What does slice mean?

Definitions for slice
slaɪsslice

Here are all the possible meanings and translations of the word slice.

Princeton's WordNet

  1. slice, piece(noun)

    a share of something

    "a slice of the company's revenue"

  2. piece, slice(noun)

    a serving that has been cut from a larger portion

    "a piece of pie"; "a slice of bread"

  3. cut, gash, slash, slice(noun)

    a wound made by cutting

    "he put a bandage over the cut"

  4. slice, fade, slicing(noun)

    a golf shot that curves to the right for a right-handed golfer

    "he took lessons to cure his slicing"

  5. slice(noun)

    a thin flat piece cut off of some object

  6. slice(verb)

    a spatula for spreading paint or ink

  7. slit, slice(verb)

    make a clean cut through

    "slit her throat"

  8. slice(verb)

    hit a ball and put a spin on it so that it travels in a different direction

  9. slice, slice up(verb)

    cut into slices

    "Slice the salami, please"

  10. slice(verb)

    hit a ball so that it causes a backspin

Wiktionary

  1. slice(Noun)

    That which is thin and broad.

    Etymology: From slice, esclice, from esclice, esclis, deverbal of esclicer, esclicier, of origin, from Old *, from slitjanan, from slītanan, from slaid-. Akin to sliz, gisliz, slizan, slitan. More at slite, slit.

  2. slice(Noun)

    A thin, broad piece cut off.

    a slice of bacon; a slice of cheese; a slice of bread

    Etymology: From slice, esclice, from esclice, esclis, deverbal of esclicer, esclicier, of origin, from Old *, from slitjanan, from slītanan, from slaid-. Akin to sliz, gisliz, slizan, slitan. More at slite, slit.

  3. slice(Noun)

    amount

    Etymology: From slice, esclice, from esclice, esclis, deverbal of esclicer, esclicier, of origin, from Old *, from slitjanan, from slītanan, from slaid-. Akin to sliz, gisliz, slizan, slitan. More at slite, slit.

  4. slice(Noun)

    A piece of pizza.

    Etymology: From slice, esclice, from esclice, esclis, deverbal of esclicer, esclicier, of origin, from Old *, from slitjanan, from slītanan, from slaid-. Akin to sliz, gisliz, slizan, slitan. More at slite, slit.

  5. slice(Noun)

    A snack consisting of pastry with savoury filling.

    I bought a ham and cheese slice at the service station.

    Etymology: From slice, esclice, from esclice, esclis, deverbal of esclicer, esclicier, of origin, from Old *, from slitjanan, from slītanan, from slaid-. Akin to sliz, gisliz, slizan, slitan. More at slite, slit.

  6. slice(Noun)

    A broad, thin piece of plaster.

    Etymology: From slice, esclice, from esclice, esclis, deverbal of esclicer, esclicier, of origin, from Old *, from slitjanan, from slītanan, from slaid-. Akin to sliz, gisliz, slizan, slitan. More at slite, slit.

  7. slice(Noun)

    A knife with a thin, broad blade for taking up or serving fish; also, a spatula for spreading anything, as paint or ink.

    Etymology: From slice, esclice, from esclice, esclis, deverbal of esclicer, esclicier, of origin, from Old *, from slitjanan, from slītanan, from slaid-. Akin to sliz, gisliz, slizan, slitan. More at slite, slit.

  8. slice(Noun)

    A salver, platter, or tray.

    Etymology: From slice, esclice, from esclice, esclis, deverbal of esclicer, esclicier, of origin, from Old *, from slitjanan, from slītanan, from slaid-. Akin to sliz, gisliz, slizan, slitan. More at slite, slit.

  9. slice(Noun)

    A plate of iron with a handle, forming a kind of chisel, or a spadelike implement, variously proportioned, and used for various purposes, as for stripping the planking from a vessel's side, for cutting blubber from a whale, or for stirring a fire of coals; a slice bar; a peel; a fire shovel.

    Etymology: From slice, esclice, from esclice, esclis, deverbal of esclicer, esclicier, of origin, from Old *, from slitjanan, from slītanan, from slaid-. Akin to sliz, gisliz, slizan, slitan. More at slite, slit.

  10. slice(Verb)

    To cut into slices.

    Slice the cheese thinly.

    Etymology: From slice, esclice, from esclice, esclis, deverbal of esclicer, esclicier, of origin, from Old *, from slitjanan, from slītanan, from slaid-. Akin to sliz, gisliz, slizan, slitan. More at slite, slit.

  11. slice(Verb)

    To hit a shot that slices (travels from left to right for a right-handed player).

    Etymology: From slice, esclice, from esclice, esclis, deverbal of esclicer, esclicier, of origin, from Old *, from slitjanan, from slītanan, from slaid-. Akin to sliz, gisliz, slizan, slitan. More at slite, slit.

  12. slice(Noun)

    One of the wedges by which the cradle and the ship are lifted clear of the building blocks to prepare for launching.

