What does starch mean?

Definitions for starch
stɑrtʃstarch

Here are all the possible meanings and translations of the word starch.

Princeton's WordNet

  1. starch, amylumnoun

    a complex carbohydrate found chiefly in seeds, fruits, tubers, roots and stem pith of plants, notably in corn, potatoes, wheat, and rice; an important foodstuff and used otherwise especially in adhesives and as fillers and stiffeners for paper and textiles

  2. starchverb

    a commercial preparation of starch that is used to stiffen textile fabrics in laundering

  3. starchverb

    stiffen with starch

    "starch clothes"

Wiktionary

  1. starchnoun

    A widely diffused vegetable substance found especially in seeds, bulbs, and tubers, and extracted (as from potatoes, corn, rice, etc.) as a white, glistening, granular or powdery substance, without taste or smell, and giving a very peculiar creaking sound when rubbed between the fingers. It is used as a food, in the production of commercial grape sugar, for stiffening linen in laundries, in making paste, etc.

  2. starchnoun

    Carbohydrates, as with grain and potato based foods.

  3. starchnoun

    A stiff, formal manner; formality.

  4. starchnoun

    Any of various starch-like substances used as a laundry stiffener

  5. starchverb

    To apply or treat with laundry starch, to create a hard, smooth surface.

    She starched her blouses.

  6. starchadjective

    Stiff; precise; rigid.

  7. Etymology: stearc. See also stark. Compare German stärke.

Samuel Johnson's Dictionary

  1. STARCHnoun

    A kind of viscous matter made of flower or potatoes, with which linen is stiffened, and was formerly coloured.

    Etymology: from starc, Teutonick, stiff.

    Has he
    Dislik’d your yellow starch, or said your doublet
    Was not exactly Frenchified. John Fletcher, Queen of Corinth.

    With starch thin laid on, and the skin well stretched, prepare your ground. Henry Peacham, on Drawing.

  2. To Starchverb

    To stiffen with starch.

    Etymology: from the noun.

    Her goodly countenance I’ve seen
    Set off with kerchief starch’d and pinners clean. John Gay.

Webster Dictionary

  1. Starchadjective

    stiff; precise; rigid

  2. Starchnoun

    a widely diffused vegetable substance found especially in seeds, bulbs, and tubers, and extracted (as from potatoes, corn, rice, etc.) as a white, glistening, granular or powdery substance, without taste or smell, and giving a very peculiar creaking sound when rubbed between the fingers. It is used as a food, in the production of commercial grape sugar, for stiffening linen in laundries, in making paste, etc

  3. Starchnoun

    fig.: A stiff, formal manner; formality

  4. Starchverb

    to stiffen with starch

  5. Etymology: [From starch stiff, cf. G. strke, fr. stark strong.]

Freebase

  1. Starch

    Starch or amylum is a carbohydrate consisting of a large number of glucose units joined by glycosidic bonds. This polysaccharide is produced by all green plants as an energy store. It is the most common carbohydrate in the human diet and is contained in large amounts in such staple foods as potatoes, wheat, maize, rice, and cassava. Pure starch is a white, tasteless and odorless powder that is insoluble in cold water or alcohol. It consists of two types of molecules: the linear and helical amylose and the branched amylopectin. Depending on the plant, starch generally contains 20 to 25% amylose and 75 to 80% amylopectin by weight. Glycogen, the glucose store of animals, is a more branched version of amylopectin. Starch is processed to produce many of the sugars in processed foods. Dissolving starch in warm water gives wheatpaste, which can be used as a thickening, stiffening or gluing agent. The biggest industrial non-food use of starch is as adhesive in the papermaking process. Starch can be applied to parts of some garments before ironing, to stiffen them; this is less usual now than in the past.

Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

  1. Starch

    stärch, n. the pure fecula or white farinaceous matter of vegetables, yielding a translucent jelly used for stiffening clothes in the laundry: stiffness, formality.—adj. stiff, rigid, formal.—adj. Starched, stiffened with starch: formal.—adv. Starch′edly.—ns. Starch′edness; Starch′er; Starch′-hy′acinth, a plant allied to the hyacinth, so called from the smell of the flower.—adv. Starch′ily, in a starch or stiff manner: formally.—ns. Starch′iness, the state or quality of being starchy: stiffness of manner: formality; Starch′-su′gar, glucose.—adj. Starch′y, consisting of, or like, starch: stiff: precise. [A special use of adj. stark; cf. Ger. stärke, starch—stark, strong.]

U.S. National Library of Medicine

  1. Starch

    Any of a group of polysaccharides of the general formula (C6-H10-O5)n, composed of a long-chain polymer of glucose in the form of amylose and amylopectin. It is the chief storage form of energy reserve (carbohydrates) in plants.

Editors Contribution

  1. starch

    A type of carbohydrate.

    Starch can be found in plants, fruit and vegetables and is extracted and used for a variety of purposes.

    Submitted by MaryC on May 26, 2016  

Suggested Resources

  1. starch

    Song lyrics by starch -- Explore a large variety of song lyrics performed by starch on the Lyrics.com website.

Matched Categories

Anagrams for starch »

  1. charts, trachs

  2. Charts

  3. Trachs

How to pronounce starch?

How to say starch in sign language?

Numerology

  1. Chaldean Numerology

    The numerical value of starch in Chaldean Numerology is: 9

  2. Pythagorean Numerology

    The numerical value of starch in Pythagorean Numerology is: 6

Examples of starch in a Sentence

  1. Kara Landau:

    Unripe bananas contain one of the world’s richest sources of prebiotic resistant starch, which resists digestion as it travels through your gut and feeds the beneficial bacteria living in your large intestine. A well-nourished gut microbiota will multiply and diversity, leading to better gut health, good gut health is linked to reduced inflammation, improved immunity, enhanced nutrient absorption, a supported mood, and less digestive issues, all of which can help you look and feel younger! For those that do not like the taste and texture of unripe bananas, green banana flour contains resistant starch in a different form, and can easily be added to smoothies and overnight oats.

  2. Paradi Mirmirani:

    Dry shampoos use powder, starch, or talc to soak up oil, and none of those ingredients directly impact the ability of follicles to grow new hair.

  3. Shelley Aggarwal:

    Food is so much more than protein, starch, and vitamins and minerals, yet many people struggle to have fun with food.

  4. Kara Landau:

    Resistant starch is not digested as it travels through the gastrointestinal tract, instead, it is fermented by the beneficial bacteria living in the gut. This fermentation process releases byproducts that improve the body’s insulin response, which help to prevent fat stored around the abdomen. Abdominal fat is highly correlated with diabetes, and a waist circumference larger than 35 inches in women and 40 inches in men is a risk factor for heart disease.

  5. Alessio Fasano:

    This gentleman during World War II noted that the mortality of celiac disease was zero, and he didn't realize immediately why until when the war was over and the mortality went back to the pre-war era, something during the war that was missing was the culprit, and one of the commodities that was missing was wheat. As a matter of fact, flour during the war was made with potato starch and not with wheat.

Popularity rank by frequency of use

starch#10000#19898#100000

Translations for starch

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    a substance used to produce fermentation in dough or a liquid
    • A. crate
    • B. mitre
    • C. leaven
    • D. brasserie

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