What does snake mean?

Definitions for snake
sneɪksnake

Here are all the possible meanings and translations of the word snake.

Princeton's WordNet

  1. snake, serpent, ophidiannoun

    limbless scaly elongate reptile; some are venomous

  2. snake, snake in the grassnoun

    a deceitful or treacherous person

  3. Snake, Snake Rivernoun

    a tributary of the Columbia River that rises in Wyoming and flows westward; discovered in 1805 by the Lewis and Clark Expedition

  4. Hydra, Snakenoun

    a long faint constellation in the southern hemisphere near the equator stretching between Virgo and Cancer

  5. snakeverb

    something long, thin, and flexible that resembles a snake

  6. snakeverb

    move smoothly and sinuously, like a snake

  7. snakeverb

    form a snake-like pattern

    "The river snakes through the valley"

  8. snakeverb

    move along a winding path

    "The army snaked through the jungle"

Wiktionary

  1. snakenoun

    A legless reptile of the sub-order Serpentes with a long, thin body and a fork-shaped tongue.

  2. snakenoun

    A treacherous person.

  3. snakenoun

    A tool for unclogging plumbing.

  4. snakenoun

    A tool to aid cable pulling.

  5. snakenoun

    A trouser snake; the penis.

  6. snakeverb

    To move in a winding path.

    The river snakes through the valley.

  7. snakeverb

    To steal slyly.

    He snaked my DVD!

  8. snakeverb

    To clean using a plumbing snake.

  9. Snakenoun

    An early computer game, later popular on mobile phones, in which the player attempts to manoeuvre a perpetually growing snake so as to collect food items and avoid colliding with walls or the snake's tail.

  10. Etymology: snake, from snaca, from snakōn (compare German dialect Schnake 'adder', Swedish snok 'grass snake'), from *snakanan 'to crawl' (compare snahhan), from snag- 'to crawl; a creeping thing' (compare नाग, thnegël).

Samuel Johnson's Dictionary

  1. SNAKEnoun

    A serpent of the oviparous kind, distinguished from a viper. The snake’s bite is harmless. Snake in poetry is a general name for a viper.

    Etymology: snaca , Saxon; snake, Dutch.

    Glo’ster’s shew beguiles him;
    As the snake, roll’d in a flow’ry bank,
    With shining checker’d slough, doth sting a child,
    That for the beauty thinks it excellent. William Shakespeare, Hen. VI.

    We have scotch’d the snake, not kill’d it:
    She’ll close, and be herself; whilst our poor malice
    Remains in danger of her former teeth. William Shakespeare, Macbeth.

    The parts must have their outlines in waves, resembling the gliding of a snake upon the ground: they must be smooth and even. John Dryden, Dufresnoy.

    Nor chalk, nor crumbling stones, the food of snakes
    That work in hollow earth their winding tracks. Dryden.

Wikipedia

  1. Snake

    Snakes are elongated, limbless, carnivorous reptiles of the suborder Serpentes . Like all other squamates, snakes are ectothermic, amniote vertebrates covered in overlapping scales. Many species of snakes have skulls with several more joints than their lizard ancestors, enabling them to swallow prey much larger than their heads (cranial kinesis). To accommodate their narrow bodies, snakes' paired organs (such as kidneys) appear one in front of the other instead of side by side, and most have only one functional lung. Some species retain a pelvic girdle with a pair of vestigial claws on either side of the cloaca. Lizards have evolved elongate bodies without limbs or with greatly reduced limbs about twenty-five times independently via convergent evolution, leading to many lineages of legless lizards. These resemble snakes, but several common groups of legless lizards have eyelids and external ears, which snakes lack, although this rule is not universal (see Amphisbaenia, Dibamidae, and Pygopodidae). Living snakes are found on every continent except Antarctica, and on most smaller land masses; exceptions include some large islands, such as Ireland, Iceland, Greenland, the Hawaiian archipelago, and the islands of New Zealand, as well as many small islands of the Atlantic and central Pacific oceans. Additionally, sea snakes are widespread throughout the Indian and Pacific oceans. Around thirty families are currently recognized, comprising about 520 genera and about 3,900 species. They range in size from the tiny, 10.4 cm-long (4.1 in) Barbados threadsnake to the reticulated python of 6.95 meters (22.8 ft) in length. The fossil species Titanoboa cerrejonensis was 12.8 meters (42 ft) long. Snakes are thought to have evolved from either burrowing or aquatic lizards, perhaps during the Jurassic period, with the earliest known fossils dating to between 143 and 167 Ma ago. The diversity of modern snakes appeared during the Paleocene epoch (c. 66 to 56 Ma ago, after the Cretaceous–Paleogene extinction event). The oldest preserved descriptions of snakes can be found in the Brooklyn Papyrus. Most species of snake are nonvenomous and those that have venom use it primarily to kill and subdue prey rather than for self-defense. Some possess venom that is potent enough to cause painful injury or death to humans. Nonvenomous snakes either swallow prey alive or kill by constriction.

