What does sonnet mean?

Definitions for sonnet
ˈsɒn ɪtson·net

This dictionary definitions page includes all the possible meanings, example usage and translations of the word sonnet.

Princeton's WordNet

  1. sonnetverb

    a verse form consisting of 14 lines with a fixed rhyme scheme

  2. sonnetverb

    praise in a sonnet

  3. sonnetverb

    compose a sonnet

Wiktionary

  1. sonnetnoun

    A fixed verse form of Italian origin consisting of fourteen lines that are typically five-foot iambics and rhyme according to one of a few prescribed schemes.

Samuel Johnson's Dictionary

  1. SONNETnoun

    Etymology: sonnet, French; sonnetto, Italian.

    A book was writ of late call’d Tetrachordon,
    And woven close, both matter, form, and stile;
    The subject new: it walk’d the town a-while,
    Numb’ring good intellects, now seldom por’d on:
    Cries the stall-reader, Bless us, what a word on
    A title-page is this! and some in file
    Stand spelling false, while one might walk to Mile-End-green. Why is it harder, sirs, than Gordon,
    Colkitto, or Macdonnel, or Galasp?
    Those rugged names to our like mouths grow sleek,
    That would have made Quintilian stare and gasp:
    Thy age like ours, soul of sir John Cheek,
    Hated not learning worse than toad or asp,
    When thou taught’st Cambridge and king Edward Greek. John Milton.

    Let us into the city presently,
    To sort some gentlemen well skill’d in musick;
    I have a sonnet that will serve the turn. William Shakespeare.

Wikipedia

  1. Sonnet

    Sonnet is a song by Britpop band The Verve and is featured on their third album, Urban Hymns. It was released 2 March 1998 as the final single from the album (see 1998 in British music). The song has the same instrumental layout as "The Drugs Don't Work", consisting of acoustic and electric guitars backed up with a string section which is mainly made up of violins. At the start of 1998, Hut wanted to release another single from the album, an idea which the band disagreed with. Unusually, Hut pressed them on this matter, and so the band finally agreed to release "Sonnet", but only in a format that would make it ineligible for chart recognition. Consequently, "Sonnet" was released as part of a set of four 12-inch records (backed by "Stamped", "So Sister" and "Echo Bass"). The release of "Sonnet" was limited to just 5,000 copies, despite the huge radio coverage it received, and the official chart refused to recognize it as a single because of the extra content, as planned. The pack was released in a cardboard mailer, and the preceding three singles from the album, all re-released on the same day, fitted into the mailer. However, sales of an imported format resulted in it charting in the United Kingdom at number 74. In New Zealand, "Sonnet" reached number 43 on the RIANZ Singles Chart in June 1998, while in Australia, it peaked at number 83 on the ARIA Singles Chart in January 1999. It became a major hit in Iceland, debuting at number 15 on the Íslenski Listinn Topp 40 and peaking at number four six weeks later.

ChatGPT

  1. sonnet

    A sonnet is a type of lyrical poetry consisting of 14 lines written in iambic pentameter. It usually expresses single, complete thoughts, ideas, or sentiments. The two primary types of sonnets are the Italian (Petrarchan) sonnet, which has an eight-line octave followed by a six-line sestet, and the English (Shakespearean) sonnet, which is made up of three quatrains and a final rhymed couplet.

Webster Dictionary

  1. Sonnetnoun

    a short poem, -- usually amatory

  2. Sonnetnoun

    a poem of fourteen lines, -- two stanzas, called the octave, being of four verses each, and two stanzas, called the sestet, of three verses each, the rhymes being adjusted by a particular rule

