What does tender mean?

Definitions for tender
ˈtɛn dərten·der

Here are all the possible meanings and translations of the word tender.

Princeton's WordNet

  1. tender, legal tender, stampnoun

    something that can be used as an official medium of payment

  2. attendant, attender, tendernoun

    someone who waits on or tends to or attends to the needs of another

  3. bid, tendernoun

    a formal proposal to buy at a specified price

  4. tendernoun

    car attached to a locomotive to carry fuel and water

  5. tender, ship's boat, pinnace, cutternoun

    a boat for communication between ship and shore

  6. tender, supply shipadjective

    ship that usually provides supplies to other ships

  7. tenderadjective

    given to sympathy or gentleness or sentimentality

    "a tender heart"; "a tender smile"; "tender loving care"; "tender memories"; "a tender mother"

  8. sensitive, sore, raw, tenderadjective

    hurting

    "the tender spot on his jaw"

  9. tenderadjective

    young and immature

    "at a tender age"

  10. affectionate, fond, lovesome, tender, warmadjective

    having or displaying warmth or affection

    "affectionate children"; "a fond embrace"; "fond of his nephew"; "a tender glance"; "a warm embrace"

  11. tenderadjective

    easy to cut or chew

    "tender beef"

  12. tender, untoughenedadjective

    physically untoughened

    "tender feet"

  13. crank, cranky, tender, tippyadjective

    (used of boats) inclined to heel over easily under sail

  14. tenderverb

    (of plants) not hardy; easily killed by adverse growing condition

    "tender green shoots"

  15. tenderverb

    offer or present for acceptance

  16. offer, bid, tenderverb

    propose a payment

    "The Swiss dealer offered $2 million for the painting"

  17. tenderverb

    make a tender of; in legal settlements

  18. tender, tenderize, tenderiseverb

    make tender or more tender as by marinating, pounding, or applying a tenderizer

    "tenderize meat"

Samuel Johnson's Dictionary

  1. TENDERadjective

    Etymology: tendre, French.

    The earth brought forth the tender grass. John Milton.

    From each tender stalk she gathers. John Milton.

    Unneath may she endure the flinty street,
    To tread them with her tender feeling feet. William Shakespeare.

    Leah was tender eyed, but Rachael was well-favoured. Gen. xxix. 17.

    Our bodies are not naturally more tender than our faces;
    but by being less exposed to the air, they become less able to endure it. Roger L'Estrange.

    The face when we are born is no less tender than any other part of the body: it is use alone hardens it, and makes it more able to endure the cold. John Locke, on Education.

    When Cyrus had overcome the Lydians, that were a warlike nation, and devised to bring them to a more peaceable life, instead of their short warlike coat he clothed them in long garments like women, and instead of their warlike musick appointed to them certain lascivious lays, by which their minds were so mollified and abated, that they forgot their former fierceness, and became most tender and effeminate. Edmund Spenser, on Ireland.

    I love Valentine;
    His life’s as tender to me as my soul. William Shakespeare.

    The tender kindness of the church it well beseemeth to help the weaker sort, although some few of the perfecter and stronger be for a time displeased. Richard Hooker, b.v.

    This not mistrust but tender love injoins. John Milton.

    Be tender hearted and compassionate towards those in want, and ready to relieve them. John Tillotson, Sermons.

    Your tears a heart of flint
    Might tender make, yet nought
    Herein they will prevail. Edmund Spenser.

    What mad lover ever dy’d,
    To gain a soft and gentle bride?
    Or for a lady tender hearted,
    In purling streams or hemp departed? Hudibras, p. iii.

    The civil authority should be tender of the honour of God and religion. John Tillotson, Sermons.

    As I have been tender of every particular person’s reputation, so I have taken care not to give offence. Addison.

    Thy tender hefted nature shall not give
    Thee o’er to harshness; her eyes are fierce, but thine
    Do comfort and not burn. William Shakespeare, King Lear.

    You, that are thus so tender o’er his follies,
    Will never do him good. William Shakespeare, Winter’s Tale.

    In things that are tender and unpleasing, break the ice by some whose words are of less weight, and reserve the more weighty voice to come in as by chance. Francis Bacon.

    When yet he was but tender bodied, a mother should not sell him. William Shakespeare, Coriolanus.

  2. Tendernoun

    Etymology: from the verb.

    Then to have a wretched puling fool,
    A whining mammet, in her fortune’s tender,
    To answer I’ll not wed. William Shakespeare, Romeo and Juliet.

    Think yourself a baby;
    That you have ta’en his tenders for true pay,
    Which are not sterling. William Shakespeare, Hamlet.

