What does snail mean?

Definitions for snail
sneɪlsnail

This dictionary definitions page includes all the possible meanings, example usage and translations of the word snail.

Princeton's WordNet

  1. snailnoun

    freshwater or marine or terrestrial gastropod mollusk usually having an external enclosing spiral shell

  2. escargot, snailverb

    edible terrestrial snail usually served in the shell with a sauce of melted butter and garlic

  3. snailverb

    gather snails

    "We went snailing in the summer"

Wiktionary

  1. snailnoun

    Any of very many animals (either hermaphroditic or nonhermaphroditic), of the class Gastropoda, having a coiled shell.

  2. snailnoun

    A slow person; a sluggard.

  3. Etymology: From the Middle English snegge, from the Old English snägel from the snigla-z.

Samuel Johnson's Dictionary

  1. Snailnoun

    Etymology: snœgl , Saxon; snegel, Dutch.

    I can tell why a snail has a house. —— Why? —— Why, to put’s head in; not to give it away to his daughters, and leave his horns without a case. William Shakespeare, King Lear.

    Fearful commenting
    Is leaden servitor to dull delay;
    Delay leads impotent and snail pac’d beggary. William Shakespeare, R. III.

    The patch is kind enough, but a huge feeder:
    Snail slow in profit, but he sleeps by day
    More than the wild cat. William Shakespeare.

    Seeing the snail, which every where doth roam,
    Carrying his own house still, still is at home,
    Follow, for he is easy-pac’d, this snail
    Be thine own palace, or the world’s thy gaol. John Donne.

    A river snail-shell decayed, shewed spar within. John Woodward.

    There may be as many ranks of beings in the invisible world superior to us, as we ourselves are superior to all the ranks of being beneath us in this visible world, even though we descend below the snail and the oyster. Isaac Watts.

    Why prat’st thou to thyself, and answer’st not?
    Dromio, thou drone, thou snail, thou slug, thou sot! William Shakespeare.

Wikipedia

  1. Snail

    A snail is, in loose terms, a shelled gastropod. The name is most often applied to land snails, terrestrial pulmonate gastropod molluscs. However, the common name snail is also used for most of the members of the molluscan class Gastropoda that have a coiled shell that is large enough for the animal to retract completely into. When the word "snail" is used in this most general sense, it includes not just land snails but also numerous species of sea snails and freshwater snails. Gastropods that naturally lack a shell, or have only an internal shell, are mostly called slugs, and land snails that have only a very small shell (that they cannot retract into) are often called semi-slugs. Snails have considerable human relevance, including as food items, as pests, as vectors of disease, and their shells are used as decorative objects and are incorporated into jewelry. The snail has also had some cultural significance, and has been used as a metaphor.

ChatGPT

  1. snail

    A snail is a small invertebrate animal with a coiled shell, belonging to the mollusk family. They are characterized by their slow movement and distinctive spiral shell into which they can retract for protection. Snails can live in a variety of habitats including land, sea, and freshwater environments. They have a head with eyes and tentacles and use a muscular 'foot' to move around. Snails are also known as gastropods, and their diet ranges from plant matter to other small animals, depending on the species.

Webster Dictionary

  1. Snailnoun

    any one of numerous species of terrestrial air-breathing gastropods belonging to the genus Helix and many allied genera of the family Helicidae. They are abundant in nearly all parts of the world except the arctic regions, and feed almost entirely on vegetation; a land snail

  2. Snailnoun

    any gastropod having a general resemblance to the true snails, including fresh-water and marine species. See Pond snail, under Pond, and Sea snail

  3. Snailnoun

    hence, a drone; a slow-moving person or thing

  4. Snailnoun

    a spiral cam, or a flat piece of metal of spirally curved outline, used for giving motion to, or changing the position of, another part, as the hammer tail of a striking clock

  5. Snailnoun

    a tortoise; in ancient warfare, a movable roof or shed to protect besiegers; a testudo

  6. Snailnoun

    the pod of the sanil clover

  7. Etymology: [OE. snaile, AS. sngel, snegel, sngl; akin to G. schnecke, OHG. snecko, Dan. snegl, Icel. snigill.]

Wikidata

  1. Snail

    Snail is a common name that is applied most often to land snails, terrestrial pulmonate gastropod molluscs. However, the common name "snail" is also applied to most of the members of the molluscan class Gastropoda that have a coiled shell that is large enough for the animal to retract completely into. When the word "snail" is used in this most general sense, it includes not just land snails but also thousands of species of sea snails and freshwater snails. Occasionally a few other molluscs that are not actually gastropods, such as the Monoplacophora, which superficially resemble small limpets, may also informally be referred to as "snails". Snail-like animals that naturally lack a shell, or have only an internal shell, are usually called slugs, and land snails that have only a very small shell are often called semislugs.

Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

  1. Snail

    snāl, n. a term for the species of terrestrial Gasteropoda which have well-formed spiral shells—the more typical snails belonging to the genus Helix, of the family Helicidæ, having the shell of many whorls, globose, depressed, or conical.—ns. Snail′-clov′er, -trē′foil, a species of medic; Snail′-fish, a fish of genus Liparis, sticking to rocks; Snail′-flow′er, a twining bean.—adjs. Snail′-like (Shak.), in the manner of a snail, slowly; Snail′-paced (Shak.), as slow-moving as a snail; Snail′-slow, as slow as a snail.—n. Snail′-wheel, in some striking time-pieces, a rotating piece with a spiral periphery having notches so arranged as to determine the number of strokes made on the bell.—Snail's pace, a very slow pace. [A.S. snegl, snægl; Ger. schnecke.]

The New Hacker's Dictionary

  1. snail

    To snail-mail something. “Snail me a copy of those graphics, will you?”

Matched Categories

Anagrams for snail »

  1. nails

  2. slain

  3. anils

  4. sinal

How to pronounce snail?

How to say snail in sign language?

Numerology

  1. Chaldean Numerology

    The numerical value of snail in Chaldean Numerology is: 4

  2. Pythagorean Numerology

    The numerical value of snail in Pythagorean Numerology is: 1

Examples of snail in a Sentence

  1. European Competition Commissioner Margrethe Vestager:

    Some tool boxes are if not empty then at least somewhat outdated because we find that there are agencies which are not allowed to collect digital evidence. They cannot search the cloud for evidence of collusion or abuse of dominant position, there is no reason to believe that cartelists should use only snail mail or paper memos, at least I find that hypothesis very hard to sustain. So what we see is that there is a need for alignment when it comes to having a full, modern tool box.

  2. Jeff Tjornehoj:

    With Fed rate hikes moving at a snail’s pace, a primary motivator for investors seeking inflation protection - the rate reset feature of loans – is greatly diminished.

  3. Heather Stockdale Walden:

    In Florida, we are finding it in both native and non-native snail species, and some of these snails have geographic ranges that extend well beyond Florida.

  4. David Sischo:

    For a snail he was a little bit of a hermit, i very rarely saw him outside of his shell.

  5. Butler:

    There needs no other charm, nor conjuror, To raise infernal spirits up, but Fear, That makes men pull their horns in, like a snail, That?s both a prisoner to itself and jail; Draws more fantastic shapes than in the grains Of knotted wood, in some men?s crazy brains, When all the cocks they think they are, and bulls, Are only in the insides of their skulls.

Popularity rank by frequency of use

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Translations for snail

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"snail." Definitions.net. STANDS4 LLC, 2024. Web. 19 May 2024. <https://www.definitions.net/definition/snail>.

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