What does sequel mean?

Definitions for sequel
ˈsi kwəlse·quel

This dictionary definitions page includes all the possible meanings, example usage and translations of the word sequel.

Princeton's WordNet

  1. sequel, subsequencenoun

    something that follows something else

  2. sequel, continuationnoun

    a part added to a book or play that continues and extends it

Wiktionary

  1. sequelnoun

    A narrative that is written after another narrative set in the same universe, especially a narrative that is chronologically set after its predecessors, or (perhaps improper usage) any narrative that has a preceding narrative of its own.

  2. sequelnoun

    Plural form of sequela.

  3. Etymology: From sequela, from sequi.

Samuel Johnson's Dictionary

  1. Sequelnoun

    Etymology: sequelle, French; sequela, Latin.

    If black scandal or foul-fac’d reproach
    Attend the sequel of your imposition,
    Your meer enforcement shall acquittance me. William Shakespeare, R. III.

    Was he not a man of wisdom? Yes, but he was poor: but was he not also successful? True, but still he was poor: and once grant this, and you cannot keep off that unavoidable sequel in the next verse, the poor man’s wisdom is despised. Robert South, Sermons.

    Let any principal thing, as the sun or the moon, but once cease, fail, or swerve, and who doth not easily conceive that the sequel thereof would be ruin both to itself and whatsoever dependeth on it? Richard Hooker.

    In these he put two weights,
    The sequel each of parting and of fight. John Milton, Par. Lost.

    What sequel is there in this argument? An archdeacon is the chief deacon: ergo, he is only a deacon. John Whitgift.

Wikipedia

  1. Sequel

    A sequel is a work of literature, film, theatre, television, music or video game that continues the story of, or expands upon, some earlier work. In the common context of a narrative work of fiction, a sequel portrays events set in the same fictional universe as an earlier work, usually chronologically following the events of that work.In many cases, the sequel continues elements of the original story, often with the same characters and settings. A sequel can lead to a series, in which key elements appear repeatedly. Although the difference between more than one sequel and a series is somewhat arbitrary, it is clear that some media franchises have enough sequels to become a series, whether originally planned as such or not.Sequels are attractive to creators and to publishers because there is less risk involved in returning to a story with known popularity rather than developing new and untested characters and settings. Audiences are sometimes eager for more stories about popular characters or settings, making the production of sequels financially appealing.In film, sequels are very common. There are many name formats for sequels. Sometimes, they either have unrelated titles or have a letter added on the end. More commonly, they have numbers at the end or have added words on the end. It is also common for a sequel to have a variation of the original title or have a subtitle. In the 1930s, many musical sequels had the year included in the title. Sometimes sequels are released with different titles in different countries, because of the perceived brand recognition. There are several ways that subsequent works can be related to the chronology of the original. Various neologisms have been coined to describe them.

ChatGPT

  1. sequel

    A sequel is a literary, film, or play work that continues the narrative of a preceding work. It usually presents the development or events occurring after those of the original narrative, often focusing on the same characters and settings. Sequels are generally created due to the popularity and success of the original work, with the aim of continuing the story or expanding on the fictional universe.

Webster Dictionary

  1. Sequelnoun

    that which follows; a succeeding part; continuation; as, the sequel of a man's advantures or history

  2. Sequelnoun

    consequence; event; effect; result; as, let the sun cease, fail, or swerve, and the sequel would be ruin

  3. Sequelnoun

    conclusion; inference

  4. Etymology: [L. sequela, fr. sequit to follow: cf. F. squelle a following. See Sue to follow.]

Wikidata

  1. Sequel

    A sequel is a narrative, documental, or other work of literature, film, theatre or music that continues the story of, or expands upon, some earlier work. In the common context of a narrative work of fiction, a sequel portrays events set in the same fictional universe as an earlier work, usually chronologically following the events of that work. In many cases, the sequel continues elements of the original story, often with the same characters and settings. A sequel can lead to a series, in which key elements appear in a number of stories. Although the difference between more than one sequel and a series is somewhat arbitrary, it is clear that some media franchises have enough sequels to become a series, whether originally planned as such or not. Sequels are attractive to creators and to publishers because there is less risk involved in returning to a story with known popularity rather than developing new and untested characters and settings. Audiences are sometimes eager for more stories about popular characters or settings, making the production of sequels financially appealing. In movies, sequels are common. There are many name formats for sequels. Usually, they either have unrelated titles, such as The Jewel of the Nile, the sequel to Romancing the Stone, or the same title as the original, but with a number added, as in Lethal Weapon 2, sequel to Lethal Weapon. Sometimes such titles have subtitles as well. It is also common for a sequel to have a variation of the original title. In the 1930s, many musical sequels had the year included in the title, in the style of Broadway revues such as the Ziegfeld Follies.

Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

  1. Sequel

    sē′kwel, n. that which follows, the succeeding part: result, consequence: (obs.) descendants: (Scots law) thirlage. [Fr.,—L. sequelasequi; Gr. hepesthai, to follow.]

Dictionary of Military and Associated Terms

  1. sequel

    In a campaign, a major operation that follows the current major operation. In a single major operation, a sequel is the next phase. Plans for a sequel are based on the possible outcomes (success, stalemate, or defeat) associated with the current operation. See also branch.

Matched Categories

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Numerology

  1. Chaldean Numerology

    The numerical value of sequel in Chaldean Numerology is: 5

  2. Pythagorean Numerology

    The numerical value of sequel in Pythagorean Numerology is: 7

Examples of sequel in a Sentence

  1. Marc Toberoff:

    Miller now owns the copyright to his screenplay, including sequel rights, but Jason can't be portrayed as any older than in the first movie ? Makes no sense, jason was very much a presence in Miller's film. In fact, Jason Voorhees channeled Jason. And, of course, the first was all teed up for sequels.

  2. Steve Latshaw:

    Jimmie was my teacher, mentor, close friend and collaborator for 26 years, i directed two of his feature films, including the recent 'Return of the Killer Shrews,' a sequel he co-wrote and was quite proud of as he had made the first one more than 50 years earlier.

  3. Gregory Jacobs:

    We started thinking about a sequel, honestly, really early on.

  4. Ben Stiller:

    When ('Zoolander') came out, not everybody saw it. It was, a little bit, I guess, out there. And somehow it got discovered over the years, which has been great, we didn't ever think we were actually going to do a sequel and then the last few years the momentum started building and now all the pieces came together.

  5. Jonathan Burnham:

    The existence of' Go Set a Watchman' was unknown until recently, and its discovery is an extraordinary gift to the many readers and fans of' To Kill a Mockingbird,' reading in many ways like a sequel to Harper Lee's classic novel, it is a compelling and ultimately moving narrative about a father and a daughter's relationship, and the life of a small Alabama town living through the racial tensions of the 1950s.

Popularity rank by frequency of use

sequel#10000#13122#100000

Translations for sequel

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"sequel." Definitions.net. STANDS4 LLC, 2024. Web. 19 May 2024. <https://www.definitions.net/definition/sequel>.

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