What does revive mean?

Definitions for revive
rɪˈvaɪvre·vive

Here are all the possible meanings and translations of the word revive.

Princeton's WordNet

  1. resuscitate, reviveverb

    cause to regain consciousness

    "The doctors revived the comatose man"

  2. animate, recreate, reanimate, revive, renovate, repair, quicken, vivify, revivifyverb

    give new life or energy to

    "A hot soup will revive me"; "This will renovate my spirits"; "This treatment repaired my health"

  3. reviveverb

    be brought back to life, consciousness, or strength

    "Interest in ESP revived"

  4. revive, resurrectverb

    restore from a depressed, inactive, or unused state

    "He revived this style of opera"; "He resurrected the tango in this remote part of Argentina"

  5. come to, revive, resuscitateverb

    return to consciousness

    "The patient came to quickly"; "She revived after the doctor gave her an injection"

Wiktionary

  1. reviveverb

    To return to life; to recover life or strength; to live anew; to become reanimated or reinvigorated.

    Etymology: From revivre, revivere; prefix re- re- + vivere to live. See vivid.

  2. reviveverb

    To recover from a state of oblivion, obscurity, neglect, or depression; as, classical learning revived in the fifteenth century.

    In recent years, The Manx language has been revived after dying out and is now taught in some schools on the Isle of Man.

    Etymology: From revivre, revivere; prefix re- re- + vivere to live. See vivid.

  3. reviveverb

    To restore, or bring again to life; to reanimate.

    Hopefully this new paint job should revive the surgery waiting room

    Etymology: From revivre, revivere; prefix re- re- + vivere to live. See vivid.

  4. reviveverb

    To raise from coma, languor, depression, or discouragement; to bring into action after a suspension.

    Etymology: From revivre, revivere; prefix re- re- + vivere to live. See vivid.

  5. reviveverb

    Hence, to recover from a state of neglect or disuse; as, to revive letters or learning.

    Etymology: From revivre, revivere; prefix re- re- + vivere to live. See vivid.

  6. reviveverb

    To renew in the mind or memory; to bring to recollection; to recall attention to; to reawaken.

    The Harry Potter films revived the world's interest in wizardry

    Etymology: From revivre, revivere; prefix re- re- + vivere to live. See vivid.

  7. reviveverb

    To recover its natural or metallic state, as a metal.

    Etymology: From revivre, revivere; prefix re- re- + vivere to live. See vivid.

  8. reviveverb

    To restore or reduce to its natural or metallic state

    revive a metal after calcination.

    Etymology: From revivre, revivere; prefix re- re- + vivere to live. See vivid.

Webster Dictionary

  1. Reviveverb

    to return to life; to recover life or strength; to live anew; to become reanimated or reinvigorated

    Etymology: [F. revivere, L. revivere; pref. re- re- + vivere to live. See Vivid.]

  2. Reviveverb

    hence, to recover from a state of oblivion, obscurity, neglect, or depression; as, classical learning revived in the fifteenth century

    Etymology: [F. revivere, L. revivere; pref. re- re- + vivere to live. See Vivid.]

  3. Reviveverb

    to recover its natural or metallic state, as a metal

    Etymology: [F. revivere, L. revivere; pref. re- re- + vivere to live. See Vivid.]

  4. Reviveverb

    to restore, or bring again to life; to reanimate

    Etymology: [F. revivere, L. revivere; pref. re- re- + vivere to live. See Vivid.]

  5. Reviveverb

    to raise from coma, languor, depression, or discouragement; to bring into action after a suspension

    Etymology: [F. revivere, L. revivere; pref. re- re- + vivere to live. See Vivid.]

  6. Reviveverb

    hence, to recover from a state of neglect or disuse; as, to revive letters or learning

    Etymology: [F. revivere, L. revivere; pref. re- re- + vivere to live. See Vivid.]

  7. Reviveverb

    to renew in the mind or memory; to bring to recollection; to recall attention to; to reawaken

    Etymology: [F. revivere, L. revivere; pref. re- re- + vivere to live. See Vivid.]

  8. Reviveverb

    to restore or reduce to its natural or metallic state; as, to revive a metal after calcination

    Etymology: [F. revivere, L. revivere; pref. re- re- + vivere to live. See Vivid.]

Freebase

  1. Revive

    Revive is the self-published electronica album by musician Bjørn Lynne released in 2000.

Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

  1. Revive

    re-vīv′, v.i. to return to life, vigour, or fame: to recover from neglect, oblivion, or depression: to regain use or currency: to have the memory refreshed.—v.t. to restore to life again: to reawaken in the mind: to recover from neglect or depression: to bring again into public notice, as a play: to recall, to restore to use: to reproduce: (chem.) to restore to its natural state.—n. Revīvabil′ity.—adj. Revī′vable, capable of being revived.—adv. Revī′vably.—ns. Revī′val, recovery from languor, neglect, depression, &c.: renewed performance of, as of a play: renewed interest in or attention to: a time of extraordinary religious awakening: restoration: quickening: renewal, as of trade: awakening, as revival of learning: (law) reinstatement of an action; Revī′valism; Revī′valist, one who promotes religious revivals: an itinerant preacher.—adj. Revīvalis′tic.—ns. Revīve′ment; Revī′ver, one who, or that which, revives: a compound for renovating clothes; Revivificā′tion (chem.), the reduction of a metal from a state of combination to its natural state.—v.t. Reviv′ify, to cause to revive: to reanimate: to enliven.—v.i. to become efficient again as a reagent.—adv. Revī′vingly.—n. Revivis′cence, an awakening from torpidity, after hibernation.—adj. Revivis′cent.—n. Revī′vor (law), the revival of a suit which was abated by the death of a party or other cause.—The Anglo-Catholic revival, a strong reaction within the Church of England towards the views of doctrine and practice held by Laud and his school (see Tractarianism). [O. Fr. revivre—L. re-, again, vivĕre, to live.]

Suggested Resources

  1. revive

    Song lyrics by revive -- Explore a large variety of song lyrics performed by revive on the Lyrics.com website.

British National Corpus

  1. Verbs Frequency

    Rank popularity for the word 'revive' in Verbs Frequency: #926

How to pronounce revive?

How to say revive in sign language?

Numerology

  1. Chaldean Numerology

    The numerical value of revive in Chaldean Numerology is: 7

  2. Pythagorean Numerology

    The numerical value of revive in Pythagorean Numerology is: 9

Examples of revive in a Sentence

  1. Central American:

    We have to sort out our problems here, and part of the reason for the migration is the lack of jobs, the gap in wages between the United States and here, we need to work with the business community to revive the economy.

  2. Prince Ali:

    The FIFA Oversight Group ...is an essential element to revive FIFA’s reputation and restore it to what it should be – a service organization for football, having the commitment of a group of people with such impeccable credentials, unquestioned integrity and global standing represents an unprecedented response to the unprecedented crisis sweeping FIFA.

  3. Prime Minister Nguyen Xuan Phuc:

    This is a difficult decision as there are opinions to support the extension of the social distancing measures, but there are also opinions calling for the lifting of the measures to revive economic activities.

  4. Shameem Ahmed:

    August was peak season, and we had bookings up to October, it will take a long time to revive, and we don't know what will happen next.

  5. Former Vice President Joe Biden:

    I'd say we should not send you back to work until it's safe to send you back to work, this is a false choice. The way you revive the economy is you defeat the disease.

Popularity rank by frequency of use

revive#10000#23117#100000

Translations for revive

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    cause to spread or flush or flood through, over, or across
    • A. monish
    • B. descant
    • C. huff
    • D. suffuse

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