What does scout mean?

Definitions for scout
skaʊtscout

Here are all the possible meanings and translations of the word scout.

Princeton's WordNet

  1. lookout, lookout man, sentinel, sentry, watch, spotter, scout, picket(noun)

    a person employed to keep watch for some anticipated event

  2. Scout(noun)

    a Boy Scout or Girl Scout

  3. scout, talent scout(noun)

    someone employed to discover and recruit talented persons (especially in the worlds of entertainment or sports)

  4. scout, pathfinder, guide(verb)

    someone who can find paths through unexplored territory

  5. scout, reconnoiter, reconnoitre(verb)

    explore, often with the goal of finding something or somebody

GCIDE

  1. Scout(n.)

    A boy scout or girl scout (which see, above).

    Etymology: [OF. escoute scout, spy, fr. escouter, escolter, to listen, to hear, F. couter, fr. L. auscultare, to hear with attention, to listen to. See Auscultation.]

Wiktionary

  1. scout(Noun)

    A swift sailing boat.

  2. scout(Noun)

    A projecting rock.

  3. scout(Noun)

    The act of scouting or reconnoitering.

  4. scout(Noun)

    A college student's or undergraduate's servant; -- so called in Oxford, England; at Cambridge called a gyp; and at Dublin, a skip.

  5. scout(Verb)

    To reject with contempt, as something absurd; to treat with ridicule; to flout; as, to scout an idea or an apology.

  6. scout(Verb)

    To explore a wide terrain, as on a search.

  7. scout(Noun)

    A person sent out to gain and bring in tidings; especially, one employed in war to gain information about the enemy and ground.

    Etymology: From Middle English scout, scoult, from Old French escoute ("action of listening") , verbal noun from escouter ("to listen, heed") , from Latin auscultare ("to listen") . The verb comes from the noun.[1]

  8. scout(Noun)

    An act of scouting or reconnoitering.

    while the rat is on the scout

    Etymology: From Middle English scout, scoult, from Old French escoute ("action of listening") , verbal noun from escouter ("to listen, heed") , from Latin auscultare ("to listen") . The verb comes from the noun.[1]

  9. scout(Noun)

    A member of any number of youth organizations belonging to the international scout movement, such as the Boy Scouts of America or Girl Scouts of the United States.

    Etymology: From Middle English scout, scoult, from Old French escoute ("action of listening") , verbal noun from escouter ("to listen, heed") , from Latin auscultare ("to listen") . The verb comes from the noun.[1]

  10. scout(Noun)

    A person who assesses and/or recruits others; especially, one who identifies promising talent on behalf of a sports team.

    We have met twice this year and, during our first interview, Mata spoke evocatively when remembering how, having joined Real Oviedo aged 10 in 1998, he was given a previously unimaginable opportunity. Mata sat in a car park in 2003, when he was 14, and watched his father talking to a Real Madrid scout.

    Etymology: From Middle English scout, scoult, from Old French escoute ("action of listening") , verbal noun from escouter ("to listen, heed") , from Latin auscultare ("to listen") . The verb comes from the noun.[1]

  11. scout(Noun)

    A college servant, originally implying a male servant, attending to students or undergraduates in a variety of ways that includes cleaning; corresponding to the duties of a gyp or possibly bedder at Cambridge University; and at Dublin, a skip.

    Etymology: From Middle English scout, scoult, from Old French escoute ("action of listening") , verbal noun from escouter ("to listen, heed") , from Latin auscultare ("to listen") . The verb comes from the noun.[1]

  12. scout(Noun)

    A fielder in a game for practice.

    Etymology: From Middle English scout, scoult, from Old French escoute ("action of listening") , verbal noun from escouter ("to listen, heed") , from Latin auscultare ("to listen") . The verb comes from the noun.[1]

  13. scout(Noun)

    A fighter aircraft.

    Etymology: From Middle English scout, scoult, from Old French escoute ("action of listening") , verbal noun from escouter ("to listen, heed") , from Latin auscultare ("to listen") . The verb comes from the noun.[1]

  14. scout(Noun)

    Term of address for a man or boy.

    "Listen, old scout," Mr. Osborn said solemnly, "you think New York is heartless, but that's not what it is."

    Etymology: From Middle English scout, scoult, from Old French escoute ("action of listening") , verbal noun from escouter ("to listen, heed") , from Latin auscultare ("to listen") . The verb comes from the noun.[1]

Webster Dictionary

  1. Scout(noun)

    a swift sailing boat

    Etymology: [OF. escoute scout, spy, fr. escouter, escolter, to listen, to hear, F. couter, fr. L. auscultare, to hear with attention, to listen to. See Auscultation.]

  2. Scout(noun)

    a projecting rock

    Etymology: [OF. escoute scout, spy, fr. escouter, escolter, to listen, to hear, F. couter, fr. L. auscultare, to hear with attention, to listen to. See Auscultation.]

  3. Scout(verb)

    to reject with contempt, as something absurd; to treat with ridicule; to flout; as, to scout an idea or an apology

    Etymology: [OF. escoute scout, spy, fr. escouter, escolter, to listen, to hear, F. couter, fr. L. auscultare, to hear with attention, to listen to. See Auscultation.]

