What does retire mean?

Definitions for retire
rɪˈtaɪərre·tire

This dictionary definitions page includes all the possible meanings, example usage and translations of the word retire.

Princeton's WordNet

  1. retireverb

    go into retirement; stop performing one's work or withdraw from one's position

    "He retired at age 68"

  2. retire, withdrawverb

    withdraw from active participation

    "He retired from chess"

  3. withdraw, retreat, pull away, draw back, recede, pull back, retire, move backverb

    pull back or move away or backward

    "The enemy withdrew"; "The limo pulled away from the curb"

  4. retireverb

    withdraw from circulation or from the market, as of bills, shares, and bonds

  5. adjourn, withdraw, retireverb

    break from a meeting or gathering

    "We adjourned for lunch"; "The men retired to the library"

  6. retireverb

    make (someone) retire

    "The director was retired after the scandal"

  7. retireverb

    dispose of (something no longer useful or needed)

    "She finally retired that old coat"

  8. retire, withdrawverb

    lose interest

    "he retired from life when his wife died"

  9. put out, retireverb

    cause to be out on a fielding play

  10. retire, strike outverb

    cause to get out

    "The pitcher retired three batters"; "the runner was put out at third base"

  11. go to bed, turn in, bed, crawl in, kip down, hit the hay, hit the sack, sack out, go to sleep, retireverb

    prepare for sleep

    "I usually turn in at midnight"; "He goes to bed at the crack of dawn"

Wiktionary

  1. retirenoun

    The act of retiring, or the state of being retired; also, a place to which one retires.

    His retire is by a lake.

  2. retirenoun

    A call sounded on a bugle, announcing to skirmishers that they are to retire, or fall back.

    At the retire, the cavalry fell back.

  3. retireverb

    To withdraw; to take away; -- sometimes used reflexively.

    He retired himself from the party.

  4. retireverb

    To withdraw from circulation, or from the market; to take up and pay; as, to retire bonds; to retire a note.

    The central bank retired those notes five years ago.

  5. retireverb

    To cause to retire; specifically, to designate as no longer qualified for active service; to place on the retired list; as, to retire a military or naval officer.

    The board retired the old major.

  6. retireverb

    to voluntarily stop batting before being dismissed so that the next batsman can bat

    Jones retired in favour of Smith.

  7. retireverb

    To go back or return; to draw back or away; to keep aloof; to withdraw or retreat, as from observation; to go into privacy; as, to retire to his home; to retire from the world, or from notice.

    I will retire to the study.

  8. retireverb

    To retreat from action or danger; to withdraw for safety or pleasure; as, to retire from battle.

    The regiment retired from the fray after the Major was killed.

  9. retireverb

    To withdraw from a public station, from working, or from business

  10. retireverb

    To recede; to fall or bend back; as, the shore of the sea retires in bays and gulfs.

    Past the point, the shore retires into a sequence of coves.

  11. retireverb

    To go to bed; as, he usually retires early.

    I will retire for the night.

  12. retireverb

    To stop working on a permanent basis, usually because of old age or illness.

    Having made a large fortune, he retired.

  13. retireverb

    To withdraw; to take away.

    He retired himself, his wife, and children into a forest.

  14. retireverb

    To cease use or production of something.

    The steamship made thousands of trips over several decades before it was retired by the shipping company.

  15. retireverb

    To withdraw from circulation, or from the market; to take up and pay.

    The central bank retired those notes five years ago.

  16. retireverb

    To cause to retire; specifically, to designate as no longer qualified for active service; to place on the retired list.

    The board retired the old major.

  17. retireverb

    To voluntarily stop batting before being dismissed so that the next batsman can bat.

    Jones retired in favour of Smith.

  18. retireverb

    To make a play which results in a runner or the batter being out, either by means of a put out, fly out or strikeout.

    Jones retired Smith 6-3.

  19. retireverb

    To go back or return; to withdraw or retreat, especially from public view; to go into privacy.

    I will retire to the study.

  20. retireverb

    To retreat from action or danger; to withdraw for safety or pleasure.

    to retire from battle

  21. retireverb

    To recede; to fall or bend back.

    Past the point, the shore retires into a sequence of coves.

  22. retireverb

    To go to bed.

    I will retire for the night.

  23. retireverb

    To remove or cease to use.

