What does sociology mean?

Definitions for sociology
ˌsoʊ siˈɒl ə dʒi, ˌsoʊ ʃi-so·ci·ol·o·gy

This dictionary definitions page includes all the possible meanings, example usage and translations of the word sociology.

Princeton's WordNet

  1. sociologynoun

    the study and classification of human societies

Wiktionary

  1. sociologynoun

    The study of society, human social interaction and the rules and processes that bind and separate people not only as individuals, but as members of associations, groups and institutions

  2. Etymology: From sociologie a term coined by Auguste Comte in 1834.

Wikipedia

  1. Sociology

    Sociology is a social science that focuses on society, human social behavior, patterns of social relationships, social interaction, and aspects of culture associated with everyday life. It uses various methods of empirical investigation and critical analysis: 3–5  to develop a body of knowledge about social order and social change.: 32–40  While some sociologists conduct research that may be applied directly to social policy and welfare, others focus primarily on refining the theoretical understanding of social processes and phenomenological method. Subject matter can range from micro-level analyses of society (i.e. of individual interaction and agency) to macro-level analyses (i.e. of social systems and social structure).Traditional focuses of sociology include social stratification, social class, social mobility, religion, secularization, law, sexuality, gender, and deviance. As all spheres of human activity are affected by the interplay between social structure and individual agency, sociology has gradually expanded its focus to other subjects and institutions, such as health and the institution of medicine; economy; military; punishment and systems of control; the Internet; sociology of education; social capital; and the role of social activity in the development of scientific knowledge. The range of social scientific methods has also expanded, as social researchers draw upon a variety of qualitative and quantitative techniques. The linguistic and cultural turns of the mid-20th century, especially, have led to increasingly interpretative, hermeneutic, and philosophical approaches towards the analysis of society. Conversely, the turn of the 21st century has seen the rise of new analytically, mathematically, and computationally rigorous techniques, such as agent-based modelling and social network analysis.Social research has influence throughout various industries and sectors of life, such as among politicians, policy makers, and legislators; educators; planners; administrators; developers; business magnates and managers; social workers; non-governmental organizations; and non-profit organizations, as well as individuals interested in resolving social issues in general. As such, there is often a great deal of crossover between social research, market research, and other statistical fields.

ChatGPT

  1. sociology

    Sociology is the scientific study of society, social behavior, social institutions, and patterns of social interaction. It involves understanding the influence of society on individual behaviour, social rules and norms, social structures, and the development and functioning of human society. It makes use of various methods of empirical investigation and critical analysis to develop knowledge about social order, social disorder, and societal changes.

Webster Dictionary

  1. Sociologynoun

    that branch of philosophy which treats of the constitution, phenomena, and development of human society; social science

  2. Etymology: [L. socius a companion + -logy.]

Wikidata

  1. Sociology

    Sociology is the scientific study of human society and its origins, development, organizations, and institutions. It is a social science which uses various methods of empirical investigation and critical analysis to develop a body of knowledge about human social activity, structures, and functions. A goal for many sociologists is to conduct research which may be applied directly to social policy and welfare, while others focus primarily on refining the theoretical understanding of social processes. Subject matter ranges from the micro level of individual agency and interaction to the macro level of systems and the social structure. The traditional focuses of sociology include social stratification, social class, culture, race and ethnicity, gender and sexuality, social mobility, religion, secularization, law, and deviance. As all spheres of human activity are affected by the interplay between social structure and individual agency, sociology has gradually expanded its focus to further subjects, such as health, medical, military and penal institutions, the Internet, environmental sociology, political economy and the role of social activity in the development of scientific knowledge.

Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

  1. Sociology

    sō-shi-ol′ō-ji, n. the science that treats of man as a social being, in the origin, organisation, and development of human society and human culture, esp. on the side of social and political institutions, including ethics, political economy, &c.—ns. Sociog′eny, the science of the origin of society; Sociog′raphy, the branch of sociology devoted to noting and describing the results of observation.—adjs. Sociolog′ic, -al.—adv. Sociolog′ically.—ns. Sociol′ogist, one devoted to the study of sociology; Sō′cius, an associate: a fellow of an academy, &c. [A hybrid from L. socius, a companion, and Gr. logialegein, to speak.]

The Nuttall Encyclopedia

  1. Sociology

    the science which treats of the nature and the developments of society and of social institutions; a science to which Herbert Spencer, in succession to Comte, has contributed more than any other scientist, deducing, as he does, a series of generalisations by comparison of individual organisms with social.

The Roycroft Dictionary

  1. sociology

    The religious application of economics.

U.S. National Library of Medicine

  1. Sociology

    A social science dealing with group relationships, patterns of collective behavior, and social organization.

Matched Categories

British National Corpus

  1. Spoken Corpus Frequency

    Rank popularity for the word 'sociology' in Spoken Corpus Frequency: #4469

  2. Nouns Frequency

    Rank popularity for the word 'sociology' in Nouns Frequency: #1869

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Numerology

  1. Chaldean Numerology

    The numerical value of sociology in Chaldean Numerology is: 8

  2. Pythagorean Numerology

    The numerical value of sociology in Pythagorean Numerology is: 3

Examples of sociology in a Sentence

  1. Riziki Shemdoe:

    Public authorities have the duty to plan and monitor how urban development is evolving, unfortunately this job is getting too hard for them, planners need to have a broad vision of development, taking into account the need of working classes, and the understanding of the sociology of the poor.

  2. Riziki Shemdoe:

    Planners need to have a broad vision of development, taking into account the need of working classes, and the understanding of the sociology of the poor.

  3. Meer Hayet Kabir:

    Sometimes he would say he wants to become an accountant, sometimes he would say theology or sociology.

  4. Wystan Hugh Auden:

    History is, strictly speaking, the study of questions the study of answers belongs to anthropology and sociology.

  5. Eduardo Bonilla-Silva:

    People are doing Sociology 101. They can connect Walter Scott, the assassinations of black folks in a church, the slamming of a girl in a school, and then it's across the nation. People are then connecting the dots and saying, 'No more.'.

Popularity rank by frequency of use

sociology#1#7603#10000

Translations for sociology

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