What does piano mean?

Definitions for piano
piˈɑ noʊ, ˈpyɑ-pi·ano

Here are all the possible meanings and translations of the word piano.

Princeton's WordNet

  1. piano, pianoforte, forte-pianonoun

    a keyboard instrument that is played by depressing keys that cause hammers to strike tuned strings and produce sounds

  2. piano, pianissimoadjective

    (music) low loudness

  3. piano, softadverb

    used chiefly as a direction or description in music

    "the piano passages in the composition"

  4. piano, softlyadverb

    used as a direction in music; to be played relatively softly

Wiktionary

  1. pianonoun

    A keyboard musical instrument, usually ranging over seven octaves, with white and black keys, played by pressing these keys, causing hammers to strike strings.

    Etymology: Short form of pianoforte, from piano + forte. So named because older keyboard instruments, notably the harpsichord and the clavier, could not produce varied volumes.

  2. pianoadjective

    Soft. Used as a dynamic directive in sheet music in its abbreviated form, {p.}, to indicate lowering the volume of the music. In the pianoforte this is done by pressing the instrument's keys more lightly.

    Etymology: Short form of pianoforte, from piano + forte. So named because older keyboard instruments, notably the harpsichord and the clavier, could not produce varied volumes.

Wikipedia

  1. Piano

    The piano is an acoustic, stringed musical instrument invented in Italy by Bartolomeo Cristofori around the year 1700 (the exact year is uncertain), in which the strings are struck by hammers. It is played using a keyboard, which is a row of keys (small levers) that the performer presses down or strikes with the fingers and thumbs of both hands to cause the hammers to strike the strings. The word piano is a shortened form of pianoforte, the Italian term for the early 1700s versions of the instrument, which in turn derives from gravicembalo col piano e forte and fortepiano. The Italian musical terms piano and forte indicate "soft" and "loud" respectively, in this context referring to the variations in volume (i.e., loudness) produced in response to a pianist's touch or pressure on the keys: the greater the velocity of a key press, the greater the force of the hammer hitting the strings, and the louder the sound of the note produced and the stronger the attack. The name was created as a contrast to harpsichord, a musical instrument that does not allow variation in volume; compared to the harpsichord, the first fortepianos in the 1700s had a quieter sound and smaller dynamic range.An acoustic piano usually has a protective wooden case surrounding the soundboard and metal strings, which are strung under great tension on a heavy metal frame. Pressing one or more keys on the piano's keyboard causes a padded hammer (typically padded with firm felt) to strike the strings. The hammer rebounds from the strings, and the strings continue to vibrate at their resonant frequency. These vibrations are transmitted through a bridge to a soundboard that amplifies by more efficiently coupling the acoustic energy to the air. When the key is released, a damper stops the strings' vibration, ending the sound. Notes can be sustained, even when the keys are released by the fingers and thumbs, by the use of pedals at the base of the instrument. The sustain pedal enables pianists to play musical passages that would otherwise be impossible, such as sounding a 10-note chord in the lower register and then, while this chord is being continued with the sustain pedal, shifting both hands to the treble range to play a melody and arpeggios over the top of this sustained chord. Unlike the pipe organ and harpsichord, two major keyboard instruments widely used before the piano, the piano allows gradations of volume and tone according to how forcefully a performer presses or strikes the keys. Most modern pianos have a row of 88 black and white keys, 52 white keys for the notes of the C major scale (C, D, E, F, G, A and B) and 36 shorter black keys, which are raised above the white keys, and set further back on the keyboard. This means that the piano can play 88 different pitches (or "notes"), going from the deepest bass range to the highest treble. The black keys are for the "accidentals" (F♯/G♭, G♯/A♭, A♯/B♭, C♯/D♭, and D♯/E♭), which are needed to play in all twelve keys. More rarely, some pianos have additional keys (which require additional strings). Most notes have three strings, except for the bass, which graduates from one to two. The strings are sounded when keys are pressed or struck, and silenced by dampers when the hands are lifted from the keyboard. Although an acoustic piano has strings, it is usually classified as a percussion instrument rather than as a stringed instrument, because the strings are struck rather than plucked (as with a harpsichord or spinet); in the Hornbostel–Sachs system of instrument classification, pianos are considered chordophones. There are two main types of piano: the grand piano and the upright piano. The grand piano is used for Classical solos, chamber music, and art song, and it is often used in jazz and pop concerts. The upright piano, which is more compact, is the most popular type, as it is a better size for use in private homes for domestic music-making and practice. During the 1800s, influenced by the musical trends of the Romantic music era, innovations such as the cast iron frame (which allowed much greater string tensions) and aliquot stringing gave grand pianos a more powerful sound, with a longer sustain and richer tone. In the nineteenth century, a family's piano played the same role that a radio or phonograph played in the twentieth century; when a nineteenth-century family wanted to hear a newly published musical piece or symphony, they could hear it by having a family member play it on the piano. During the nineteenth century, music publishers produced many musical works in arrangements for piano, so that music lovers could play and hear the popular pieces of the day in their home. The piano is widely employed in classical, jazz, traditional and popular music for solo and ensemble performances, accompaniment, and for composing, songwriting and rehearsals. Although the piano is very heavy and thus not portable and is expensive (in comparison with other widely used accompaniment instruments, su