    The earl accepted the tenders of my service. Dryden.

    To declare the calling of the Gentiles by a free, unlimited tender of the gospel to all. Robert South, Sermons.

    Our tenders of duty every now and then miscarry. Addison.

    Thou hast shew’d thou mak’st some tender of my life,
    In this fair rescue thou hast brought to me. William Shakespeare.

  3. To Tenderverb

    Etymology: tendre, French.

    Some of the chiefest laity professed with greater stomach their judgments, that such a discipline was little better than popish tyranny, disguised and tendered unto them. Richard Hooker.

    I crave no more than what your highness offer’d;
    Nor will you tender less. William Shakespeare, King Lear.

    All conditions, all minds, tender down
    Their service to lord Timon. William Shakespeare.

    Owe not all creatures by just right to thee
    Duty and service, not to stay till bid,
    But tender all their pow’r? John Milton, Par. Regain’d.

    Tender yourself more dearly;
    Or, not to crack the wind of the poor phrase,
    Wringing it thus, you’ll tender me a fool. William Shakespeare.

    I thank you, madam, that you tender her:
    Poor gentlewoman, my master wrongs her much. William Shakespeare.

Webster Dictionary

  1. Tendernoun

    one who tends; one who takes care of any person or thing; a nurse

  2. Tendernoun

    a vessel employed to attend other vessels, to supply them with provisions and other stores, to convey intelligence, or the like

  3. Tendernoun

    a car attached to a locomotive, for carrying a supply of fuel and water

  4. Tenderverb

    to offer in payment or satisfaction of a demand, in order to save a penalty or forfeiture; as, to tender the amount of rent or debt

  5. Tenderverb

    to offer in words; to present for acceptance

  6. Tendernoun

    an offer, either of money to pay a debt, or of service to be performed, in order to save a penalty or forfeiture, which would be incurred by nonpayment or nonperformance; as, the tender of rent due, or of the amount of a note, with interest

  7. Tendernoun

    any offer or proposal made for acceptance; as, a tender of a loan, of service, or of friendship; a tender of a bid for a contract

  8. Tendernoun

    the thing offered; especially, money offered in payment of an obligation

  9. Tender

    easily impressed, broken, bruised, or injured; not firm or hard; delicate; as, tender plants; tender flesh; tender fruit

  10. Tender

    sensible to impression and pain; easily pained

  11. Tender

    physically weak; not hardly or able to endure hardship; immature; effeminate

  12. Tender

    susceptible of the softer passions, as love, compassion, kindness; compassionate; pitiful; anxious for another's good; easily excited to pity, forgiveness, or favor; sympathetic

  13. Tender

    exciting kind concern; dear; precious

  14. Tender

    careful to save inviolate, or not to injure; -- with of

  15. Tender

    unwilling to cause pain; gentle; mild

  16. Tender

    adapted to excite feeling or sympathy; expressive of the softer passions; pathetic; as, tender expressions; tender expostulations; a tender strain

  17. Tender

    apt to give pain; causing grief or pain; delicate; as, a tender subject

  18. Tender

    heeling over too easily when under sail; -- said of a vessel

  19. Tendernoun

    regard; care; kind concern

  20. Tenderverb

    to have a care of; to be tender toward; hence, to regard; to esteem; to value

Freebase

  1. Tender

    "Tender" is a song by English alternative rock band Blur.

Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

  1. Tender

    ten′dėr, v.t. to stretch out or offer for acceptance, esp. to offer to supply certain commodities for a certain period at rates specified.—n. an offer or proposal, esp. of some service, also the paper containing it: the thing offered, the actual production and formal offer of a sum due in legal money, or an offer of services to be performed, in order to save the consequences of non-payment or non-performance.

  2. Tender

    ten′dėr, adj. soft, delicate: easily impressed or injured: not hardy: fragile: weak and feeble: easily moved to pity, love, &c.: careful not to injure (with of): unwilling to cause pain: apt to cause pain: pathetic, expressive of the softer passions: compassionate, loving, affectionate: young and inexperienced: weakly in health: delicate, requiring careful handling: quick, keen: apt to lean over under sail.—n. Ten′der-foot, one not yet hardened to life in the prairie, mining-camp, &c.: a new-comer.—adj. Ten′der-heart′ed, full of feeling.—adv. Ten′der-heart′edly.—n. Ten′der-heart′edness.—adj. Ten′der-heft′ed (Shak.), having great tenderness.—ns. Ten′derling, one too much coddled, an effeminate fellow: one of the first horns of a deer; Ten′der-loin, the tenderest part of the loin of beef, pork, &c., lying close to the ventral side of the lumbar vertebræ.—adv. Ten′derly.—n. Ten′derness. [Fr. tendre—L. tener, allied to tenuis, thin.]

