What does virus mean?

Definitions for virus
ˈvaɪ rəsvirus

Here are all the possible meanings and translations of the word virus.

Princeton's WordNet

  1. virusnoun

    (virology) ultramicroscopic infectious agent that replicates itself only within cells of living hosts; many are pathogenic; a piece of nucleic acid (DNA or RNA) wrapped in a thin coat of protein

  2. virusnoun

    a harmful or corrupting agency

    "bigotry is a virus that must not be allowed to spread"; "the virus of jealousy is latent in everyone"

  3. virus, computer virusnoun

    a software program capable of reproducing itself and usually capable of causing great harm to files or other programs on the same computer

    "a true virus cannot spread to another computer without human assistance"

GCIDE

  1. Virusnoun

    (Computers) a program or segment of program code that may make copies of itself (replicate), attach itself to other programs, and perform unwanted actions within a computer; also called computer virus or virus program. Such programs are almost always introduced into a computer without the knowledge or assent of its owner, and are often malicious, causing destructive actions such as erasing data on disk, but sometime only annoying, causing peculiar objects to appear on the display. The form of sociopathic mental disease that causes a programmer to write such a program has not yet been given a name. Compare trojan horse.

    Etymology: [L., a slimy liquid, a poisonous liquid, poison, stench; akin to Gr. poison, Skr. visha. Cf. Wizen, v. i.]

  2. Virusnoun

    any of numerous submicroscopic complex organic objects which have genetic material and may be considered as living organisms but have no proper cell membrane, and thus cannot by themselves perform metabolic processes, requiring entry into a host cell in order to multiply. The simplest viruses have no lipid envelope and may be considered as complex aggregates of molecules, sometimes only a nucleic acid (DNA or RNA) and a coat protein. They are sometimes viewed as being on the borderline between living and nonliving objects. They are smaller than living cells in size, usually between 20 and 300 nm; thus they pass through standard filters, and were previously referred to as filterable virus. The manifestations of disease caused by multiplication of viruses in cells may be due to destruction of the cells caused by subversion of the cellular metabolic processes by the virus, or by synthesis of a virus-specific toxin. Viruses may infect animals, plants, or microorganisms; those infecting bacteria are also called bacteriophages. Certain bacteriophages may be non-destructive and benign in the host; -- see bacteriophage.

    Etymology: [L., a slimy liquid, a poisonous liquid, poison, stench; akin to Gr. poison, Skr. visha. Cf. Wizen, v. i.]

Wiktionary

  1. virusnoun

    Venom, as produced by a poisonous animal etc.

    Etymology: From virus. First use in the computer context by David Gerrold in his 1972 book When HARLIE Was One.

  2. virusnoun

    A submicroscopic infectious organism, now understood to be a non-cellular structure consisting of a core of DNA or RNA surrounded by a protein coat. It requires a living cell to replicate, and often causes disease in the host organism.

    Etymology: From virus. First use in the computer context by David Gerrold in his 1972 book When HARLIE Was One.

  3. virusnoun

    A computer virus.

    Etymology: From virus. First use in the computer context by David Gerrold in his 1972 book When HARLIE Was One.

Webster Dictionary

  1. Virusverb

    contagious or poisonous matter, as of specific ulcers, the bite of snakes, etc.; -- applied to organic poisons

    Etymology: [L., a slimy liquid, a poisonous liquid, poison, stench; akin to Gr. poison, Skr. visha. Cf. Wizen, v. i.]

  2. Virusverb

    the special contagion, inappreciable to the senses and acting in exceedingly minute quantities, by which a disease is introduced into the organism and maintained there

    Etymology: [L., a slimy liquid, a poisonous liquid, poison, stench; akin to Gr. poison, Skr. visha. Cf. Wizen, v. i.]

  3. Virusverb

    fig.: Any morbid corrupting quality in intellectual or moral conditions; something that poisons the mind or the soul; as, the virus of obscene books

    Etymology: [L., a slimy liquid, a poisonous liquid, poison, stench; akin to Gr. poison, Skr. visha. Cf. Wizen, v. i.]

Freebase

  1. Virus

    A virus is a small infectious agent that can replicate only inside the living cells of an organism. Viruses can infect all types of organisms, from animals and plants to bacteria and archaea. Since Dmitri Ivanovsky's 1892 article describing a non-bacterial pathogen infecting tobacco plants, and the discovery of the tobacco mosaic virus by Martinus Beijerinck in 1898, about 5,000 viruses have been described in detail, although there are millions of different types. Viruses are found in almost every ecosystem on Earth and are the most abundant type of biological entity. The study of viruses is known as virology, a sub-speciality of microbiology. Virus particles consist of two or three parts: i the genetic material made from either DNA or RNA, long molecules that carry genetic information; ii a protein coat that protects these genes; and in some cases iii an envelope of lipids that surrounds the protein coat when they are outside a cell. The shapes of viruses range from simple helical and icosahedral forms to more complex structures. The average virus is about one one-hundredth the size of the average bacterium. Most viruses are too small to be seen directly with an optical microscope.

Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

  1. Virus

    vī′rus, n. contagious or poisonous matter (as of ulcers, &c.): the poison which causes infection: any foul, hurtful matter.—adjs. Vī′rose, Vī′rous; Virūlif′erous, bearing a specific virus. [L.; cog. with Gr. ios, Sans. visha, poison.]

The New Hacker's Dictionary

  1. virus

    [from the obvious analogy with biological viruses, via SF] A cracker program that searches out other programs and ‘infects’ them by embedding a copy of itself in them, so that they become Trojan horses. When these programs are executed, the embedded virus is executed too, thus propagating the ‘infection’. This normally happens invisibly to the user. Unlike a worm, a virus cannot infect other computers without assistance. It is propagated by vectors such as humans trading programs with their friends (see SEX). The virus may do nothing but propagate itself and then allow the program to run normally. Usually, however, after propagating silently for a while, it starts doing things like writing cute messages on the terminal or playing strange tricks with the display (some viruses include nice display hacks). Many nasty viruses, written by particularly perversely minded crackers, do irreversible damage, like nuking all the user's files.In the 1990s, viruses became a serious problem, especially among Windows users; the lack of security on these machines enables viruses to spread easily, even infecting the operating system (Unix machines, by contrast, are immune to such attacks). The production of special anti-virus software has become an industry, and a number of exaggerated media reports have caused outbreaks of near hysteria among users; many lusers tend to blame everything that doesn't work as they had expected on virus attacks. Accordingly, this sense of virus has passed not only into techspeak but into also popular usage (where it is often incorrectly used to denote a worm or even a Trojan horse). See phage; compare back door; see also Unix conspiracy.

Suggested Resources

  1. virus

    Song lyrics by virus -- Explore a large variety of song lyrics performed by virus on the Lyrics.com website.

British National Corpus

  1. Nouns Frequency

    Rank popularity for the word 'virus' in Nouns Frequency: #1846

How to pronounce virus?

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Numerology

  1. Chaldean Numerology

    The numerical value of virus in Chaldean Numerology is: 9

  2. Pythagorean Numerology

    The numerical value of virus in Pythagorean Numerology is: 8

Examples of virus in a Sentence

  1. Kamala Harris:

    We are breaking records of the number of people that are contracting, a deadly virus, and this administration fails to take personal responsibility or responsibility in terms of leading the nation through this dangerous, dangerous and deadly mass casualty event, and that's why President Donald Trump have forfeited President Donald Trump right to a second term in office.

  2. The Atlantic:

    Despite some shifting numbers, neither our vaccines nor our immune systems are failing us, or even coming close. Vaccine effectiveness isn’t a monolith, and neither is immunity. Staying safe from a virus depends on host and pathogen alike; a change in either can chip away at the barriers that separate the two without obliterating them, which is exactly what we’re seeing now.

  3. Lawrence Gostin:

    You can clear a forest of the shrubbery. But if you leave some shrubs and trees standing, the fire will find them, the virus will find you. It is searching for hosts that are not immune. The fact that you live in New England or New York doesn’t insulate you.

  4. Brittany Miller:

    We don't have to worry about the politics or circumstances of the virus, we can do what's best for our kids' education, and then you add in the curriculum that we're not even in agreeance with and this is an obvious alternative.

  5. Christopher Samuda:

    Once there is, in reality, the management of the virus to the extent that it does not pose a risk to the Games going on, certainly the Jamaican position is that we must prepare for the Games and we must support all efforts for it to go on.

Popularity rank by frequency of use

virus#1#2224#10000

Translations for virus

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    the quality of being impenetrable (by people or light or missiles etc.)
    • A. viverrine
    • B. imperviousness
    • C. couvade
    • D. larceny

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