What does revolution mean?

Definitions for revolution
ˌrɛv əˈlu ʃənrev·o·lu·tion

Here are all the possible meanings and translations of the word revolution.

Princeton's WordNet

  1. revolution(noun)

    a drastic and far-reaching change in ways of thinking and behaving

    "the industrial revolution was also a cultural revolution"

  2. revolution(noun)

    the overthrow of a government by those who are governed

  3. rotation, revolution, gyration(noun)

    a single complete turn (axial or orbital)

    "the plane made three rotations before it crashed"; "the revolution of the earth about the sun takes one year"

Wiktionary

  1. revolution(Noun)

    A political upheaval in a government or nation state characterized by great change.

    Etymology: From reuolucion, from revolution, from revolutionem, accusative singular of revolutio, from revolvo; see revolve.

  2. revolution(Noun)

    The removal and replacement of a government.

    Etymology: From reuolucion, from revolution, from revolutionem, accusative singular of revolutio, from revolvo; see revolve.

  3. revolution(Noun)

    Rotation: the turning of an object around an axis.

    Etymology: From reuolucion, from revolution, from revolutionem, accusative singular of revolutio, from revolvo; see revolve.

  4. revolution(Noun)

    A rotation: one complete turn of an object during rotation.

    Etymology: From reuolucion, from revolution, from revolutionem, accusative singular of revolutio, from revolvo; see revolve.

  5. revolution(Noun)

    In the case of celestial bodies - the traversal of one body through an orbit around another body.

    Etymology: From reuolucion, from revolution, from revolutionem, accusative singular of revolutio, from revolvo; see revolve.

  6. revolution(Noun)

    A sudden, vast change in a situation, a discipline, or the way of thinking and behaving.

    Etymology: From reuolucion, from revolution, from revolutionem, accusative singular of revolutio, from revolvo; see revolve.

Webster Dictionary

  1. Revolution(noun)

    the act of revolving, or turning round on an axis or a center; the motion of a body round a fixed point or line; rotation; as, the revolution of a wheel, of a top, of the earth on its axis, etc

    Etymology: [F. rvolution, L. revolutio. See Revolve.]

  2. Revolution(noun)

    return to a point before occupied, or to a point relatively the same; a rolling back; return; as, revolution in an ellipse or spiral

    Etymology: [F. rvolution, L. revolutio. See Revolve.]

  3. Revolution(noun)

    the space measured by the regular return of a revolving body; the period made by the regular recurrence of a measure of time, or by a succession of similar events

    Etymology: [F. rvolution, L. revolutio. See Revolve.]

  4. Revolution(noun)

    the motion of any body, as a planet or satellite, in a curved line or orbit, until it returns to the same point again, or to a point relatively the same; -- designated as the annual, anomalistic, nodical, sidereal, or tropical revolution, according as the point of return or completion has a fixed relation to the year, the anomaly, the nodes, the stars, or the tropics; as, the revolution of the earth about the sun; the revolution of the moon about the earth

    Etymology: [F. rvolution, L. revolutio. See Revolve.]

  5. Revolution(noun)

    the motion of a point, line, or surface about a point or line as its center or axis, in such a manner that a moving point generates a curve, a moving line a surface (called a surface of revolution), and a moving surface a solid (called a solid of revolution); as, the revolution of a right-angled triangle about one of its sides generates a cone; the revolution of a semicircle about the diameter generates a sphere

    Etymology: [F. rvolution, L. revolutio. See Revolve.]

  6. Revolution(noun)

    a total or radical change; as, a revolution in one's circumstances or way of living

    Etymology: [F. rvolution, L. revolutio. See Revolve.]

  7. Revolution(noun)

    a fundamental change in political organization, or in a government or constitution; the overthrow or renunciation of one government, and the substitution of another, by the governed

    Etymology: [F. rvolution, L. revolutio. See Revolve.]

Freebase

  1. Revolution

    A revolution is a fundamental change in power or organizational structures that takes place in a relatively short period of time. Aristotle described two types of political revolution: ⁕Complete change from one constitution to another ⁕Modification of an existing constitution. Revolutions have occurred through human history and vary widely in terms of methods, duration, and motivating ideology. Their results include major changes in culture, economy, and socio-political institutions. Scholarly debates about what does and does not constitute a revolution center around several issues. Early studies of revolutions primarily analyzed events in European history from a psychological perspective, but more modern examinations include global events and incorporate perspectives from several social sciences, including sociology and political science. Several generations of scholarly thought on revolutions have generated many competing theories and contributed much to the current understanding of this complex phenomenon.

Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

  1. Revolution

    rev-ō-lū′shun, n. act of revolving: motion round a centre: course which brings to the same point or state: space measured by a revolving body: a radical change, as of one's way of living: fundamental change in the government of a country: a revolt: a complete rotation through 360°: a round of periodic changes, as the revolutions of the seasons: the winding of a spiral about its axis: change of circumstances: consideration.—adj. Revolū′tionary, pertaining to, or tending to, a revolution in government.—v.t. Revolū′tionise, to cause a revolution or entire change of anything.—ns. Revolū′tionism; Revolū′tionist, one who promotes or favours a revolution.—The American Revolution, the change from the position of colonies to that of national independence effected by the thirteen American colonies of England in 1776; The French Revolution, the downfall of the old French monarchy and the old absolutism (1789); The Revolution, the expulsion of James II. from the throne of England (1689), and the establishment of a really constitutional government under William III. and Mary. [Revolve.]

The Nuttall Encyclopedia

  1. Revolution

    a sudden change for most part in the constitution of a country in consequence of internal revolt, particularly when a monarchy is superseded by a republic, as in France in 1789, in 1848, and 1870, that in 1830 being merely from one branch of the Bourbon family to another, such as that also in England in 1658. The French Revolution of 1798 is the revolution by pre-eminence, and the years 1848-49 were years of revolutions in Europe.

Military Dictionary and Gazetteer

  1. revolution

    In politics, any extensive change in the constitution of a country suddenly brought about. The most important events in history known under this name are: The destruction of the Assyrian empire, and the foundation of that of the Medes and Persians by Cyrus the Great, 536 B.C.; the foundation of the Macedonian empire on the destruction of the Persian, by the defeat of Darius Codomanus, by Alexander the Great, 331 B.C.; the establishment of the Roman empire on the ruins of the republic by Julius Cæsar, 47 B.C.; the establishment of the empire of the Western Franks under Charlemagne, 800; the revolution in Portugal, by which the Portuguese threw off the Spanish yoke and placed John, duke of Braganza, on the throne, 1640; the English revolution of the 17th century, which began in the early part of the reign of Charles I., with the struggle between that king and his Parliament. In 1642, the struggle became a civil war, in which the Parliament obtained the ascendency, and brought Charles to the block in 1649. A republic followed, under the protectorate of Oliver Cromwell, which was succeeded in 1660 by the restoration of monarchy in the person of Charles II.; but the arbitrary rule of James II. brought the king and people again into antagonism, and James having fled the country, William III. was called to the throne under such conditions and safeguards as secured the balance of the constitution. The revolutions in Russia, 1730 and 1762. The French revolution was a violent reaction against that absolutism which had come in the course of time to supplant the old feudal institutions of the country. It began with an outbreak of insurrectionary movements at Paris in July, 1789, including the destruction of the Bastile. On January 21, 1793, King Louis XVI. was beheaded. A disastrous reign of terror followed (see Reign of Terror), which was brought to an end in 1794. The revolution in Sweden, 1772 and 1809; in Holland, 1795, and counter-revolution in 1813; in Poland, 1704, 1795, and 1830. The American Revolution of 1775, by which the United States threw off their dependence on Great Britain. The French revolution of 1830, which drove Charles X. into exile, and raised Louis Philippe, duke of Orleans, to the throne by the will of the people; as also the revolution of 1848, when France rose against Louis Philippe and adopted for a time a republican form of government; which was followed by the revolution of 1851. The revolutions in the Netherlands, and in Brunswick, 1830; in Brazil, 1831; in Hungary, 1848; in Rome, 1798 and 1848; in Italy, 1859-60, when the various minor sovereigns were driven into exile, and the whole of the peninsula, with the exception of the Roman and Venetian territory, became subject to the constitutional sway of Victor Emmanuel; in the United States, 1860-65; in the Danubian principalities, 1869; and the Papal States, suppressed, October, 1867.

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  1. revolution

    Song lyrics by revolution -- Explore a large variety of song lyrics performed by revolution on the Lyrics.com website.