Webster Dictionary

  1. Snakenoun

    any species of the order Ophidia; an ophidian; a serpent, whether harmless or venomous. See Ophidia, and Serpent

  2. Snakeverb

    to drag or draw, as a snake from a hole; -- often with out

  3. Snakeverb

    to wind round spirally, as a large rope with a smaller, or with cord, the small rope lying in the spaces between the strands of the large one; to worm

  4. Snakeverb

    to crawl like a snake

  5. Etymology: [AS. snaca; akin to LG. snake, schnake, Icel. snkr, snkr, Dan. snog, Sw. snok; of uncertain origin.]

Freebase

  1. Snake

    Snakes are elongate, legless, carnivorous reptiles of the suborder Serpentes that can be distinguished from legless lizards by their lack of eyelids and external ears. Like all squamates, snakes are ectothermic, amniote vertebrates covered in overlapping scales. Many species of snakes have skulls with many more joints than their lizard ancestors, enabling them to swallow prey much larger than their heads with their highly mobile jaws. To accommodate their narrow bodies, snakes' paired organs appear one in front of the other instead of side by side, and most have only one functional lung. Some species retain a pelvic girdle with a pair of vestigial claws on either side of the cloaca. Living snakes are found on every continent except Antarctica, in the Pacific and Indian Oceans, and on most smaller land masses — exceptions include some large islands, such as Ireland and New Zealand, and many small islands of the Atlantic and central Pacific. More than 20 families are currently recognized, comprising about 500 genera and about 3,400 species. They range in size from the tiny, 10 cm-long thread snake to the Reticulated python of up to 8.7 meters in length. The fossil species Titanoboa cerrejonensis was 15 meters long. Snakes are thought to have evolved from either burrowing or aquatic lizards during the mid-Cretaceous period, and the earliest known fossils date to around 112 Ma ago. The diversity of modern snakes appeared during the Paleocene period. The oldest preserved descriptions of snakes can be found in the Brooklyn Papyrus.

Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

  1. Snake

    snāk, n. a serpent—Snakes (Ophidia) form one of the classes of reptiles, in shape limbless and much elongated, embracing tree-snakes, the water-snakes, and the very venomous sea-snakes (Hydrophidæ), the burrowing-snakes (Typhlopidæ) and the majority, which may be called ground-snakes.—ns. Snake′-bird, a darter: the wryneck; Snake′-eel, a long Mediterranean eel, its tail without a tail-fin.—adj. Snake′-like (Tenn.), like a snake.—ns. Snake′-root, the popular name of various plants of different genera, whose roots are considered good for snake-bites; Snake's′-head, the guinea-hen flower; Snake′-stone, a small rounded piece of stone or other hard substance, popularly believed to be efficacious in curing snake-bites; Snake′-weed, the bistort; Snake′wood (same as Letter-wood).—adjs. Snak′ish, having the qualities of a snake: cunning, deceitful; Snak′y (Spens.), belonging to, or resembling, a serpent: (Milt.) cunning, deceitful: covered with, or having, serpents. [A.S. snaca, prob. from snícan, to creep; Ice. snák-r.]

Suggested Resources

  1. snake

    The snake symbol -- In this Symbols.com article you will learn about the meaning of the snake symbol and its characteristic.

British National Corpus

  1. Nouns Frequency

    Rank popularity for the word 'snake' in Nouns Frequency: #2693

Anagrams for snake »

  1. sneak

  2. akens

  3. skean

How to pronounce snake?

How to say snake in sign language?

Numerology

  1. Chaldean Numerology

    The numerical value of snake in Chaldean Numerology is: 7

  2. Pythagorean Numerology

    The numerical value of snake in Pythagorean Numerology is: 5

Examples of snake in a Sentence

  1. President Donald Trump:

    I told Mike not to be complimentary of New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo because New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo is a snake, just let me tell you, we have a lot of problems with the governor and the governor of Washington, that's where you have many of your problems, OK ? So Mike may be happy with him but I'm not, OK ?

  2. Greg Pauly:

    I never would have thought that a sea snake would wash up that far up north.

  3. Richard Gere:

    I know who I am. No one else knows who I am. If I was a giraffe, and someone said I was a snake, I'd think, no, actually I'm a giraffe.

  4. Babu Ram:

    A snake bit him. So, in turn, he bit it and chewed it into pieces.

  5. Taylor Swift:

    A couple of years ago, someone called me a snake on social media and it caught on. And then a lot of people called me a lot of names on social media. And I went through some really low times for a while because of it, i went through sometimes when I didn’t know if I was gonna get to do this anymore.

Popularity rank by frequency of use

snake#1#7560#10000

Translations for snake

From our Multilingual Translation Dictionary

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"snake." Definitions.net. STANDS4 LLC, 2023. Web. 8 Feb. 2023. <https://www.definitions.net/definition/snake>.

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