What does smoking mean?

Definitions for smoking
smok·ing

Here are all the possible meanings and translations of the word smoking.

Princeton's WordNet

  1. smoke, smokingnoun

    the act of smoking tobacco or other substances

    "he went outside for a smoke"; "smoking stinks"

  2. smoke, smokingadjective

    a hot vapor containing fine particles of carbon being produced by combustion

    "the fire produced a tower of black smoke that could be seen for miles"

  3. smokingadjective

    emitting smoke in great volume

    "a smoking fireplace"

Wiktionary

  1. smokingnoun

    The inhalation of tobacco, or use substances.

    Smoking is permitted.

  2. smokingadjective

    Giving off smoke.

  3. smokingadjective

    Sexually attractive, usually referring to a woman.

    That woman is smoking-hot

Wikipedia

  1. Smoking

    Smoking is a practice in which a substance is burned and the resulting smoke is typically breathed in to be tasted and absorbed into the bloodstream. Most commonly, the substance used is the dried leaves of the tobacco plant, which have been rolled into a small rectangle of rolling paper to create a small, round cylinder called a cigarette. Smoking is primarily practised as a route of administration for recreational drug use because the combustion of the dried plant leaves vaporizes and delivers active substances into the lungs where they are rapidly absorbed into the bloodstream and reach bodily tissue. In the case of cigarette smoking, these substances are contained in a mixture of aerosol particles and gases and include the pharmacologically active alkaloid nicotine; the vaporization creates heated aerosol and gas into a form that allows inhalation and deep penetration into the lungs where absorption into the bloodstream of the active substances occurs. In some cultures, smoking is also carried out as a part of various rituals, where participants use it to help induce trance-like states that, they believe, can lead them to spiritual enlightenment. Smoking is one of the most common forms of recreational drug use. Tobacco smoking is the most popular form, being practised by over one billion people globally, of whom the majority are in the developing countries. Less common drugs for smoking include cannabis and opium. Some of the substances are classified as hard narcotics, like heroin, but the use of these is very limited as they are usually not commercially available. Cigarettes are primarily industrially manufactured but also can be hand-rolled from loose tobacco and rolling paper. Other smoking implements include pipes, cigars, bidis, hookahs, and bongs. Smoking has negative health effects, because smoke inhalation inherently poses challenges to various physiologic processes such as respiration. Smoking tobacco is among the leading causes of many diseases such as lung cancer, heart attack, COPD, erectile dysfunction, and birth defects. Diseases related to tobacco smoking have been shown to kill approximately half of long-term smokers when compared to average mortality rates faced by non-smokers. Smoking caused over five million deaths a year from 1990 to 2015. Non-smokers account for 600,000 deaths globally due to second-hand smoke. The health hazards of smoking have caused many countries to institute high taxes on tobacco products, publish advertisements to discourage use, limit advertisements that promote use, and provide help with quitting for those who do smoke.Smoking can be dated to as early as 5000 BCE, and has been recorded in many different cultures across the world. Early smoking evolved in association with religious ceremonies; as offerings to deities; in cleansing rituals; or to allow shamans and priests to alter their minds for purposes of divination or spiritual enlightenment. After the European exploration and conquest of the Americas, the practice of smoking tobacco quickly spread to the rest of the world. In regions like India and Sub-Saharan Africa, it merged with existing practices of smoking (mostly of cannabis). In Europe, it introduced a new type of social activity and a form of drug intake which previously had been unknown. Perception surrounding smoking has varied over time and from one place to another: holy and sinful, sophisticated and vulgar, a panacea and deadly health hazard. In the last decade of the 20th century, smoking came to be viewed in a decidedly negative light, especially in Western countries.

Webster Dictionary

  1. Smoking

    of Smoke

  2. Smoking

    a. & n. from Smoke

Freebase

  1. Smoking

    Smoking is the process of flavoring, cooking, or preserving food by exposing it to the smoke from burning or smoldering plant materials, most often wood. Meats and fish are the most common smoked foods, though cheeses, vegetables, and ingredients used to make beverages such as beer, smoked beer, and lapsang souchong tea are also smoked. In Europe, alder is the traditional smoking wood, but oak is more often used now, and beech to a lesser extent. In North America, hickory, mesquite, oak, pecan, alder, maple, and fruit-tree woods, such as apple, cherry, and plum, are commonly used for smoking. Other fuels besides wood can also be employed, sometimes with the addition of flavoring ingredients. Chinese tea-smoking uses a mixture of uncooked rice, sugar, and tea, heated at the base of a wok. Some North American ham and bacon makers smoke their products over burning corncobs. Peat is burned to dry and smoke the barley malt used to make whisky and some beers. In New Zealand, sawdust from the native manuka is commonly used for hot smoking fish. In Iceland, dried sheep dung is used to cold-smoke fish, lamb, mutton, and whale. Historically, farms in the Western world included a small building termed the smokehouse, where meats could be smoked and stored. This was generally well-separated from other buildings both because of the fire danger and because of the smoke emanations.

U.S. National Library of Medicine

  1. Smoking

    Inhaling and exhaling the smoke of tobacco or something similar to tobacco.

Suggested Resources

  1. smoking

    The smoking symbol -- In this Symbols.com article you will learn about the meaning of the smoking symbol and its characteristic.

Matched Categories

British National Corpus

  1. Written Corpus Frequency

    Rank popularity for the word 'smoking' in Written Corpus Frequency: #3611

  2. Nouns Frequency

    Rank popularity for the word 'smoking' in Nouns Frequency: #2691

How to pronounce smoking?

How to say smoking in sign language?

Numerology

  1. Chaldean Numerology

    The numerical value of smoking in Chaldean Numerology is: 7

  2. Pythagorean Numerology

    The numerical value of smoking in Pythagorean Numerology is: 7

Examples of smoking in a Sentence

  1. Danaya Wright:

    I don't know that we need a smoking gun, in particular, to say that this is coming from state government, governmental entities.

  2. Robin Koval:

    One of the things we see is a belief among young people that if you only smoke occasionally, light smoking or intermittent smoking, that somehow that's not as dangerous.

  3. Rinesha Moore:

    I saw that my food was kinda….it’s usually smoking but it wasn’t smoking this time, it was kinda dry so I said can I get some fresh fries.

  4. Otis Brawley:

    Head and neck cancer caused by HPV is an easier cancer to treat compared to a head and neck cancer that’s caused by alcohol and smoking.

  5. Otis Brawley:

    The biggest reason for the decline that started in 1991 was the prevalence of smoking in the United States started going down in 1965, that’s the reason why we started having a decline in 1991, and that decline has continued because the prevalence of people smoking in the United States has continued to go down.

Popularity rank by frequency of use

smoking#1#2856#10000

Translations for smoking

From our Multilingual Translation Dictionary

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"smoking." Definitions.net. STANDS4 LLC, 2023. Web. 8 Feb. 2023. <https://www.definitions.net/definition/smoking>.

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