British National Corpus

  1. Spoken Corpus Frequency

    Rank popularity for the word 'revolution' in Spoken Corpus Frequency: #2259

  2. Written Corpus Frequency

    Rank popularity for the word 'revolution' in Written Corpus Frequency: #2241

  3. Nouns Frequency

    Rank popularity for the word 'revolution' in Nouns Frequency: #934

How to pronounce revolution?

  1. Alex
    Alex
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    Daniel
    Daniel
    British
    Karen
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    Australian
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How to say revolution in sign language?

  1. revolution

Numerology

  1. Chaldean Numerology

    The numerical value of revolution in Chaldean Numerology is: 1

  2. Pythagorean Numerology

    The numerical value of revolution in Pythagorean Numerology is: 7

Examples of revolution in a Sentence

  1. Frank Kendall:

    I became alarmed as soon as I started seeing technical intelligence reports on China’s modernization programs. I could say the same of Russia’s modernization programs as well. We came out of the Cold War with a very dominant military. We demonstrated that military conclusively in the first Gulf War and we used it effectively against any conventional force since. Since 2001 we’ve been involved in counter insurgency, the precision-munitions revolution that we demonstrated has been emulated by others.

  2. Ali Mottahari:

    The only work of the Assembly of Experts should not be to elect the Leader, god willing, the leader of the revolution will be alive for many years. But they need to do their own work, to enquire and probe and inspect.

  3. Iraj Harirchi:

    Qassem Soleimani said. That was under Irans Shiite shah, toppled in the 1979 revolution. But even after, Iran fought off other outbreaks, and its hospitals, doctors and nurses are known as some of the best in the wider Middle East, with a network of clinics from villages to big cities. However, the system appears to be stretching at the seams, with online videos purporting to show field hospitals going up. Meanwhile, Irans Shiite 80 million people, whose sense of high risk has been dulled by years of international isolation, crowd into grocery stores and butcher shops, suspicious of anything in the state media. Nowruz, the Persian New Year, looms on Friday, a holiday when millions travel. The government repeatedly has stopped short of ordering any major travel restrictions. It hasnt explained why, but there could be worry about further angering its people or slowing down its anemic, sanctions-hurt economy. Online videos show Iranians ignoring government demands to stay home and moving instead toward the coast of the Caspian Sea and the Persian Gulf. Residents of hard-hit Rasht, on Irans Shiite coast, have threatened to attack out-of-towners. We expect that, God willing, we can contain the rising trend of the disease, not the disease itself, by March 26, but I say this very frankly : if the great people dont cooperate, the disease will continue to be there until late May or even in June, and turn into a huge crisis. CLICK HERE FOR MORE CORONAVIRUS COVERAGE And the man who once called quarantines a thing of the past added :.

