What does sonnet mean?

Definitions for sonnet
ˈsɒn ɪtson·net

Here are all the possible meanings and translations of the word sonnet.

Princeton's WordNet

  1. sonnetverb

    a verse form consisting of 14 lines with a fixed rhyme scheme

  2. sonnetverb

    praise in a sonnet

  3. sonnetverb

    compose a sonnet

Wiktionary

  1. sonnetnoun

    A fixed verse form of Italian origin consisting of fourteen lines that are typically five-foot iambics and rhyme according to one of a few prescribed schemes.

Wikipedia

  1. Sonnet

    A sonnet is a poetic form which originated at the Court of the Holy Roman Emperor Frederick II in Palermo, Sicily. The 13th-century poet and notary Giacomo da Lentini is credited with the sonnet's invention and the Sicilian School of poets who surrounded him is credited with its spread. The earliest sonnets, however, no longer survive in the original Sicilian language, but only after being translated into Tuscan dialect. The term sonnet is derived from the Italian word sonetto (from Old Provençal sonet a little poem, from son song, from Latin sonus a sound). By the thirteenth century it signified a poem of fourteen lines that follows a strict rhyme scheme and specific structure. Conventions associated with the sonnet have evolved over its history. Writers of sonnets are sometimes called "sonneteers," although the term can be used derisively.

Webster Dictionary

  1. Sonnetnoun

    a short poem, -- usually amatory

    Etymology: [F., fr. It. sonetto, fr. suono a sound, a song, fr. L. sonus a sound. See Sound noise.]

  2. Sonnetnoun

    a poem of fourteen lines, -- two stanzas, called the octave, being of four verses each, and two stanzas, called the sestet, of three verses each, the rhymes being adjusted by a particular rule

    Etymology: [F., fr. It. sonetto, fr. suono a sound, a song, fr. L. sonus a sound. See Sound noise.]

  3. Sonnetverb

    to compose sonnets

    Etymology: [F., fr. It. sonetto, fr. suono a sound, a song, fr. L. sonus a sound. See Sound noise.]

Freebase

  1. Sonnet

    A sonnet is a poetic form which originated in Italy; the Sicilian poet Giacomo da Lentini is credited with its invention. The term sonnet derives from the Italian word sonetto, meaning "little song", and by the thirteenth century it signified a poem of fourteen lines that follows a strict rhyme scheme and specific structure. Conventions associated with the sonnet have evolved over its history. Writers of sonnets are sometimes called "sonneteers," although the term can be used derisively. One of the best-known sonnet writers is William Shakespeare, who wrote 154 of them. A Shakespearean, or English, sonnet consists of fourteen lines written in iambic pentameter, in which a pattern of an unstressed syllable followed by a stressed syllable is repeated five times. The rhyme scheme in a Shakespearean sonnet is a-b-a-b, c-d-c-d, e-f-e-f, g-g; the last two lines are a rhyming couplet. Traditionally, English poets employ iambic pentameter when writing sonnets, but not all English sonnets have the same metrical structure. The first sonnet in Sir Philip Sidney's sequence Astrophel and Stella, for example, has 12 syllables; these lines are iambic hexameters, albeit with an inverted first foot in several lines. In the Romance languages, the hendecasyllable and Alexandrine are the most widely used metres.

Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

  1. Sonnet

    son′et, n. a poem in a stanza mostly iambic in movement, properly decasyllabic or hendecasyllabic in metre, always in fourteen lines—originally composed of an octave and a sestet—properly expressing two successive phases of one thought.—v.t. and v.i. to celebrate in sonnets.—adj. Sonn′etary.—n. Sonneteer′, a composer of sonnets.—v.i. Sonn′etise, to compose sonnets.—v.t. to celebrate in a sonnet.—n. Sonn′etist (Shak.), a sonneteer. [Fr.,—It. sonetto, dim. of sonāre, a sound, song—L. sonus, a sound.]

The Nuttall Encyclopedia

  1. Sonnet

    a form of poetical composition invented in the 13th century, consisting of 14 decasyllabic or hendecasyllabic iambic lines, rhymed according to two well-established schemes which bear the names of their two most famous exponents, Shakespeare and Petrarch. The Shakespearian sonnet consists of three four-lined stanzas of alternate rhymes clinched by a concluding couplet; the Petrarchan of two parts, an octave, the first eight lines rhymed abbaabba, and a sestet, the concluding six lines arranged variously on a three-rhyme scheme.

Editors Contribution

  1. sonnet

    n. a poem of fourteen lines using any of a number of formal rhyme schemes, in English typically having ten syllables per line.

    Turn back the heart you've turned away. The broken hearts of yesterday. It is in fear you turn away.

    Submitted by TheDefinitionSolver2000 on September 14, 2018  

Matched Categories

Anagrams for sonnet »

  1. tenons

  2. nonets

  3. tonnes

How to pronounce sonnet?

How to say sonnet in sign language?

Numerology

  1. Chaldean Numerology

    The numerical value of sonnet in Chaldean Numerology is: 2

  2. Pythagorean Numerology

    The numerical value of sonnet in Pythagorean Numerology is: 6

Examples of sonnet in a Sentence

  1. Robert A. Heinlein:

    A human being should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion, butcher a hog, cone a ship, design a building, write a sonnet, balance accounts, build a wall, set a bone, comfort the dying, take orders, give orders, cooperate, act alone, solve equations, analyze a new problem, pitch manure, program a computer, cook a tasty meal, fight efficiently, die gallantly.

  2. Robert Heinlein:

    A human being should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion, butcher a hog, conn a ship, design a building, write a sonnet, balance accounts, build a wall, set a bone, comfort the dying, take orders, give orders, cooperate, act alone, solve equations, analyze a new problem, pitch manure, program a computer, cook a tasty meal, fight efficiently, die gallantly. Specialization is for insects.

  3. Deodatta V. Shenai-Khatkhate:

    I often think of Shelley's famous insightful sonnet "Ozymandias" that brilliantly depicts the inevitable fall of all foolishly arrogant leaders and their huge empires built in pretensions to their self-proclaimed greatness. Nature and Time always prevail and overtake ultimately, when nothing remains of those great empires or the arrogant leaders.....and only the lone and level sands stretch far away. Vanity, false pride and arrogance never win, in my view. Humility is the true key success. Here is that famous sonnet "Ozymandias" by Percy Shelley, written in January 1818, nearly 200 years ago. "I met a traveller from an antique land Who said: "Two vast and trunkless legs of stone Stand in the desert. Near them, on the sand, Half sunk, a shattered visage lies, whose frown, And wrinkled lip, and sneer of cold command, Tell that its sculptor well those passions read Which yet survive, stamped on these lifeless things, The hand that mocked them and the heart that fed: And on the pedestal these words appear: 'My name is Ozymandias, king of kings: Look on my works, ye Mighty, and despair!' Nothing beside remains. Round the decay Of that colossal wreck, boundless and bare The lone and level sands stretch far away.

  4. Tallulah Bankhead:

    I have three phobias which, could I mute them, would make my life as slick as a sonnet, but as dull as ditch water: I hate to go to bed, I hate to get up, and I hate to be alone.

Images & Illustrations of sonnet

  1. sonnetsonnetsonnetsonnetsonnet

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Translations for sonnet

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    the highest point (of something)
    • A. cycling
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