  4. Scout(noun)

    a person sent out to gain and bring in tidings; especially, one employed in war to gain information of the movements and condition of an enemy

    Etymology: [OF. escoute scout, spy, fr. escouter, escolter, to listen, to hear, F. couter, fr. L. auscultare, to hear with attention, to listen to. See Auscultation.]

  5. Scout(noun)

    a college student's or undergraduate's servant; -- so called in Oxford, England; at Cambridge called a gyp; and at Dublin, a skip

    Etymology: [OF. escoute scout, spy, fr. escouter, escolter, to listen, to hear, F. couter, fr. L. auscultare, to hear with attention, to listen to. See Auscultation.]

  6. Scout(noun)

    a fielder in a game for practice

    Etymology: [OF. escoute scout, spy, fr. escouter, escolter, to listen, to hear, F. couter, fr. L. auscultare, to hear with attention, to listen to. See Auscultation.]

  7. Scout(noun)

    the act of scouting or reconnoitering

    Etymology: [OF. escoute scout, spy, fr. escouter, escolter, to listen, to hear, F. couter, fr. L. auscultare, to hear with attention, to listen to. See Auscultation.]

  8. Scout(verb)

    to observe, watch, or look for, as a scout; to follow for the purpose of observation, as a scout

    Etymology: [OF. escoute scout, spy, fr. escouter, escolter, to listen, to hear, F. couter, fr. L. auscultare, to hear with attention, to listen to. See Auscultation.]

  9. Scout(verb)

    to pass over or through, as a scout; to reconnoiter; as, to scout a country

    Etymology: [OF. escoute scout, spy, fr. escouter, escolter, to listen, to hear, F. couter, fr. L. auscultare, to hear with attention, to listen to. See Auscultation.]

  10. Scout(verb)

    to go on the business of scouting, or watching the motions of an enemy; to act as a scout

    Etymology: [OF. escoute scout, spy, fr. escouter, escolter, to listen, to hear, F. couter, fr. L. auscultare, to hear with attention, to listen to. See Auscultation.]

Freebase

  1. Scout

    The Scout family of rockets were American launch vehicles designed to place small satellites into orbit around the Earth. The Scout multistage rocket was the first orbital launch vehicle to be entirely composed of solid fuel stages. The original Scout was designed in 1957 at the NACA Langley center. Scouts were used from 1961 until 1994. To enhance reliability the development team opted to use "off the shelf" hardware, originally produced for military programs. According to the NASA fact sheet: ... the first stage motor was a combination of the Jupiter Senior and the Navy Polaris; the second stage came from the Army MGM-29 Sergeant; and the third and fourth stage motors were designed by Langley engineers who adapted a version of the Navy Vanguard. The first successful orbital launch of a Scout, on February 16, 1961, delivered Explorer 9, a 7-kg satellite used for atmospheric density studies, into orbit. The final launch of a Scout, using a Scout G-1, was on May 9, 1994. The payload was the Miniature Sensor Technology Integration 2 military spacecraft with a mass of 163 kg, which remained in orbit until 1998.

Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

  1. Scout

    skowt, n. one sent out to bring in tidings, observe the enemy, &c.: a spy: a sneak: in cricket, a fielder: the act of watching: a bird of the auk family: a college servant at Oxford, the same as gyp in Cambridge and skip in Dublin.—v.t. to watch closely.—n. Scout′-mas′ter, an officer who has the direction of army scouts. [O. Fr. escoute—escouter (It. ascoltare)—L. auscultāre, to listen—auris, the ear.]

  2. Scout

    skowt, v.t. to sneer at: to reject with disdain.—adv. Scout′ingly, sneeringly. [Scand.,—Ice. skúta, skúti, a taunt—skjóta, to shoot.]

  3. Scout

    skowt, v.i. (Scot.) to pour forth a liquid forcibly, esp. excrement.—n. the guillemot.

Military Dictionary and Gazetteer

  1. scout

    A person sent out in the front or on the flank of an army to observe the force and movements of the enemy. He should be a keen observer, and withal fleet of foot, or well mounted.

Editors Contribution

  1. scout

    A boy or girl with membership of a specific youth organization.

    The boy scout and girl scout went on a trip together.

    Submitted by MaryC on March 9, 2020  

Suggested Resources

  1. scout

    Song lyrics by scout -- Explore a large variety of song lyrics performed by scout on the Lyrics.com website.

How to pronounce scout?

  1. Alex
    Alex
    US English
    Daniel
    Daniel
    British
    Karen
    Karen
    Australian
    Veena
    Veena
    Indian

How to say scout in sign language?

  1. scout

Numerology

  1. Chaldean Numerology

    The numerical value of scout in Chaldean Numerology is: 5

  2. Pythagorean Numerology

    The numerical value of scout in Pythagorean Numerology is: 6

Examples of scout in a Sentence

  1. Anthony Bourdain:

    I'm sure I'm not alone here. Were clowns ever funny? No. Of course not. They were always sinister figures, disguising their homicidal intentions under thick make-up, all the while their crawl spaces and chest freezers were brimming with Cub Scout parts.

