What does teeth mean?

Definitions for teeth
tiθteeth

Here are all the possible meanings and translations of the word teeth.

Princeton's WordNet

  1. dentition, teethnoun

    the kind and number and arrangement of teeth (collectively) in a person or animal

Wiktionary

  1. teethnoun

    The ability to be enforced, or to be enforced to any useful effect.

  2. Etymology: teþ, nominative plural of toþ.

Samuel Johnson's Dictionary

  1. Teeththe plural of tooth.

    Who can open the doors of his face? his teeth are terrible round about. Job xli. 14.

  2. To Teethverb

    To breed teeth; to be at the time of dentition.

    Etymology: from the noun.

    When the symptoms of teething appear, the gums ought to be relaxed by softening ointment. John Arbuthnot, on Diet.

Wikipedia

  1. teeth

    A tooth (PL: teeth) is a hard, calcified structure found in the jaws (or mouths) of many vertebrates and used to break down food. Some animals, particularly carnivores and omnivores, also use teeth to help with capturing or wounding prey, tearing food, for defensive purposes, to intimidate other animals often including their own, or to carry prey or their young. The roots of teeth are covered by gums. Teeth are not made of bone, but rather of multiple tissues of varying density and hardness that originate from the embryonic germ layer, the ectoderm. The general structure of teeth is similar across the vertebrates, although there is considerable variation in their form and position. The teeth of mammals have deep roots, and this pattern is also found in some fish, and in crocodilians. In most teleost fish, however, the teeth are attached to the outer surface of the bone, while in lizards they are attached to the inner surface of the jaw by one side. In cartilaginous fish, such as sharks, the teeth are attached by tough ligaments to the hoops of cartilage that form the jaw.Some animals develop only one set of teeth (monophyodonts) while others are diphyodonts, i.e. they have an early set of deciduous teeth and a later set of permanent or "adult" teeth. Still others develop many sets (polyphyodonts). Sharks, for example, grow a new set of teeth every two weeks to replace worn teeth. Most extant mammals including humans are diphyodonts, but there are exceptions including elephants, kangaroos, and manatees, all of which are polyphyodonts. Rodent incisors grow and wear away continually through gnawing, which helps maintain relatively constant length. The industry of the beaver is due in part to this qualification. Many rodents such as voles and guinea pigs, but not mice, as well as leporidae like rabbits, have continuously growing molars in addition to incisors. Also, tusks (in tusked mammals) grow almost throughout life.Teeth are not always attached to the jaw, as they are in mammals. In many reptiles and fish, teeth are attached to the palate or to the floor of the mouth, forming additional rows inside those on the jaws proper. Some teleosts even have teeth in the pharynx. While not true teeth in the usual sense, the dermal denticles of sharks are almost identical in structure and are likely to have the same evolutionary origin. Indeed, teeth appear to have first evolved in sharks, and are not found in the more primitive jawless fish – while lampreys do have tooth-like structures on the tongue, these are in fact, composed of keratin, not of dentine or enamel, and bear no relationship to true teeth. Though "modern" teeth-like structures with dentine and enamel have been found in late conodonts, they are now supposed to have evolved independently of later vertebrates' teeth.Living amphibians typically have small teeth, or none at all, since they commonly feed only on soft foods. In reptiles, teeth are generally simple and conical in shape, although there is some variation between species, most notably the venom-injecting fangs of snakes. The pattern of incisors, canines, premolars and molars is found only in mammals, and to varying extents, in their evolutionary ancestors. The numbers of these types of teeth vary greatly between species; zoologists use a standardised dental formula to describe the precise pattern in any given group.

Webster Dictionary

  1. Teethnoun

    pl. of Tooth

  2. Teethverb

    to breed, or grow, teeth

  3. Teeth

    of Tooth

Freebase

  1. Teeth

    Teeth is a 2007 comedy horror film written and directed by Mitchell Lichtenstein about a teenage girl who has teeth in her vagina. It premiered January 19, 2007, at the 2007 Sundance Film Festival in the independent drama category. It was released on DVD in the United States on May 6, 2007, by Dimension Extreme.

Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

  1. Teeth

    See Tooth.

Dictionary of Nautical Terms

  1. teeth

    A name for the guns in a ship.

Editors Contribution

  1. teeth

    Plural form of the word tooth.