Webster Dictionary

  1. Piano

    soft; -- a direction to the performer to execute a certain passage softly, and with diminished volume of tone. (Abbrev. p.)

    Etymology: [It., even, smooth, soft, fr. L. planus even, level.]

  2. Pianoadjective

    alt. of Pianoforte

    Etymology: [It., even, smooth, soft, fr. L. planus even, level.]

Freebase

  1. Piano

    The piano is a musical instrument played by means of a keyboard. Widely used in classical and jazz music for solo performances, ensemble use, chamber music and accompaniment, the piano is also popular as a tool for composing and rehearsal. Although not portable and often expensive, the piano's versatility and ubiquity have made it one of the world's most familiar musical instruments. Pressing a key on the piano's keyboard causes a padded hammer to strike steel strings. The hammers rebound, and the strings continue to vibrate at their resonant frequency. These vibrations are transmitted through a bridge to a sounding board that more efficiently couples the acoustic energy to the air. The sound would otherwise be no louder than that directly produced by the strings. When the key is released, a damper stops the string's vibration and the sound. See the article on Piano key frequencies for a picture of the piano keyboard and the location of middle-C. In the Hornbostel-Sachs system of instrument classification, pianos are considered chordophones. The word piano is a shortened form of pianoforte, the Italian word for the instrument. The musical terms piano and forte mean "quiet" and "loud", respectively, and in this context refer to variations in loudness the instrument produces in response to a pianist's touch on the keys: the greater the velocity of a key press, the greater the force of the hammer hitting the string, and the louder the note produced. The word forte in Italian actually means force or strong.

The Foolish Dictionary, by Gideon Wurdz

  1. PIANO

    A tool frequently used in building a Rough House.

British National Corpus

  1. Spoken Corpus Frequency

    Rank popularity for the word 'piano' in Spoken Corpus Frequency: #4725

  2. Written Corpus Frequency

    Rank popularity for the word 'piano' in Written Corpus Frequency: #3710

  3. Nouns Frequency

    Rank popularity for the word 'piano' in Nouns Frequency: #1777

How to pronounce piano?

  1. Alex
    US English
    Daniel
    British
    Karen
    Australian
    Veena
    Indian

How to say piano in sign language?

Numerology

  1. Chaldean Numerology

    The numerical value of piano in Chaldean Numerology is: 4

  2. Pythagorean Numerology

    The numerical value of piano in Pythagorean Numerology is: 1

Examples of piano in a Sentence

  1. Ellen DeGeneres:

    Sound check was great. It went really well. I was really excited, during changeover and the ad break, the microphones fell onto the piano strings, which is what the guitar noise was – some people thought it was [ Justin ] Bieber rehearsing but it wasn't him. We’re on great terms, Ellen DeGeneres said. And it just kind of put the whole thing off, really. Ellen DeGeneres knew Ellen DeGeneres performance was not going well, Ellen DeGeneres said.

  2. Ryan Gosling:

    Id like to try and thank one person properly, and to say that while I was singing and dancing and playing piano and having one of the best experiences Ive ever had on a film, my lady was raising Amada Lee, pregnant with our second, and trying to help her brother fight his battle with cancer.

  3. Vladimir Berezhnoy:

    He looked for his brother, tried to find anything that belonged to him. He came to our office, played piano. He was not angry.

  4. Eddie Spearman:

    It got the piano and organ and all of that stuff, im lost. I dont know what to do until all the water goes down.

  5. Musin Almat Zhumabekovich:

    Laughing evil, schizophrenia on the piano, you are like a bird in a cage that thinks it flies. You smile with hatred, realizing that between people there is only selfishness and hypocrisy.

Images & Illustrations of piano

  1. pianopianopianopianopiano

Popularity rank by frequency of use

piano#1#3763#10000

Translations for piano

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    a sophisticated person who has travelled in many countries
    • A. cosmopolitan
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