Fallon:

    There's never been any sort of embrace from any sort of representative of the establishment wing of the party signaling that it's OK to be for Bernie, so you could say,' Oh,( The Sanders campaign) should have done that in that week in between Nevada and South Carolina' ;' They should've tried to signal that there's a coalescing happening.' But really you can't pull that together in one week's time.

  4. Sheldon Whitehouse:

    We got to keep the spotlight on the six Republicans in the building behind me who are the servants of right-wing dark money interests, that is no place for a court to be in our great republic, and we have got to call it out.

  5. Per Henningsson:

    Butterflies look different from many other flying animals, compared to birds and bats. They have a very extreme wing shape -- very large, short but very broad wings compared to their little body, that is a bit of a puzzle, because that sort of wing is quite inefficient.

Images & Illustrations of wing

  1. wingwingwingwingwing

Popularity rank by frequency of use

wing#1#4096#10000

Translations for wing

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