Dictionary of Nautical Terms

  1. tender

    A small vessel duly commanded, and employed to attend a larger one, to supply her with stores, to carry intelligence or volunteers and impressed men to receiving ships, &c. An enemy's ship captured by cutters or boats fitted out as tenders by men-of-war, but without any commission or authority from the admiralty, will not insure a prize to the benefit of the ship. The condemnation will be as a droit of admiralty, on the principle that an officer does not retain his commission for the purposes of prize on board another ship; but if captured by one of her boats, and brought to the ship, she is good prize, as with slaves. Tender is also a synonym of crank; thus, a spar may be tender.

Suggested Resources

  1. tender

    Song lyrics by tender -- Explore a large variety of song lyrics performed by tender on the Lyrics.com website.

British National Corpus

  1. Adjectives Frequency

    Rank popularity for the word 'tender' in Adjectives Frequency: #862

Anagrams for tender »

  1. denter

  2. rented

How to pronounce tender?

How to say tender in sign language?

Numerology

  1. Chaldean Numerology

    The numerical value of tender in Chaldean Numerology is: 7

  2. Pythagorean Numerology

    The numerical value of tender in Pythagorean Numerology is: 3

Examples of tender in a Sentence

  1. Chairman Robert Coury:

    As long as Mylan's share price is going up the opportunity becomes larger and larger and larger, people don't tender until the last 24 hours so we have quite a very very strong chance for a lot of activity in the last week.

  2. Pascal Couasnon:

    If the sport decides to stay with 13 inch, we respect it but it would not make sense to us, that’s where we are going to wait for the next time( the contract is up for tender).

  3. Edgar Allan Poe:

    Children are never too tender to be whipped. Like tough beefsteaks, the more you beat them, the more tender they become.

  4. Erin Dunbar:

    This is an unbelievably tender topic to talk about with our patients because when someone is diagnosed with a glioblastoma, it is a tremendous left turn in their life. They have been told they have a highly aggressive, incurable tumor that will undoubtedly shorten their life, barring a miracle.

  5. George Washington Carver:

    How far you go in life depends on you being tender with the young, compassionate with the aged, sympathetic with the striving and tolerant of the weak and the strong. Because someday in life you will have been all of these.

Popularity rank by frequency of use

tender#1#6740#10000

Translations for tender

From our Multilingual Translation Dictionary

  • غضArabic
  • tendreCatalan, Valencian
  • něžnýCzech
  • mør, øm, forsyningsskib, tenderDanish
  • zart, liebevoll, lieb, zärtlich, empfindlichGerman
  • esquife, oferta, dolorido, tierno, [[vagón]] [[nodriza]], propuesta, cariñoso, ofrecerSpanish
  • تردPersian
  • tenderi, hellä, esittää, tarjota, arka, maksuväline, aristava, emälaiva, tarjous, yhteysvene, mureaFinnish
  • tendre, offreFrench
  • grámhar, mínIrish
  • निविदाHindi
  • presentare, fare una offerta, soffice, dare, offrire, offerta, morbido, tender, valuta, dolce, scialuppa, moneta, [[gara]] d’[[appalto]], tenero, sottoporre, sensibile, carino, tenera, battere, delicatoItalian
  • מִכרָזHebrew
  • 過敏, 柔らかい, 炭水車, 優しいJapanese
  • ಟೆಂಡರ್Kannada
  • 연한Korean
  • tenerLatin
  • zaartLuxembourgish, Letzeburgesch
  • mateoha, pāwera, tono, tāngohengoheMāori
  • betalingsmiddel, tilbud, anbudNorwegian
  • zacht, betalingsmiddel, bod, lief, tender, gevoelig, aanbieden, mals, biedenDutch
  • tender, środek płatniczy, oferta, przetargowy, delikatnyPolish
  • tenro, terno, tênder, macioPortuguese
  • dulce, gentil, iubitRomanian
  • уязвимый, предлагать, нежный, ласковый, тендер, [[платёжный, чувствительный, [[плавучий, предложениеRussian
  • öm, mör, ljuv, erbjudaSwedish
  • ஒப்பந்தம்Tamil
  • లేతTelugu
  • อ่อนโยนThai
  • mềmVietnamese

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1 Comment
  • J A Y Twiprasa
    J A Y Twiprasa
    flop .... no need
    LikeReplyReport5 years ago

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closely constrained or constricted or constricting
  • A. tight
  • B. transparent
  • C. dependable
  • D. abrupt

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