What does suburb mean?

Definitions for suburb
ˈsʌb ɜrbsub·urb

Here are all the possible meanings and translations of the word suburb.

Princeton's WordNet

  1. suburb, suburbia, suburban areanoun

    a residential district located on the outskirts of a city

Wiktionary

  1. suburbnoun

    the area on the periphery of a city or large town that falls between being truly part of the city, but is not countryside either.

  2. suburbnoun

    (Australian and New Zealand English) any subdivision of a conurbation, not necessarily on the periphery.

  3. Etymology: From suburbe, subburbe, from suburbium, from sub- + urbs.

Samuel Johnson's Dictionary

  1. SUBURBnoun

    Etymology: suburbium, Latin.

    There’s a trim rabble let in: are all these your faithful friends o’ th’ suburbs? William Shakespeare, Henry VIII.

    What can be more to the disvaluation of the power of the Spaniard, than to have marched seven days in the heart of his countries, and lodged three nights in the suburbs of his principal city? Francis Bacon, War with Spain.

    The suburbs of my jacket are so gone,
    I have not left one skirt to sit upon. John Cleveland.

    They on the smoothed plank,
    The suburb of their strawbuilt citadel,
    Expatiate. John Milton.

    When our fortunes are violently changed, our spirits are unchanged, if they always stood in the suburbs and expectation of sorrows. Taylor.

Wikipedia

  1. Suburb

    A suburb, more broadly suburban area, is an area within a metropolitan area that is primarily a residential area, though may also include commercial and mixed-use areas. A suburb can exist either as part of a larger city/urban area or as a separate political entity. The name describes an area which is not as densely populated as an inner city, yet more densely populated than a rural area in the countryside. In many metropolitan areas, suburbs exist as separate residential communities within commuting distance of a city (cf "bedroom suburb".) Suburbs can have their own political or legal jurisdiction, especially in the United States, but this is not always the case, especially in the United Kingdom, where most suburbs are located within the administrative boundaries of cities. In most English-speaking countries, suburban areas are defined in contrast to central or inner city areas, but in Australian English and South African English, suburb has become largely synonymous with what is called a "neighborhood" in other countries, and the term encompasses inner city areas.In some areas, such as India, China, New Zealand, Canada, the United Kingdom, and parts of the United States, new suburbs are routinely annexed by adjacent cities due to urban sprawl. In others, such as Morocco, France, and much of the United States, many suburbs remain separate municipalities or are governed locally as part of a larger metropolitan area such as a county, district or borough. In the United States, regions beyond the suburbs are known as "exurban areas" or exurbs; exurbs have less population density than suburbs, but still more than rural areas. Suburbs and exurbs are linked to the nearby larger metropolitan area economically, particularly by commuters. Suburbs first emerged on a large scale in the 19th and 20th centuries as a result of improved rail and road transport, which led to an increase in commuting. In general, they are less densely populated than inner city neighborhoods within the same metropolitan area, and most residents routinely commute to city centers or business districts via private vehicles or public transits; however, there are many exceptions, including industrial suburbs, planned communities, and satellite cities. Suburbs tend to proliferate around cities that have an abundance of adjacent flat land.

Webster Dictionary

  1. Suburbnoun

    an outlying part of a city or town; a smaller place immediately adjacent to a city; in the plural, the region which is on the confines of any city or large town; as, a house stands in the suburbs; a garden situated in the suburbs of Paris

  2. Suburbnoun

    hence, the confines; the outer part; the environment

  3. Etymology: [L. suburbium; sub under, below, near + urbs a city. See Urban.]

Freebase

  1. Suburb

    A suburb is a residential area or a mixed use area, either existing as part of a city or urban area, or as a separate residential community within commuting distance of a city. Some suburbs have a degree of administrative autonomy, and most have lower population densities than inner city neighborhoods. Suburbs first emerged on a large scale in the 19th and 20th centuries as a result of improved rail and road transport, which led to an increase in commuting. Suburbs tend to proliferate around cities that have an abundance of adjacent flat land. Any particular suburban area is referred to as a suburb, while suburban areas on the whole are referred to as the suburbs or suburbia, with the demonym for a suburb-dweller being suburbanite. Colloquial usage sometimes shortens the term to burb.

Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

  1. Suburb

    sub′urb, Suburbs, sub′urbz, n. the district which is near but beyond the walls of a city: the confines, outskirts.—adj. Subur′ban, situated or living in the suburbs.—n. one living in a suburb.—n. Subur′banism, the state of being suburban.—adj. Suburbicā′rian, being near the city, esp. of the provinces of Italy forming the ancient diocese of Rome. [L. suburbiumsub, under, near, urbs, a city.]

British National Corpus

  1. Nouns Frequency

    Rank popularity for the word 'suburb' in Nouns Frequency: #2799

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Numerology

  1. Chaldean Numerology

    The numerical value of suburb in Chaldean Numerology is: 3

  2. Pythagorean Numerology

    The numerical value of suburb in Pythagorean Numerology is: 2

Examples of suburb in a Sentence

  1. Jerry Kilgore:

    Republicans have a lot of work to do. They have to be able to reach the suburbs with a message that's a winning message. They haven't been able to do that in several years now, those issues have to be issues that are based on the suburb's issues, which would be education, public safety, dealing with Covid.

  2. Javier Vivas:

    A fast-growing suburb gets that way by attracting builders—working up a business case for people to come in and build in their community.

  3. Hillary Clinton:

    I view this not just as an environmental disaster and a health crisis, this is a civil rights issue. I have said and I will repeat here today, if it had been a rich white suburb when the water was brown and smelly, people would immediately come to the rescue of those families.

  4. Bill Cosby:

    >( CNN) Bill Cosby has replaced his entire defense team ahead of his sentencing hearing in September.Cosby's attorney, Tom Mesereau, and the rest of his defense team were replaced by attorney Joseph P. Green, the comedian's spokesman Andrew Wyatt said. Andrew Wyatt did not elaborate on the reason for the change.CNN reached out to Green for comment but has not yet received a response.Cosby was found guilty in April of three counts of aggravated indecent assault for drugging and sexually assaulting Andrea Constand at his home in a Philadelphia suburb in 2004. Read MoreThe 80-year-old comedian is scheduled for a sentencing hearing on September 24. He faces up to 10 years in prison on each count, although the actual sentence is likely to be much shorter.The verdict came a year after Cosby's previous trial ended in a mistrial, as a different panel of jurors said they were deadlocked and could not unanimously agree on a verdict. What the case was aboutThe case against Bill Cosby centered on testimony from Constand, a former employee with Temple University women's basketball team. She testified that Bill Cosby, a powerful trustee at Temple University, drugged her and sexually assaulted her when she visited Bill Cosby home to ask for career advice 14 years ago.The trial had the.

  5. Nick Elsden:

    A large sample of the population from that period will enable us to look at the lifestyle, looking at Roman London and what the Romans were doing in the suburb area, outside the city walls. specialists will look at the DNA of the disease that killed the person rather than their own DNA.

Popularity rank by frequency of use

suburb#10000#13758#100000

Translations for suburb

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    without the natural or usual covering
    • A. abide
    • B. efface
    • C. abase
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