  4. Qassem Soleimani:

    The pretext of an illness and virus was used, and their media did not miss the slightest opportunity to discourage people from voting, Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei said. The election saw Irans Shiite lowest turnout since Islamic Revolution with mass demonstrations, with some voters wearing the masks that everyone soon would want. But people already were dying and fear was spreading. SHRINES AND HAZMAT SUITS Qom long has been the stronghold of Irans Shiite clergy. A focal point of devotion is the golden-domed shrine of Fatima Masumeh, a Shiite saint. Crowds pray there 24 hours a day, seven days a week, touching and kissing the shrine. That raises the risks for visitors.In Saudi Arabia, authorities have closed off access to the holiest sites in Islamover concerns about the virus. Churches, mosques, temples and shrines around the world have been closed or subject to stringent disinfecting campaigns. But in Qom and elsewhere in Iran, the shrines stayed open despite civilian health authorities demanding they close. Mohammad Saidi, who oversees the Fatima Masumeh shrine, insinuated that closing shrines was part of a plot against Irans Shiite by President Donald Trump. Defeating Qom is the dream of treacherous President Donald Trump and President Donald Trump domestic mercenaries, but this dream will not be realized even in their grave, Mohammad Saidi said on Feb. 22. That decision likely gave the virus time to spread. Police later arrested those who posted online video of themselves licking and kissing shrines. The citys religious epithet the nest of the Prophet and his family was intended to reassure believers worldwide that it was insulated against epidemics and other disasters, wrote Mehdi Khalaji, a Qom-trained Shiite theologian who is an analyst at the Washington Institute for Near-East Policy. If early reports about the spread of the coronavirus prove correct, Qoms status as the ideological capital of Islamic Revolution with mass demonstrations helped make it the pathogens transmitting center to the rest of Iran and at least seven other countries. IRAN REPORTS BIGGEST SINGLE-DAY JUMP OF CORONAVIRUS DEATHS AS PRESIDENT RULES OUT QUARANTINE Since then, hazmat-suited workers have fogged disinfectant and cleaned the shrines. Some mosques even hand out alcohol as a disinfectant to the poor despite Islam forbidding its consumption. By Monday night, the Fatima Masumeh shrine and another one in Mashhad had closed, only to see online videos purport to show hard-line faithful storming the shrines courtyard, demanding they open. But by that point, the virus had spread, reaching the highest levels of Irans Shiite theocracy. THE SITUATION IS TERRIBLE HERE AND I HOPE GOD HELPS US Like blood from a beating heart, the infections in Qom coursed out across Iran in maps later shared by the Health Ministry. In Tehran, the virus began moving through the government and the Shiite theocracy. Among those first infected was Iraj Harirchi, the deputy health minister who tested positive only a day after he downplayed the virus in a televised news conference. It didnt stop there. The virus killed Expediency Council member Mohammad Mirmohammadi, described as a close confidant of Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei. Hadi Khosroshahi, Irans Shiite former ambassador to the Vatican, and Ahmad Tuyserkani, an adviser to Irans Shiite judiciary chief, also died along with several lawmakers and a member of the countrys Assembly of Experts. The sick included Vice President Masoumeh Ebtekar, better known as Sister Mary, the English-speaking spokeswoman for the students who seized the U.S. Embassy in Tehran in 1979 in the 444-day hostage crisis. The virus also infected senior Vice President Eshaq Jahangiri and two other Cabinet members, along with Revolutionary Guard members and doctors. FILE — In this Feb. 24, 2020 file photo, released by the official website of the office of the Iranian Presidency, the head of Iran's counter-coronavirus task force, Iraj Harirchi, left, speaks at a press briefing with government spokesman Mohammad Ali, in Tehran, Iran. ( Iranian Presidency Office via AP, File) Soon, even Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei was seen wearing disposable gloves at a tree-planting ceremony. President Hassan Rouhani, 71, was pictured at a teleconference with the nearest official a few meters( several feet) away. The numbers soared. Irans death rate from the virus now is higher than in other hard-hit nations. That could be from the initial lack of testing kits and facilities. It also could be from what outside experts, Tehran lawmakers and other local leaders have alleged from the start : Iran was hiding the true number of infections and deaths. Authorities initially denied that, especially after the BBCs Persian service said deaths far exceeded those reported at the beginning of the crisis. But that denial appeared to weaken over time. We found out a little late that the coronavirus had entered Iran because we mistook it for the flu, Reza Malekzadeh, Reza Malekzadeh, later said. IRAN CORONAVIRUS DEATH TOLL TOPS 600 AS MIDDLE EASTERN COUNTRIES STEP UP CONTAINMENT MEASURES A man in Qom filmed rows of bodies in black bags and caskets awaiting burial for days in a trench lined with lime. He alleged all had tested positive for the coronavirus, although officials later said the bodies had been held pending test results. The situation is terrible here and I hope God helps us, he said while walking through the mortuary. Authorities later arrested him. PAST EXPERIENCES, NEW WORRIES Diseases have influenced Iranian history. Cholera outbreaks plagued its Qajar dynasty, long indebted to British and Russian powers. The chaos and debt set the stage for Irans 1906 Constitutional Revolution and the creation of parliament. That cholera outbreak saw Shiite religious leaders lash out at the West. Now, Iranian leaders, such as the head of Revolutionary Guard Revolutionary Guard and Khamenei himself, traffic in the baseless conspiracy theory that the coronavirus is a biological weapon created by the U.S., something echoed by Chinese officials as well. The psychology of the leadership in Iran has sort of an almost self-destructive need to double down on a lie just to sort of portray itself as competent, Afkhami said. Thats contrasted with the response to the El Tor strain of cholera that caused a pandemic through the 1960s. Iran produced millions of vaccine doses and inoculated its people, controlling its spread. It even gave broad-range antibiotics from the U.S. to pilgrims visiting Shiite shrines, Afkhami said. This rapid mobilization and this rapid response allowed the country to control the epidemic.

  5. Rachel Kyte:

    The technology revolution is happening on its own, the policy revolution is stuck or nascent in places, and then the finance revolution has to keep up with both.

Images & Illustrations of revolution

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Translations for revolution

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