What does poetry mean?

Definitions for poetry
ˈpoʊ ɪ tripo·et·ry

Here are all the possible meanings and translations of the word poetry.

Princeton's WordNet

  1. poetry, poesy, versenoun

    literature in metrical form

  2. poetrynoun

    any communication resembling poetry in beauty or the evocation of feeling

Wiktionary

  1. poetrynoun

    The class of literature comprising poems.

  2. poetrynoun

    Composition in verse or language exhibiting conscious attention to patterns.

  3. poetrynoun

    A poet's literary production

  4. poetrynoun

    A 'poetical' quality, artistic and/or artfull, which appeals or stirs the imagination, in any medium

    That 'Swan Lake' choreography is poetry in motion, fitting the musical poetry of Tchaikovski's divine score well beyond the literary inspiration

  5. Etymology: From ποίησις, from ποιέω.

Wikipedia

  1. Poetry

    Poetry (derived from the Greek poiesis, "making") is a form of literature that uses aesthetic and rhythmic qualities of language—such as phonaesthetics, sound symbolism, and metre—to evoke meanings in addition to, or in place of, the prosaic ostensible meaning. Poetry has a long history dating back to prehistoric times with hunting poetry in Africa, and to panegyric and elegiac court poetry of the empires of the Nile, Niger, and Volta River valleys. Some of the earliest written poetry in Africa is found among the Pyramid Texts written during the 25th century BCE. The earliest Western Asian epic poetry, the Epic of Gilgamesh, was written in Sumerian. Early poems in the Eurasian continent evolved from folk songs such as the Chinese Shijing; or from a need to retell oral epics, as with the Sanskrit Vedas, the Zoroastrian Gathas, and the Homeric epics, the Iliad and the Odyssey. Ancient Greek attempts to define poetry, such as Aristotle's Poetics, focused on the uses of speech in rhetoric, drama, song, and comedy. Later attempts concentrated on features such as repetition, verse form, and rhyme, and emphasized the aesthetics which distinguish poetry from more objectively-informative prosaic writing. Poetry uses forms and conventions to suggest differential interpretation to words, or to evoke emotive responses. Devices such as assonance, alliteration, onomatopoeia, and rhythm are sometimes used to achieve musical or incantatory effects. The use of ambiguity, symbolism, irony, and other stylistic elements of poetic diction often leaves a poem open to multiple interpretations. Similarly, figures of speech such as metaphor, simile, and metonymy create a resonance between otherwise disparate images—a layering of meanings, forming connections previously not perceived. Kindred forms of resonance may exist, between individual verses, in their patterns of rhyme or rhythm. Some poetry types are specific to particular cultures and genres and respond to characteristics of the language in which the poet writes. Readers accustomed to identifying poetry with Dante, Goethe, Mickiewicz, or Rumi may think of it as written in lines based on rhyme and regular meter. There are, however, traditions, such as Biblical poetry, that use other means to create rhythm and euphony. Much modern poetry reflects a critique of poetic tradition, testing the principle of euphony itself or altogether forgoing rhyme or set rhythm. In today's increasingly globalized world, poets often adapt forms, styles, and techniques from diverse cultures and languages.

Webster Dictionary

  1. Poetrynoun

    the art of apprehending and interpreting ideas by the faculty of imagination; the art of idealizing in thought and in expression

  2. Poetrynoun

    imaginative language or composition, whether expressed rhythmically or in prose. Specifically: Metrical composition; verse; rhyme; poems collectively; as, heroic poetry; dramatic poetry; lyric or Pindaric poetry

  3. Etymology: [OF. poeterie. See Poet.]

Freebase

  1. Poetry

    Poetry is a form of literary art which uses aesthetic and rhythmic qualities of language—such as phonaesthetics, sound symbolism, and metre—to evoke meanings in addition to, or in place of, the prosaic ostensible meaning. Poetry has a long history, dating back to the Sumerian Epic of Gilgamesh. Early poems evolved from folk songs such as the Chinese Shijing, or from a need to retell oral epics, as with the Sanskrit Vedas, Zoroastrian Gathas, and the Homeric epics, the Iliad and the Odyssey. Ancient attempts to define poetry, such as Aristotle's Poetics, focused on the uses of speech in rhetoric, drama, song and comedy. Later attempts concentrated on features such as repetition, verse form and rhyme, and emphasized the aesthetics which distinguish poetry from more objectively-informative, prosaic forms of writing. From the mid-20th century, poetry has sometimes been more generally regarded as a fundamental creative act employing language. Poetry uses forms and conventions to suggest differential interpretation to words, or to evoke emotive responses. Devices such as assonance, alliteration, onomatopoeia and rhythm are sometimes used to achieve musical or incantatory effects. The use of ambiguity, symbolism, irony and other stylistic elements of poetic diction often leaves a poem open to multiple interpretations. Similarly, metaphor, simile and metonymy create a resonance between otherwise disparate images—a layering of meanings, forming connections previously not perceived. Kindred forms of resonance may exist, between individual verses, in their patterns of rhyme or rhythm.