  2. Eliana Bookbinder:

    I pointed out that this was a massive violation of the Scout law, part of the Scout law is to be thoughtful and to be kind, and this was neither. She said that she and her brother picked up the bird fairly easily and they both drove it to the wildlife center. Eliana Bookbinder said that later that night her boss berated them and said they had.

  3. Jeanette Piniones Navales:

    My kids are all doing good. Brooke, Wilder and Scout all huddled under our kitchen table till the shaking stopped, the dogs were more concerned as to what the heck we were doing under the table.

  4. Lance Whipple:

    It’s fantastic, it’s a no-brainer for us, we love being part of this organization because it is really kind of developing people’s skills that’s going to help them be successful in the future. And they’re Girl Scout cookies. Who does n’t like Girl Scout cookies ?

  5. Harper Lee:

    Scout, Atticus Boo : A Celebration of 50 Years of' To Kill a Mockingbird,' i haven't spoken to Harper Lee directly about this. And not many people have, except for Harper Lee agent and lawyer.

Images & Illustrations of scout

  1. scoutscoutscoutscoutscout

Popularity rank by frequency of use

scout#1#8744#10000

Translations for scout

From our Multilingual Translation Dictionary

  • كشافArabic
  • skaut, zvědCzech
  • talentspejder, spejderDanish
  • Kundschafterin, Pfadfinder, Pfadfinderin, auskundschaften, ausspähen, spähen, Kundschafter, Späher, Späherin, aufklären, beobachten, erkundenGerman
  • skoltoEsperanto
  • explorarSpanish
  • skautEstonian
  • partiointi, partiolainen, partioida, tiedustelija, tiedustelu, kykyjenmetsästäjäFinnish
  • skótiFaroese
  • éclaireur, reconnaître le terrain, aller en reconnaissance, reconnaissance, scout, partir en reconnaissance, explorerFrench
  • cserkészHungarian
  • pramukaIndonesian
  • flokksmeðlimurIcelandic
  • esploratore, esplorare, perlustrare, ricognizione, ScoutItalian
  • לְגַשֵׁשׁHebrew
  • スカウト, 斥候Japanese
  • exploratorLatin
  • matatauaMāori
  • извидување, извидувач, извидува, извидникMacedonian
  • verkenner, scout, verkenning, padvinder, talentenjagerDutch
  • scoutNorwegian
  • harcerz, skaut, skautka, harcerka, harcownikPolish
  • batimento, escoteiro, batedor, olheiro, baterPortuguese
  • скаут, пионерка, разведка, бойска́ут, пионер, отвергать, пренебрегать, разведчикRussian
  • scoutSwedish
  • சாரணர்Tamil
  • keşfetmekTurkish
  • jiboskotan, hiboskotan, boskotanVolapük

Get even more translations for scout »

Translation

Find a translation for the scout definition in other languages:

Select another language:

  • - Select -
  • 简体中文 (Chinese - Simplified)
  • 繁體中文 (Chinese - Traditional)
  • Español (Spanish)
  • Esperanto (Esperanto)
  • 日本語 (Japanese)
  • Português (Portuguese)
  • Deutsch (German)
  • العربية (Arabic)
  • Français (French)
  • Русский (Russian)
  • ಕನ್ನಡ (Kannada)
  • 한국어 (Korean)
  • עברית (Hebrew)
  • Gaeilge (Irish)
  • Українська (Ukrainian)
  • اردو (Urdu)
  • Magyar (Hungarian)
  • मानक हिन्दी (Hindi)
  • Indonesia (Indonesian)
  • Italiano (Italian)
  • தமிழ் (Tamil)
  • Türkçe (Turkish)
  • తెలుగు (Telugu)
  • ภาษาไทย (Thai)
  • Tiếng Việt (Vietnamese)
  • Čeština (Czech)
  • Polski (Polish)
  • Bahasa Indonesia (Indonesian)
  • Românește (Romanian)
  • Nederlands (Dutch)
  • Ελληνικά (Greek)
  • Latinum (Latin)
  • Svenska (Swedish)
  • Dansk (Danish)
  • Suomi (Finnish)
  • فارسی (Persian)
  • ייִדיש (Yiddish)
  • հայերեն (Armenian)
  • Norsk (Norwegian)
  • English (English)

Word of the Day

Would you like us to send you a FREE new word definition delivered to your inbox daily?

Please enter your email address:


Discuss these scout definitions with the community:

0 Comments

    Citation

    Use the citation below to add this definition to your bibliography:

    Style:MLAChicagoAPA

    "scout." Definitions.net. STANDS4 LLC, 2020. Web. 2 Dec. 2020. <https://www.definitions.net/definition/scout>.

    Are we missing a good definition for scout? Don't keep it to yourself...

    Free, no signup required:

    Add to Chrome

    Get instant definitions for any word that hits you anywhere on the web!

    Free, no signup required:

    Add to Firefox

    Get instant definitions for any word that hits you anywhere on the web!

    Nearby & related entries:

    Alternative searches for scout:


    Thanks for your vote! We truly appreciate your support.