What does sling mean?

Definitions for sling
slɪŋsling

Here are all the possible meanings and translations of the word sling.

Princeton's WordNet

  1. sling(noun)

    a highball with liquor and water with sugar and lemon or lime juice

  2. slingshot, sling, catapult(noun)

    a plaything consisting of a Y-shaped stick with elastic between the arms; used to propel small stones

  3. slingback, sling(noun)

    a shoe that has a strap that wraps around the heel

  4. sling(noun)

    a simple weapon consisting of a looped strap in which a projectile is whirled and then released

  5. sling, scarf bandage, triangular bandage(verb)

    bandage to support an injured forearm; consisting of a wide triangular piece of cloth hanging from around the neck

  6. sling, catapult(verb)

    hurl as if with a sling

  7. sling(verb)

    hang loosely or freely; let swing

  8. sling(verb)

    move with a sling

    "sling the cargo onto the ship"

  9. sling(verb)

    hold or carry in a sling

    "he cannot button his shirt with his slinged arm"

Wiktionary

  1. sling(Noun)

    An instrument for throwing stones or other missiles, consisting of a short strap with two strings fastened to its ends, or with a string fastened to one end and a light stick to the other.

  2. sling(Noun)

    A kind of hanging bandage put around the neck, in which a wounded arm or hand is supported.

  3. sling(Noun)

    A loop of cloth, worn around the neck, for supporting a baby.

  4. sling(Noun)

    A loop of rope, or a rope or chain with hooks, for suspending a barrel, bale, or other heavy object, in hoisting or lowering.

  5. sling(Noun)

    A strap attached to a firearm, for suspending it from the shoulder.

  6. sling(Noun)

    (Nautical) A band of rope or iron for securing a yard to a mast; -- chiefly in the plural.

  7. sling(Noun)

    The act or motion of hurling as with a sling; a throw; figuratively, a stroke.

  8. sling(Noun)

    A loop of rope or fabric tape used for various purposes: e.g. as part of a runner, or providing extra protection when abseiling or belaying.

  9. sling(Noun)

    A drink composed of a spirit (usually gin) and water sweetened.

  10. sling(Verb)

    To throw with a circular or arcing motion.

  11. Origin: Probably from slyngja, slyngva, from slingwanan (compare Old English slingan, German schlingen, Danish slynge), from slenk (compare Welsh llyngyr, Lithuanian sliñkti, Latvian slìkt).

Webster Dictionary

  1. Sling(verb)

    an instrument for throwing stones or other missiles, consisting of a short strap with two strings fastened to its ends, or with a string fastened to one end and a light stick to the other. The missile being lodged in a hole in the strap, the ends of the string are taken in the hand, and the whole whirled rapidly round until, by loosing one end, the missile is let fly with centrifugal force

  2. Sling(verb)

    the act or motion of hurling as with a sling; a throw; figuratively, a stroke

  3. Sling(verb)

    a contrivance for sustaining anything by suspension

  4. Sling(verb)

    a kind of hanging bandage put around the neck, in which a wounded arm or hand is supported

  5. Sling(verb)

    a loop of rope, or a rope or chain with hooks, for suspending a barrel, bale, or other heavy object, in hoisting or lowering

  6. Sling(verb)

    a strap attached to a firearm, for suspending it from the shoulder

  7. Sling(verb)

    a band of rope or iron for securing a yard to a mast; -- chiefly in the plural

  8. Sling(verb)

    to throw with a sling

  9. Sling(verb)

    to throw; to hurl; to cast

  10. Sling(verb)

    to hang so as to swing; as, to sling a pack

  11. Sling(verb)

    to pass a rope round, as a cask, gun, etc., preparatory to attaching a hoisting or lowering tackle

  12. Sling(noun)

    a drink composed of spirit (usually gin) and water sweetened

  13. Origin: [OE. slinge; akin to OD. slinge, D. slinger, OHG. slinga; cf. OF. eslingue, of German origin. See Sling, v. t.]

Freebase

  1. Sling

    A sling is a projectile weapon typically used to throw a blunt projectile such as a stone, clay or lead "sling-bullet". It is also known as the shepherd's sling. A sling has a small cradle or pouch in the middle of two lengths of cord. The sling stone is placed in the pouch. The middle finger is placed through the loop, the other string has a tab that is placed between the thumb and forefinger. The sling is swung and with a flick of the wrist the tab is released at the precise moment. This frees the projectile to fly to the target. The sling derives its effectiveness by essentially extending the length of a human arm, thus allowing stones to be thrown farther than they could be by hand. The sling is inexpensive and easy to build. It has historically been used for hunting game and in combat. Film exists of Spanish Civil War combatants using slings to throw grenades over buildings into enemy positions on the opposite street. Today the sling interests sportsmen as a wilderness survival tool and as an improvised weapon.

Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

  1. Sling

    sling, n. a strap or pocket with a string attached to each end, for hurling a stone: a throw: a hanging bandage for a wounded limb: a rope with hooks, used in hoisting and lowering weights: a sweep or swing: a stroke as from a missile thrown from a sling.—v.t. to throw with a sling: to hang so as to swing: to move or swing by means of a rope: to cast.—v.i. to bound along with swinging steps: (slang) to blow the nose with the fingers:—pa.t. and pa.p. slung.—ns. Sling′er; Sling′stone, a stone to be thrown from a sling. [A.S. slingan, to turn in a circle; Ger. schlingen, to move or twine round.]

  2. Sling

    sling, n. toddy with grated nutmeg.

Military Dictionary and Gazetteer

  1. sling

    A weapon much in use before the introduction of fire-arms, consisted of a piece of leather, with a round hole in the middle, and two cords of about a yard in length. A round pebble being hung in the leather by cords, the latter were held firmly in the right hand, and swung rapidly round. When the stone had attained great speed, one string was disengaged, on which the stone flew off at a tangent, its initial velocity being the same as it had at the last moment of revolution. This velocity gives far greater range and force than could be imparted in mere throwing. The men who used this weapon were called slingers.

  2. sling

    A leather strap attached to a musket, serving to support it across the soldier’s back, as occasion may require.

Etymology and Origins

  1. Sling

    An American mixed drink, so called on account of the different ingredients slung into it.

Anagrams for sling »

  1. ILGNs

  2. lings

How to pronounce sling?

  1. Alex
    Alex
    US English
    Daniel
    Daniel
    British
    Karen
    Karen
    Australian
    Veena
    Veena
    Indian

How to say sling in sign language?

  1. sling

Numerology

  1. Chaldean Numerology

    The numerical value of sling in Chaldean Numerology is: 6

  2. Pythagorean Numerology

    The numerical value of sling in Pythagorean Numerology is: 7

Examples of sling in a Sentence

  1. Adlai E. Stevenson Jr.:

    When you sling mud, you lose ground.

  2. Jamie Webb:

    I once dared a customer on a hen night to sling a bra to the horn to win a free shot, she did and it has become a tradition ever since.

  3. John McAfee:

    I take responsibility for all my faults, if you want to sling mud, I promise you that no one can sling mud at me that I had not already slung at myself publicly.

  4. Joe Meaux:

    My guns are all very recognizable, we do a lot of custom work, there was one Ak-47 copy built from a .22 I identified. Everything from the optic to the way the sling was placed was all very identifiable.

  5. Sam Galsworthy:

    I've always felt an emotional connection with Stamford Raffles because Stamford Raffles was my great, great, great, great, great grandfather, when I mentioned this to Nigel Moore [ Raffles' FB director ], I saw his face light up as I hoped it would. But I was blissfully unaware that 2015 would be the centenary of the Raffles Singapore Sling.

Images & Illustrations of sling

  1. slingslingslingslingsling

Popularity rank by frequency of use

sling#10000#19417#100000

Translations for sling

From our Multilingual Translation Dictionary

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"sling." Definitions.net. STANDS4 LLC, 2020. Web. 27 Jan. 2020. <https://www.definitions.net/definition/sling>.

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