The Nuttall Encyclopedia

  1. Poetry

    the gift of penetrating into the inner soul or secret of a thing, and bodying it forth rhythmically so as to captivate the imagination and the heart.

The Roycroft Dictionary

  1. poetry

    1. A substitute for the impossible. 2. The bill and coo of sex.

U.S. National Library of Medicine

  1. Poetry

    Works that consist of literary and oral genre expressing meaning via symbolism and following formal or informal patterns.

Suggested Resources

  1. poetry

    Poetry Forms -- Read about the various poetry forms and types including definitions and examples.

Matched Categories

British National Corpus

  1. Spoken Corpus Frequency

    Rank popularity for the word 'poetry' in Spoken Corpus Frequency: #3294

  2. Nouns Frequency

    Rank popularity for the word 'poetry' in Nouns Frequency: #1409

How to pronounce poetry?

How to say poetry in sign language?

Numerology

  1. Chaldean Numerology

    The numerical value of poetry in Chaldean Numerology is: 9

  2. Pythagorean Numerology

    The numerical value of poetry in Pythagorean Numerology is: 9

Examples of poetry in a Sentence

  1. Musin Almat Zhumabekovich:

    1. Love for money Modern love for money. If you have no money or little money for a girl. Neither the size of the penis, nor the size of the muscles, nor the size of the intellect, nor even your humor will save you. She will just start to sober up from your charm and charm that you are just a loser. If you are loved only because of money, then you are out of luck with your face. 2. Lying is the daughter of greed The evolutionary ladder of lies, lies - this is a jetpack in the ladder of social status, and people seem so small it gives rise to misanthropy and sociopathy. Honest people are homeless people or corpses. In the evolution of monopoly by self-interest and profit, only the manipulative lies of populism and marketing, the acting of hypocritical greed, are being improved. Lying is the daughter of greed. Lies turn us into atheists, immerse in skepticism all the brightest and most beautiful. 3.subconscious and love Libido confuses us, while the subconscious forms platonic love that affects intuition. Subconsciously, we had to come to our soul mate, if it is in the brain program. The subconscious is a life scenario programmed by the influence of karma. 4. Revenge is a gift from karma Revenge is a gift from karma so that you cannot get out of the hands of karma, its vicious circle. This is an eloquent self-irony in which it is shown that you are no better than the enemy. 5. Poetry is very beautiful porn. 6. In poetry, testosterone is the brush of catharsis, and libido is the ink of inspiration. 7. Humor is angry honesty, like an eruption of truth, a volcano on which it is written: enough. 8. Kazakh Woman Powerful libido generator You excite the imagination, you are the whole inner world. You boil my hormones in my pants. The whole body is like a continuous powerful erection. Powerful libido generator. You are mania and filia and fetish. Author: Musin Almat Zhumabekovich

  2. Charlie Chaplin:

    Why should poetry have to make sense?

  3. Socrates, In "Apology," sct. 21, by Plato.:

    I decided that it was not wisdom that enabled [poets] to write their poetry, but a kind of instinct or inspiration, such as you find in seers and prophets who deliver all their sublime messages without knowing in the least what they mean.

  4. George Farquhar:

    Poetry is a mere drug, Sir.

  5. Musin Almat Zhumabekovich:

    Too much truth is the style of a drunken master, intoxicated with the sweet wine of philosophical poetry, a comical third eye, whose power of thought will break stone and ice. Developed dexterity of thought, manipulates the fighting techniques of aphorisms leaving no chance. Loneliness enhances the force of the blow, its depth of thought, piercing consciousness and subconsciousness.

Popularity rank by frequency of use

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Translations for poetry

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    relating to or involving money
    • A. pecuniary
    • B. flabby
    • C. numinous
    • D. irascible

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