    When a hurricane becomes so deadly or destructive that future use would be insensitive, officials may retire the name of the hurricane.

  24. Etymology: From Middle French retirer ("draw back"), from prefix re- ("back"), + verb tirer ("draw, pull"), from Old French tirer, tirier ("to draw out, arrange, adorn"), from tire, tiere ("row, rank, order, dress") of Germanic origin akin to Old English and Old Saxon Old Saxon tīr ("fame, glory, ornament"), Old English Old English tīer ("rank, row"), Old High German ziari, zēri ("ornament"), German German Zier ("ornament, adornment"), zieren ("to adorn"). More at tier.

Samuel Johnson's Dictionary

  1. Retirenoun

    Etymology: from the verb.

    I heard his praises in pursuit,
    But ne’er, till now, his scandal of retire. William Shakespeare.

    Thou hast talk’d
    Of sallies and retires, of trenches, tents. William Shakespeare.

    The battle and the retire of the English succours were the causes of the loss of that dutchy. Francis Bacon, Henry VII.

    Eve, who unseen
    Yet all had heard, with audible lament
    Discover’d soon the place of her retire. John Milton.

  2. To Retireverb

    To withdraw; to take away.

    He brake up his court, and retired himself, his wife, and children into a forest thereby. Philip Sidney.

    They, full of rage, retired themselves into this castle. Philip Sidney.

    He, our hope, might have retir’d his power,
    And driven into despair an enemy’s hate. William Shakespeare.

    Thenoe retire me to my Milan. William Shakespeare, Tempest.

    There may be as great a variety in retiring and withdrawing men’s conceits in the world, as in obtruding them. Francis Bacon.

    As when the sun is present all the year,
    And never doth retire his golden ray,
    Needs must the spring be everlasting there,
    And every season like the month of May. Davies.

    These actions in her closet, all alone,
    Retir’d within herself, she doth fulfill. Davies.

    After some slight skirmishes, he retired himself into the castle of Farnham. Edward Hyde.

    Hydra-like, the fire
    Lifts up his hundred heads to aim his way;
    And scarce the wealthy can one half retire,
    Before he rushes in to share the prey. Dryden.

  3. To RETIREverb

    Etymology: retirer, Fr.

    The mind contracts herself, and shrinketh in,
    And to herself she gladly doth retire. Davies.

    The less I may be blest with her company, the more I will retire to God and my own heart. Charles I .

    Thou open’st wisdom’s way,
    And giv’st access, though secret she retire. John Milton.

    The parliament dissolved, and gentlemen charged to retire to their country habitations. John Hayward.

    Set up the standard towards Zion, retire, stay not. Jer.

    Set Uriah in the fore front of the hottest battle, and retire ye from him, that he may die. 2 Sam. xi. 15.

    From each hand with speed retir’d,
    Where erst was thickest th’ angelick throng. John Milton.

    He, that had driven many out of their country, perished in a strange land, retiring to the Lacedemonians. 2 Mac. v.

    The old fellow skuttled out of the room, and retired. Arb.

Wikipedia

  1. retire

    Retirement is the withdrawal from one's position or occupation or from one's active working life. A person may also semi-retire by reducing work hours or workload. Many people choose to retire when they are elderly or incapable of doing their job due to health reasons. People may also retire when they are eligible for private or public pension benefits, although some are forced to retire when bodily conditions no longer allow the person to work any longer (by illness or accident) or as a result of legislation concerning their positions. In most countries, the idea of retirement is of recent origin, being introduced during the late-nineteenth and early-twentieth centuries. Previously, low life expectancy, lack of social security and the absence of pension arrangements meant that most workers continued to work until their death. Germany was the first country to introduce retirement benefits in 1889.Nowadays, most developed countries have systems to provide pensions on retirement in old age, funded by employers or the state. In many poorer countries, there is no support for the elderly beyond that provided through the family. Today, retirement with a pension is considered a right of the worker in many societies; hard ideological, social, cultural and political battles have been fought over whether this is a right. In many Western countries, this is a right embodied in national constitutions. An increasing number of individuals are choosing to put off this point of total retirement, by selecting to exist in the emerging state of pre-tirement.

ChatGPT

  1. retire

    To retire is to voluntarily withdraw from active work or business, typically due to reaching a certain age or having sufficient resources to not need to work any longer. It is a period of one's life, often after a long-term career, where one stops engaging in full-time employment. This is commonly done as part of aging, although it can also happen due to health reasons or other personal circumstances.