    Etymology: From slice, esclice, from esclice, esclis, deverbal of esclicer, esclicier, of origin, from Old *, from slitjanan, from slītanan, from slaid-. Akin to sliz, gisliz, slizan, slitan. More at slite, slit.

  13. slice(Noun)

    A removable sliding bottom to galley.

    Etymology: From slice, esclice, from esclice, esclis, deverbal of esclicer, esclicier, of origin, from Old *, from slitjanan, from slītanan, from slaid-. Akin to sliz, gisliz, slizan, slitan. More at slite, slit.

  14. slice(Noun)

    A shot that (for the right-handed player) curves unintentionally to the right. See fade, hook, draw

    Etymology: From slice, esclice, from esclice, esclis, deverbal of esclicer, esclicier, of origin, from Old *, from slitjanan, from slītanan, from slaid-. Akin to sliz, gisliz, slizan, slitan. More at slite, slit.

  15. slice(Noun)

    A class of heavy cakes or desserts made in a tray and cut out into squarish slices.

    Etymology: From slice, esclice, from esclice, esclis, deverbal of esclicer, esclicier, of origin, from Old *, from slitjanan, from slītanan, from slaid-. Akin to sliz, gisliz, slizan, slitan. More at slite, slit.

  16. slice(Noun)

    A section of image taken of an internal organ using MRI (magnetic resonance imaging), CT (computed tomography), or various forms of x-ray.

    Etymology: From slice, esclice, from esclice, esclis, deverbal of esclicer, esclicier, of origin, from Old *, from slitjanan, from slītanan, from slaid-. Akin to sliz, gisliz, slizan, slitan. More at slite, slit.

  17. slice(Noun)

    A hawk's or falcon's dropping which squirts at an angle other than vertical. (See mute.)

    Etymology: From slice, esclice, from esclice, esclis, deverbal of esclicer, esclicier, of origin, from Old *, from slitjanan, from slītanan, from slaid-. Akin to sliz, gisliz, slizan, slitan. More at slite, slit.

  18. slice(Noun)

    A piece of vegan imitation cheese.

    Etymology: From slice, esclice, from esclice, esclis, deverbal of esclicer, esclicier, of origin, from Old *, from slitjanan, from slītanan, from slaid-. Akin to sliz, gisliz, slizan, slitan. More at slite, slit.

Webster Dictionary

  1. Slice(verb)

    a thin, broad piece cut off; as, a slice of bacon; a slice of cheese; a slice of bread

    Etymology: [OE. slice, sclice, OF. esclice, from esclicier, esclichier, to break to pieces, of German origin; cf. OHG. slzan to split, slit, tear, G. schleissen to slit. See Slit, v. t.]

  2. Slice(verb)

    that which is thin and broad, like a slice

    Etymology: [OE. slice, sclice, OF. esclice, from esclicier, esclichier, to break to pieces, of German origin; cf. OHG. slzan to split, slit, tear, G. schleissen to slit. See Slit, v. t.]

  3. Slice(verb)

    a broad, thin piece of plaster

    Etymology: [OE. slice, sclice, OF. esclice, from esclicier, esclichier, to break to pieces, of German origin; cf. OHG. slzan to split, slit, tear, G. schleissen to slit. See Slit, v. t.]

  4. Slice(verb)

    a salver, platter, or tray

    Etymology: [OE. slice, sclice, OF. esclice, from esclicier, esclichier, to break to pieces, of German origin; cf. OHG. slzan to split, slit, tear, G. schleissen to slit. See Slit, v. t.]

  5. Slice(verb)

    a knife with a thin, broad blade for taking up or serving fish; also, a spatula for spreading anything, as paint or ink

    Etymology: [OE. slice, sclice, OF. esclice, from esclicier, esclichier, to break to pieces, of German origin; cf. OHG. slzan to split, slit, tear, G. schleissen to slit. See Slit, v. t.]

  6. Slice(verb)

    a plate of iron with a handle, forming a kind of chisel, or a spadelike implement, variously proportioned, and used for various purposes, as for stripping the planking from a vessel's side, for cutting blubber from a whale, or for stirring a fire of coals; a slice bar; a peel; a fire shovel

    Etymology: [OE. slice, sclice, OF. esclice, from esclicier, esclichier, to break to pieces, of German origin; cf. OHG. slzan to split, slit, tear, G. schleissen to slit. See Slit, v. t.]

  7. Slice(verb)

    one of the wedges by which the cradle and the ship are lifted clear of the building blocks to prepare for launching

    Etymology: [OE. slice, sclice, OF. esclice, from esclicier, esclichier, to break to pieces, of German origin; cf. OHG. slzan to split, slit, tear, G. schleissen to slit. See Slit, v. t.]