    It is important to brush our teeth daily and floss also.


    Submitted by MaryC on May 23, 2020  

Matched Categories

British National Corpus

  1. Spoken Corpus Frequency

    Rank popularity for the word 'teeth' in Spoken Corpus Frequency: #2236

  2. Written Corpus Frequency

    Rank popularity for the word 'teeth' in Written Corpus Frequency: #1971

How to pronounce teeth?

How to say teeth in sign language?

Numerology

  1. Chaldean Numerology

    The numerical value of teeth in Chaldean Numerology is: 5

  2. Pythagorean Numerology

    The numerical value of teeth in Pythagorean Numerology is: 4

Examples of teeth in a Sentence

  1. Meryl Streep:

    There was one performance this year that stunned me, it sank its hooks in my heart. Not because it was good. There was nothing good about it. But it was effective, and it did its job. It made its intended audience laugh and show their teeth.

  2. Indiana Right to Life:

    The bill fails substantively in many areas, including its failure to provide any meaningful enforcement provisions. This bill goes through the motions on paper, but lacks any teeth to actually reduce abortions in Indiana by holding those who perform abortions or would intentionally skirt the law accountable with criminal consequences.

  3. Terri Burke:

    The executive order Trump signed had no teeth to it. But these bills working their way to the Texas legislature are real and they are going to do real damage to real people.

  4. Vicente Lim:

    No great man will ever succeed in life if they do not grind their teeth and take the most dangerous path for the attainment of an end.

  5. Ashleigh Haruda:

    We could see that it had lost its canines and some of its other teeth completely and that the tooth roots had healed over, the loss of these teeth would have made it difficult for the cat to hunt successfully.

Popularity rank by frequency of use

teeth#1#6279#10000

Translations for teeth

From our Multilingual Translation Dictionary

Get even more translations for teeth »

Translation

Find a translation for the teeth definition in other languages:

Select another language:

  • - Select -
  • 简体中文 (Chinese - Simplified)
  • 繁體中文 (Chinese - Traditional)
  • Español (Spanish)
  • Esperanto (Esperanto)
  • 日本語 (Japanese)
  • Português (Portuguese)
  • Deutsch (German)
  • العربية (Arabic)
  • Français (French)
  • Русский (Russian)
  • ಕನ್ನಡ (Kannada)
  • 한국어 (Korean)
  • עברית (Hebrew)
  • Gaeilge (Irish)
  • Українська (Ukrainian)
  • اردو (Urdu)
  • Magyar (Hungarian)
  • मानक हिन्दी (Hindi)
  • Indonesia (Indonesian)
  • Italiano (Italian)
  • தமிழ் (Tamil)
  • Türkçe (Turkish)
  • తెలుగు (Telugu)
  • ภาษาไทย (Thai)
  • Tiếng Việt (Vietnamese)
  • Čeština (Czech)
  • Polski (Polish)
  • Bahasa Indonesia (Indonesian)
  • Românește (Romanian)
  • Nederlands (Dutch)
  • Ελληνικά (Greek)
  • Latinum (Latin)
  • Svenska (Swedish)
  • Dansk (Danish)
  • Suomi (Finnish)
  • فارسی (Persian)
  • ייִדיש (Yiddish)
  • հայերեն (Armenian)
  • Norsk (Norwegian)
  • English (English)

Word of the Day

Would you like us to send you a FREE new word definition delivered to your inbox daily?

Please enter your email address:


Discuss these teeth definitions with the community:

0 Comments

    Citation

    Use the citation below to add this definition to your bibliography:

    Style:MLAChicagoAPA

    "teeth." Definitions.net. STANDS4 LLC, 2023. Web. 6 Feb. 2023. <https://www.definitions.net/definition/teeth>.

    Are we missing a good definition for teeth? Don't keep it to yourself...

    Image or illustration of

    teeth

    Credit »

    Browse Definitions.net

    Free, no signup required:

    Add to Chrome

    Get instant definitions for any word that hits you anywhere on the web!

    Free, no signup required:

    Add to Firefox

    Get instant definitions for any word that hits you anywhere on the web!

    Quiz

    Are you a words master?

    »
    a person who pays more attention to formal rules and book learning than they merit
    • A. leaven
    • B. encumbrance
    • C. crate
    • D. scholastic

    Nearby & related entries:

    Alternative searches for teeth: