What does sweetness mean?

Definitions for sweetness
sweet·ness

This dictionary definitions page includes all the possible meanings, example usage and translations of the word sweetness.

Princeton's WordNet

  1. sweet, sweetness, sugarinessnoun

    the taste experience when sugar dissolves in the mouth

  2. sweetness, sweetnoun

    the property of tasting as if it contains sugar

  3. bouquet, fragrance, fragrancy, redolence, sweetnessnoun

    a pleasingly sweet olfactory property

  4. pleasantness, sweetnessnoun

    the quality of giving pleasure

    "he was charmed by the sweetness of her manner"; "the pleasantness of a cool breeze on a hot summer day"

Wiktionary

  1. sweetnessnoun

    The condition of being sweet or sugary.

  2. sweetnessnoun

    A pleasant disposition; kindness.

    Ruth's overwhelming sweetness made Robert forget about his hopelessly low school grades.

Samuel Johnson's Dictionary

  1. Sweetnessnoun

    The quality of being sweet in any of its senses; fragrance; melody; lusciousness; deliciousness; agreeableness; delightfulness; gentleness of manners; mildness of aspect.

    Etymology: from sweet.

    She the sweetness of my heart, even sweetning the death which her sweetness brought upon me. Philip Sidney.

    The right form, the true figure, the natural colour that is fit and due to the dignity of a man, to the beauty of a woman, to the sweetness of a young babe. Roger Ascham.

    O our lives sweetness!
    That we the pain of death would hourly bear,
    Rather than die at once. William Shakespeare, King Lear.

    Where a rainbow toucheth, there breatheth forth a sweet smell: for this happeneth but in certain matters, which have in themselves some sweetness, which the gentle dew of the rainbow draweth forth. Francis Bacon.

    Serene and clear harmonious Quintus Horatius Flaccus flows,
    With sweetness not to be exprest in prose. Wentworth Dillon.

    Suppose two authors equally sweet, there is a great distinction to be made in sweetness; as in that of sugar and that of honey. Dryden.

    This old man’s talk, though honey flow’d
    In every word, would now lose all its sweetness. Addison.

    Leave such to tune their own dull rhymes, and know
    What’s roundly smooth, or languishingly slow;
    And praise the easy vigor of a line,
    Where Denham’s strength and Waller’s sweetness join. Alexander Pope.

    A man of good education, excellent understanding, and exact taste; these qualities are adorned with great modesty and a most amiable sweetness of temper. Jonathan Swift.

Wikipedia

  1. Sweetness

    Sweetness is a basic taste most commonly perceived when eating foods rich in sugars. Sweet tastes are generally regarded as pleasurable, except when in excess. In addition to sugars like sucrose, many other chemical compounds are sweet, including aldehydes, ketones, and sugar alcohols. Some are sweet at very low concentrations, allowing their use as non-caloric sugar substitutes. Such non-sugar sweeteners include saccharin and aspartame. Other compounds, such as miraculin, may alter perception of sweetness itself. The perceived intensity of sugars and high-potency sweeteners, such as aspartame and neohesperidin dihydrochalcone, are heritable, with gene effect accounting for approximately 30% of the variation.The chemosensory basis for detecting sweetness, which varies between both individuals and species, has only begun to be understood since the late 20th century. One theoretical model of sweetness is the multipoint attachment theory, which involves multiple binding sites between a sweetness receptor and a sweet substance. Studies indicate that responsiveness to sugars and sweetness has very ancient evolutionary beginnings, being manifest as chemotaxis even in motile bacteria such as E. coli. Newborn human infants also demonstrate preferences for high sugar concentrations and prefer solutions that are sweeter than lactose, the sugar found in breast milk. Sweetness appears to have the highest taste recognition threshold, being detectable at around 1 part in 200 of sucrose in solution. By comparison, bitterness appears to have the lowest detection threshold, at about 1 part in 2 million for quinine in solution. In the natural settings that human primate ancestors evolved in, sweetness intensity should indicate energy density, while bitterness tends to indicate toxicity. The high sweetness detection threshold and low bitterness detection threshold would have predisposed our primate ancestors to seek out sweet-tasting (and energy-dense) foods and avoid bitter-tasting foods. Even amongst leaf-eating primates, there is a tendency to prefer immature leaves, which tend to be higher in protein and lower in fibre and poisons than mature leaves. The 'sweet tooth' thus has an ancient evolutionary heritage, and while food processing has changed consumption patterns, human physiology remains largely unchanged.

ChatGPT

  1. sweetness

    Sweetness is a basic taste sensation perceived when certain substances come into contact with specific receptors on the tongue. It is typically associated with substances such as sugar or honey that are also often associated with pleasure and gratification. In a broader sense, 'sweetness' can also refer to the quality of being kind, gentle, pleasant or charming in behavior or character.

Webster Dictionary

  1. Sweetnessnoun

    the quality or state of being sweet (in any sense of the adjective); gratefulness to the taste or to the smell; agreeableness

  2. Etymology: [AS. swtness.]

Wikidata

  1. Sweetness

    Sweetness is one of the five basic tastes and is almost universally regarded as a pleasurable experience. Foods rich in simple carbohydrates such as sugar are those most commonly associated with sweetness, although there are other natural and artificial compounds that are sweet at much lower concentrations, allowing their use as non-caloric sugar substitutes. Examples of foods that may be used as non-sugar sweet substitutes include saccharin, aspartame, xylitol and acesulfame K. Other compounds may alter perception of sweetness itself. The chemosensory basis for detecting sweetness, which varies among both individuals and species, has only been teased apart in recent years. A recent theoretical model of sweetness is the multipoint attachment theory, which involves multiple binding sites between a sweetness receptor and a sweet substance. Studies indicate that responsiveness to sugars and sweetness has very ancient evolutionary beginnings, being manifest as chemotaxis even in motile bacteria such as E. coli. Newborn human infants also demonstrate preferences for high sugar concentrations and prefer solutions that are sweeter than lactose, the sugar found in breast milk. Sweetness appears to have the highest taste recognition threshold, being detectable at around 1 part in 200 of sucrose in solution. By comparison, bitterness appears to have the lowest detection threshold, at about 1 part in 2 million for quinine in solution. In the natural settings that human primate ancestors evolved in, sweetness intensity should indicate energy density, while bitterness tends to indicate toxicity The high sweetness detection threshold and low bitterness detection threshold would have predisposed our primate ancestors to seek out sweet-tasting foods and avoid bitter-tasting foods. Even amongst leaf-eating primates, there is a tendency to prefer immature leaves, which tend to be higher in protein and lower in fibre and poisons than mature leaves. The 'sweet tooth' thus has an ancient evolutionary heritage, and while food processing has changed consumption patterns, human physiology remains largely unchanged.

Suggested Resources

  1. sweetness

    Song lyrics by sweetness -- Explore a large variety of song lyrics performed by sweetness on the Lyrics.com website.

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Numerology

  1. Chaldean Numerology

    The numerical value of sweetness in Chaldean Numerology is: 3

  2. Pythagorean Numerology

    The numerical value of sweetness in Pythagorean Numerology is: 3

Examples of sweetness in a Sentence

  1. Gail Vance Civille:

    It is what adds interest to food, even if it's a sweet food, because it makes the sugar and other ingredients taste better and come together better, a pinch of salt in cookies really makes a difference, and it enhances sweetness a little bit.

  2. JANET-GRACE- ESSON SCOTT- POWERHOUSE SOPRANO FROM JAMAICA.:

    lord I see the sun is shining, the rain is falling my prayer in music ministry is to share this god given voice in enriching the lives of people in these life struggles. lord, it is the sweetness of your love.

  3. Sara Gottfried:

    Most people were told to eat nine servings of fresh fruit and vegetables a day, but I can tell you most women are eating a lot of fruit-- and they’re not eating the kind of fruit my great grandmother ate. An apple in her day had 2 grams of fructose, which is what makes fruit sweet. An apple today has been hybridized for sweetness. It’s more like a sugar bomb and has typically 20-25 grams of fructose. So what we want to do is steer away from the high fructose fruit and eat things like olives and avocados which are much better for your hormones.

  4. Amit Ray:

    Enlightenment is the transforming process that makes one kind, happy, and compassionate to the world. Enlightenment is bringing greatness in our ordinary life. Enlightenment is bringing beauty in our words, actions, breath and thoughts. Enlightenment is unfolding our true divinity. Enlightenment is bringing sweetness in our relationships. Enlightenment is making friendship with the whole existence. Enlightenment is making the whole existence as the center of your heart.

  5. Eva Longoria:

    The sweetness of this bright purple beet puree balances the tomatoes’ acidity.

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Translations for sweetness

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"sweetness." Definitions.net. STANDS4 LLC, 2024. Web. 22 Jun 2024. <https://www.definitions.net/definition/sweetness>.

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    A observe
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