  8. Slice(verb)

    a removable sliding bottom to galley

    Etymology: [OE. slice, sclice, OF. esclice, from esclicier, esclichier, to break to pieces, of German origin; cf. OHG. slzan to split, slit, tear, G. schleissen to slit. See Slit, v. t.]

  9. Slice(verb)

    to cut into thin pieces, or to cut off a thin, broad piece from

    Etymology: [OE. slice, sclice, OF. esclice, from esclicier, esclichier, to break to pieces, of German origin; cf. OHG. slzan to split, slit, tear, G. schleissen to slit. See Slit, v. t.]

  10. Slice(verb)

    to cut into parts; to divide

    Etymology: [OE. slice, sclice, OF. esclice, from esclicier, esclichier, to break to pieces, of German origin; cf. OHG. slzan to split, slit, tear, G. schleissen to slit. See Slit, v. t.]

  11. Slice(verb)

    to clear by means of a slice bar, as a fire or the grate bars of a furnace

    Etymology: [OE. slice, sclice, OF. esclice, from esclicier, esclichier, to break to pieces, of German origin; cf. OHG. slzan to split, slit, tear, G. schleissen to slit. See Slit, v. t.]

Freebase

  1. Slice

    Slice is a line of fruit-flavored soft drinks manufactured by PepsiCo and introduced in 1984. Varieties of Slice have included lemon-lime, apple, fruit punch, grape, passionfruit, peach glaze, Mandarin orange, pineapple, strawberry, Cherry Cola, "Red", Cherry-Lime, and Dr Slice. Until 1994, the drink contained 10% fruit juice. The original design of the can was a solid color related to the flavor of the drink. These were replaced in 1994 with black cans that featured colorful bursts, along with slicker graphics. In 1997, the cans became blue with color-coordinated swirls. The original orange flavor was reformulated around this time with the new slogan, "It's orange, only twisted." Orange Slice has since been changed back to its original flavor. In the summer of 2000, lemon-lime Slice was replaced in most markets by Sierra Mist, which became a national brand in 2003. The rest of the Slice line was replaced in most markets by Tropicana Twister Soda in the summer of 2005, although the Dr. Slice variety can still be found in some fountains.

Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

  1. Slice

    slīs, v.t. to slit or divide into thin pieces.—n. a thin broad piece: a broad knife for serving fish.—n. Slī′cer, one who, or that which, slices: a broad, flat knife. [O. Fr. esclice—Old High Ger. slīzan, to split.]

Dictionary of Military and Associated Terms

  1. slice

    An average logistic planning factor used to obtain estimates of requirements for personnel and materiel. (e.g., a personnel slice generally consists of the total strength of the stated basic combatant elements, plus its proportionate share of all supporting and higher headquarters personnel.)

Dictionary of Nautical Terms

  1. slice

    A bar of iron with a flat, sharp, spear-shaped end, used in stripping off sheathing, ceiling, and the like. The whaler's slice is a slender chisel about four inches wide, used to cut into, and flinch the fish.

British National Corpus

  1. Nouns Frequency

    Rank popularity for the word 'slice' in Nouns Frequency: #2358

Anagrams for slice »

  1. Leics

  2. ceils

How to pronounce slice?

  1. Alex
    Alex
    US English
    Daniel
    Daniel
    British
    Karen
    Karen
    Australian
    Veena
    Veena
    Indian

How to say slice in sign language?

  1. slice

Numerology

  1. Chaldean Numerology

    The numerical value of slice in Chaldean Numerology is: 6

  2. Pythagorean Numerology

    The numerical value of slice in Pythagorean Numerology is: 3

Examples of slice in a Sentence

  1. Alfred Hitchcock:

    For me, the cinema is not a slice of life, but a piece of cake.

  2. Jim Mahoney:

    I was on the tee at Winged Foot, me and a friend of mine, phil got out his driver and was bouncing the ball off the face. Phil looked over to the 17th green and there's a scoreboard. It showed that (Colin) Montgomerie had just double bogeyed the 18th. His whole demeanor changed. But he hits this horrendous slice.

  3. Lee Won-sik:

    If Apple uses OLED for all models for next year, that could raise hopes for LG Display to take a slice, as Apple may want to diversify its sources for OLED supply.

  4. John Loughrey:

    I've been sleeping out for three days ... I'm delighted they have a healthy baby and a healthy mother, we celebrated with them today with champagne, we'll have fish and chips and a slice of American pie!

  5. Novak Djokovic:

    He has probably the best one?handed backhand on the tour. No question one of the best one?handed backhands that I have seen in tennis, very powerful and can create a lot of spin, a lot of rotation on the ball. Novak Djokovic can hit it flat down the line. Novak Djokovic can block the ball very well. Novak Djokovic has a short slice, long slice. Novak Djokovic has a lot of variety from that part of Novak Djokovic baseline game.

Images & Illustrations of slice

  1. slicesliceslicesliceslice

Popularity rank by frequency of use

slice#10000#10568#100000

Translations for slice

From our Multilingual Translation Dictionary

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