What does theatre mean?

Definitions for theatre
ˈθi ə tər, ˈθiə-the·atre

This dictionary definitions page includes all the possible meanings, example usage and translations of the word theatre.

Princeton's WordNet

  1. theater, theatre, housenoun

    a building where theatrical performances or motion-picture shows can be presented

    "the house was full"

  2. dramaturgy, dramatic art, dramatics, theater, theatrenoun

    the art of writing and producing plays

  3. field, field of operations, theater, theater of operations, theatre, theatre of operationsnoun

    a region in which active military operations are in progress

    "the army was in the field awaiting action"; "he served in the Vietnam theater for three years"

Samuel Johnson's Dictionary

  1. Theatrenoun

    Etymology: theatre, Fr. theatrum, Lat.

    This wise and universal theatre,
    Presents more woful pageants than the scene
    Wherein we play. William Shakespeare, As you like it.

    When the boats came within sixty yards of the pillar, they found themselves all bound, yet so as they might go about, so as they all stood as in a theatre beholding this light. Francis Bacon.

    Shade above shade, a woody theatre
    Of stateliest view. John Milton.

    In the midst of this fair valley stood
    A native theatre, which rising slow,
    By just degrees o’erlook’d the ground below. Dryden.

Wikipedia

  1. Theatre

    Theatre or theater is a collaborative form of performing art that uses live performers, usually actors or actresses, to present the experience of a real or imagined event before a live audience in a specific place, often a stage. The performers may communicate this experience to the audience through combinations of gesture, speech, song, music, and dance. Elements of art, such as painted scenery and stagecraft such as lighting are used to enhance the physicality, presence and immediacy of the experience. The specific place of the performance is also named by the word "theatre" as derived from the Ancient Greek θέατρον (théatron, "a place for viewing"), itself from θεάομαι (theáomai, "to see", "to watch", "to observe"). Modern Western theatre comes, in large measure, from the theatre of ancient Greece, from which it borrows technical terminology, classification into genres, and many of its themes, stock characters, and plot elements. Theatre artist Patrice Pavis defines theatricality, theatrical language, stage writing and the specificity of theatre as synonymous expressions that differentiate theatre from the other performing arts, literature and the arts in general. A theatre company is an organisation that produces theatrical performances, as distinct from a theatre troupe (or acting company), which is a group of theatrical performers working together.Modern theatre includes performances of plays and musical theatre. The art forms of ballet and opera are also theatre and use many conventions such as acting, costumes and staging. They were influential to the development of musical theatre.

ChatGPT

  1. Theatre

    Theatre is a live performance art form that involves the creation and presentation of stories, characters, or events through the enactment of scripted or improvised dialogue, physical movement, music, and other elements. It typically takes place in a designated space called a theater and is performed by actors or performers in front of an audience, aiming to entertain, educate, and provoke emotional responses. Theatre incorporates various artistic disciplines such as acting, directing, set and costume design, lighting, sound, and stage management to bring stories and themes to life. It can encompass a wide range of genres and styles, including plays, musicals, dance performances, operas, and experimental and avant-garde productions.

Webster Dictionary

  1. Theatrenoun

    an edifice in which dramatic performances or spectacles are exhibited for the amusement of spectators; anciently uncovered, except the stage, but in modern times roofed

  2. Theatrenoun

    any room adapted to the exhibition of any performances before an assembly, as public lectures, scholastic exercises, anatomical demonstrations, surgical operations, etc

  3. Theatrenoun

    that which resembles a theater in form, use, or the like; a place rising by steps or gradations, like the seats of a theater

  4. Theatrenoun

    a sphere or scheme of operation

  5. Theatrenoun

    a place or region where great events are enacted; as, the theater of war

Wikidata

  1. Theatre

    Theatre is a collaborative form of fine art that uses live performers to present the experience of a real or imagined event before a live audience in a specific place. The performers may communicate this experience to the audience through combinations of gesture, speech, song, music or dance. Elements of design and stagecraft are used to enhance the physicality, presence and immediacy of the experience. The specific place of the performance is also named by the word "theatre" as derived from the Ancient Greek θέατρον, itself from θεάομαι. Modern Western theatre derives in large measure from ancient Greek drama, from which it borrows technical terminology, classification into genres, and many of its themes, stock characters, and plot elements. Theatre scholar Patrice Pavis defines theatricality, theatrical language, stage writing, and the specificity of theatre as synonymous expressions that differentiate theatre from the other performing arts, literature, and the arts in general. Theatre today includes performances of plays and musicals. Although it can be defined broadly to include opera and ballet, those art forms are outside the scope of this article.

Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

  1. Theatre

    thē′a-tėr, n. a place where public representations, chiefly dramatic or musical, are seen, a play-house: any place rising by steps like the seats of a theatre: a building adapted for scholastic exercises, anatomical demonstrations, &c.: scene of action, field of operations: the drama, the stage.—adjs. Theat′ric, -al, relating or suitable to a theatre, or to actors: pompous: artificial, affected.—v.t. and v.i. Theat′ricalise, to adapt to dramatic representation: to make stagy.—ns. Theat′ricalism, Theatrical′ity, staginess, artificiality.—adv. Theat′rically, in a theatrical manner: in a manner suiting the stage.—n. Theat′ricalness.—n.pl. Theat′ricals, dramatic performances.—v.i. Theat′ricise, to play a part.—ns. Theat′ricism, theatricality, affectation, staginess; Theatromā′nia, a craze for play-going; Theat′rophone, a telephone connected with a theatre. [Gr. theatrontheaomai, I see.]

Suggested Resources

  1. theatre

    The theatre symbol -- In this Symbols.com article you will learn about the meaning of the theatre symbol and its characteristic.

  2. Theatre

    Theater vs. Theatre -- In this Grammar.com article you will learn the differences between the words Theater and Theatre.

British National Corpus

  1. Spoken Corpus Frequency

    Rank popularity for the word 'theatre' in Spoken Corpus Frequency: #1799

  2. Written Corpus Frequency

    Rank popularity for the word 'theatre' in Written Corpus Frequency: #1769

  3. Nouns Frequency

    Rank popularity for the word 'theatre' in Nouns Frequency: #727

Anagrams for theatre »

  1. hat tree

  2. hattree

  3. teareth

  4. tethera

  5. theater

  6. thereat

How to pronounce theatre?

How to say theatre in sign language?

Numerology

  1. Chaldean Numerology

    The numerical value of theatre in Chaldean Numerology is: 8

  2. Pythagorean Numerology

    The numerical value of theatre in Pythagorean Numerology is: 5

Examples of theatre in a Sentence

  1. Barbara Mitchell:

    I don't believe there's anything that is connected( to the New Theatre outbreak) but we don't know that as of yet either.

  2. Antonin Artaud:

    The theater, which is in no thing, but makes use of everything -- gestures, sounds, words, screams, light, darkness -- rediscovers itself at precisely the point where the mind requires a language to express its manifestations. To break through language in order to touch life is to create or recreate the theatre.

  3. Brian Moreland:

    I don't think theatre will go away. I just think it will be different when it comes back.

  4. Phoebe Waller-Bridge:

    I hope this filmed performance of' Fleabag' can help raise money while providing a little theatrical entertainment in these isolated times, thank you to all our partners and to the creative team who have waived their royalties from this production to raise money for such vital causes in this unbelievably challenging situation. All money raised will support the people throughout our society who are fighting for us on the frontlines and those financially devastated by the crisis, including those in the theatre community.

  5. Bruce Barnes:

    Our board of trustees, staff, and members are thrilled that this wonderful sculpture of Philip Seymour Hoffman has been placed at our Dryden Theatre, since the museum was founded, one of our key missions has been to preserve and exhibit motion pictures, and this statue enables us to recognize Hoffman’s extraordinary contribution to the art of cinema.

Popularity rank by frequency of use

theatre#1#2362#10000

Translations for theatre

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"theatre." Definitions.net. STANDS4 LLC, 2024. Web. 13 Apr. 2024. <https://www.definitions.net/definition/theatre>.

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