Webster Dictionary

  1. Retireverb

    to withdraw; to take away; -- sometimes used reflexively

  2. Retireverb

    to withdraw from circulation, or from the market; to take up and pay; as, to retire bonds; to retire a note

  3. Retireverb

    to cause to retire; specifically, to designate as no longer qualified for active service; to place on the retired list; as, to retire a military or naval officer

  4. Retireverb

    to go back or return; to draw back or away; to keep aloof; to withdraw or retreat, as from observation; to go into privacy; as, to retire to his home; to retire from the world, or from notice

  5. Retireverb

    to retreat from action or danger; to withdraw for safety or pleasure; as, to retire from battle

  6. Retireverb

    to withdraw from a public station, or from business; as, having made a large fortune, he retired

  7. Retireverb

    to recede; to fall or bend back; as, the shore of the sea retires in bays and gulfs

  8. Retireverb

    to go to bed; as, he usually retires early

  9. Retirenoun

    the act of retiring, or the state of being retired; also, a place to which one retires

  10. Retirenoun

    a call sounded on a bugle, announcing to skirmishers that they are to retire, or fall back

  11. Etymology: [F. retirer; pref. re- re- + tirer to draw. See Tirade.]

Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

  1. Retire

    rē-tīr′, v.i. to draw back: to retreat: to recede: to go to bed.—v.t. to withdraw from circulation, as to retire a bill: to cause to retire.—n. a call sounded on a bugle: act of retiring: retreat: (obs.) a place of retreat.—n. Retī′ral, the act of taking up a bill when due.—adj. Retired′, withdrawn: secluded: private: withdrawn from business.—adv. Retired′ly.—ns. Retired′ness; Retire′ment, act of retiring or withdrawing from society or from public life, or of an army: state of being retired: solitude: privacy.—p.adj. Retir′ing, reserved: unobtrusive: retreating: modest: given to one who retires from a public office or service.—Retired list, a list of officers who are relieved from active service but receive a certain amount of pay. [O. Fr. retirerre-, back, tirer, to draw.]

Dictionary of Nautical Terms

  1. retire

    The old war-term for retreat. Thus Shakspeare makes Richard Plantagenet exclaim-- "Ne'er may he live to see a sunshine day, That cries Retire, if Warwick bid him stay."

Military Dictionary and Gazetteer

  1. retire

    Signifies to fall back a short distance. Also, a bugle-sound intimating to skirmishers that they are to fall back. This bugle-sound in the U. S. service is termed “to the rear.”

British National Corpus

  1. Written Corpus Frequency

    Rank popularity for the word 'retire' in Written Corpus Frequency: #4634

  2. Verbs Frequency

    Rank popularity for the word 'retire' in Verbs Frequency: #512

Anagrams for retire »

  1. Terrie

  2. tierer

  3. errite

  4. reiter

  5. retier

How to pronounce retire?

How to say retire in sign language?

Numerology

  1. Chaldean Numerology

    The numerical value of retire in Chaldean Numerology is: 1

  2. Pythagorean Numerology

    The numerical value of retire in Pythagorean Numerology is: 3

Examples of retire in a Sentence

  1. Mary Frances O'Donnell:

    While the decision to retire is a personal one and can be attributed to a range of factors, it is a troubling trend that we are closely monitoring.

  2. Guy Eakin:

    The cost of care is dramatically outpacing what the country is putting into research, arthritis can rob people of their lives, and as a leading cause of disability, it is why people retire and go into assisted living, and it's a dramatic cost to our national economy. We can't fix health care if we can't fix arthritis.

  3. Michael Bivona:

    People don't realize that if they began working in their twenties and retire at age sixty that they may spend as much time in retirement as they did working.

  4. Renaud Foucart:

    Government agencies predict massive deficits in the coming years, as boomers continue to retire, and they need to make changes very quickly otherwise they will lose money to invest in other things.

  5. Justice Minister Heiko Maas:

    Therefore I decided in agreement with the chancellery that I will ask the president to retire him.

Popularity rank by frequency of use

retire#10000#12529#100000

Translations for retire

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"retire." Definitions.net. STANDS4 LLC, 2024. Web. 22 Apr. 2024. <https://www.definitions.net/definition/retire>.

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