  3. Sonnetverb

    to compose sonnets

  4. Etymology: [F., fr. It. sonetto, fr. suono a sound, a song, fr. L. sonus a sound. See Sound noise.]

Wikidata

  1. Sonnet

    A sonnet is a poetic form which originated in Italy; the Sicilian poet Giacomo da Lentini is credited with its invention. The term sonnet derives from the Italian word sonetto, meaning "little song", and by the thirteenth century it signified a poem of fourteen lines that follows a strict rhyme scheme and specific structure. Conventions associated with the sonnet have evolved over its history. Writers of sonnets are sometimes called "sonneteers," although the term can be used derisively. One of the best-known sonnet writers is William Shakespeare, who wrote 154 of them. A Shakespearean, or English, sonnet consists of fourteen lines written in iambic pentameter, in which a pattern of an unstressed syllable followed by a stressed syllable is repeated five times. The rhyme scheme in a Shakespearean sonnet is a-b-a-b, c-d-c-d, e-f-e-f, g-g; the last two lines are a rhyming couplet. Traditionally, English poets employ iambic pentameter when writing sonnets, but not all English sonnets have the same metrical structure. The first sonnet in Sir Philip Sidney's sequence Astrophel and Stella, for example, has 12 syllables; these lines are iambic hexameters, albeit with an inverted first foot in several lines. In the Romance languages, the hendecasyllable and Alexandrine are the most widely used metres.

Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

  1. Sonnet

    son′et, n. a poem in a stanza mostly iambic in movement, properly decasyllabic or hendecasyllabic in metre, always in fourteen lines—originally composed of an octave and a sestet—properly expressing two successive phases of one thought.—v.t. and v.i. to celebrate in sonnets.—adj. Sonn′etary.—n. Sonneteer′, a composer of sonnets.—v.i. Sonn′etise, to compose sonnets.—v.t. to celebrate in a sonnet.—n. Sonn′etist (Shak.), a sonneteer. [Fr.,—It. sonetto, dim. of sonāre, a sound, song—L. sonus, a sound.]

The Nuttall Encyclopedia

  1. Sonnet

    a form of poetical composition invented in the 13th century, consisting of 14 decasyllabic or hendecasyllabic iambic lines, rhymed according to two well-established schemes which bear the names of their two most famous exponents, Shakespeare and Petrarch. The Shakespearian sonnet consists of three four-lined stanzas of alternate rhymes clinched by a concluding couplet; the Petrarchan of two parts, an octave, the first eight lines rhymed abbaabba, and a sestet, the concluding six lines arranged variously on a three-rhyme scheme.

Editors Contribution

  1. sonnet

    n. a poem of fourteen lines using any of a number of formal rhyme schemes, in English typically having ten syllables per line.

    Turn back the heart you've turned away. The broken hearts of yesterday. It is in fear you turn away.


    Submitted by TheDefinitionSolver2000 on September 14, 2018  

Matched Categories

Anagrams for sonnet »

  1. nonets

  2. tenons

  3. tonnes

  4. stonen

  5. tenson

How to pronounce sonnet?

How to say sonnet in sign language?

Numerology

  1. Chaldean Numerology

    The numerical value of sonnet in Chaldean Numerology is: 2

  2. Pythagorean Numerology

    The numerical value of sonnet in Pythagorean Numerology is: 6

Examples of sonnet in a Sentence

  1. Robert A. Heinlein:

    A human being should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion, butcher a hog, cone a ship, design a building, write a sonnet, balance accounts, build a wall, set a bone, comfort the dying, take orders, give orders, cooperate, act alone, solve equations, analyze a new problem, pitch manure, program a computer, cook a tasty meal, fight efficiently, die gallantly.

  2. Robert Heinlein:

    A human being should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion, butcher a hog, conn a ship, design a building, write a sonnet, balance accounts, build a wall, set a bone, comfort the dying, take orders, give orders, cooperate, act alone, solve equations, analyze a new problem, pitch manure, program a computer, cook a tasty meal, fight efficiently, die gallantly. Specialization is for insects.

  3. Tallulah Bankhead:

    I have three phobias which, could I mute them, would make my life as slick as a sonnet, but as dull as ditch water: I hate to go to bed, I hate to get up, and I hate to be alone.

Popularity rank by frequency of use

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Translations for sonnet

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"sonnet." Definitions.net. STANDS4 LLC, 2024. Web. 25 Jul 2024. <https://www.definitions.net/definition/sonnet>.

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