What does piano mean?

Definitions for piano
piˈɑ noʊ, ˈpyɑ-pi·ano

Here are all the possible meanings and translations of the word piano.

Princeton's WordNet

  1. piano, pianoforte, forte-piano(noun)

    a keyboard instrument that is played by depressing keys that cause hammers to strike tuned strings and produce sounds

  2. piano, pianissimo(adj)

    (music) low loudness

  3. piano, soft(adverb)

    used chiefly as a direction or description in music

    "the piano passages in the composition"

  4. piano, softly(adverb)

    used as a direction in music; to be played relatively softly

Wiktionary

  1. piano(Noun)

    A keyboard musical instrument, usually ranging over seven octaves, with white and black keys, played by pressing these keys, causing hammers to strike strings.

    Etymology: Short form of pianoforte, from piano + forte. So named because older keyboard instruments, notably the harpsichord and the clavier, could not produce varied volumes.

  2. piano(Adjective)

    Soft. Used as a dynamic directive in sheet music in its abbreviated form, {p.}, to indicate lowering the volume of the music. In the pianoforte this is done by pressing the instrument's keys more lightly.

    Etymology: Short form of pianoforte, from piano + forte. So named because older keyboard instruments, notably the harpsichord and the clavier, could not produce varied volumes.

Wikipedia

  1. Piano

    The piano is an acoustic, stringed musical instrument invented in Italy by Bartolomeo Cristofori around the year 1700 (the exact year is uncertain), in which the strings are struck by hammers. It is played using a keyboard, which is a row of keys (small levers) that the performer presses down or strikes with the fingers and thumbs of both hands to cause the hammers to strike the strings. The word piano is a shortened form of pianoforte, the Italian term for the early 1700s versions of the instrument, which in turn derives from gravicembalo col piano e forte and fortepiano. The Italian musical terms piano and forte indicate "soft" and "loud" respectively, in this context referring to the variations in volume (i.e., loudness) produced in response to a pianist's touch or pressure on the keys: the greater the velocity of a key press, the greater the force of the hammer hitting the strings, and the louder the sound of the note produced and the stronger the attack. The name was created as a contrast to harpsichord, a musical instrument that does not allow variation in volume; compared to the harpsichord, the first fortepianos in the 1700s had a quieter sound and smaller dynamic range.An acoustic piano usually has a protective wooden case surrounding the soundboard and metal strings, which are strung under great tension on a heavy metal frame. Pressing one or more keys on the piano's keyboard causes a padded hammer (typically padded with firm felt) to strike the strings. The hammer rebounds from the strings, and the strings continue to vibrate at their resonant frequency. These vibrations are transmitted through a bridge to a soundboard that amplifies by more efficiently coupling the acoustic energy to the air. When the key is released, a damper stops the strings' vibration, ending the sound. Notes can be sustained, even when the keys are released by the fingers and thumbs, by the use of pedals at the base of the instrument. The sustain pedal enables pianists to play musical passages that would otherwise be impossible, such as sounding a 10-note chord in the lower register and then, while this chord is being continued with the sustain pedal, shifting both hands to the treble range to play a melody and arpeggios over the top of this sustained chord. Unlike the pipe organ and harpsichord, two major keyboard instruments widely used before the piano, the piano allows gradations of volume and tone according to how forcefully a performer presses or strikes the keys. Most modern pianos have a row of 88 black and white keys, 52 white keys for the notes of the C major scale (C, D, E, F, G, A and B) and 36 shorter black keys, which are raised above the white keys, and set further back on the keyboard. This means that the piano can play 88 different pitches (or "notes"), going from the deepest bass range to the highest treble. The black keys are for the "accidentals" (F♯/G♭, G♯/A♭, A♯/B♭, C♯/D♭, and D♯/E♭), which are needed to play in all twelve keys. More rarely, some pianos have additional keys (which require additional strings). Most notes have three strings, except for the bass, which graduates from one to two. The strings are sounded when keys are pressed or struck, and silenced by dampers when the hands are lifted from the keyboard. Although an acoustic piano has strings, it is usually classified as a percussion instrument rather than as a stringed instrument, because the strings are struck rather than plucked (as with a harpsichord or spinet); in the Hornbostel–Sachs system of instrument classification, pianos are considered chordophones. There are two main types of piano: the grand piano and the upright piano. The grand piano is used for Classical solos, chamber music, and art song, and it is often used in jazz and pop concerts. The upright piano, which is more compact, is the most popular type, as it is a better size for use in private homes for domestic music-making and practice. During the 1800s, influenced by the musical trends of the Romantic music era, innovations such as the cast iron frame (which allowed much greater string tensions) and aliquot stringing gave grand pianos a more powerful sound, with a longer sustain and richer tone. In the nineteenth century, a family's piano played the same role that a radio or phonograph played in the twentieth century; when a nineteenth-century family wanted to hear a newly published musical piece or symphony, they could hear it by having a family member play it on the piano. During the nineteenth century, music publishers produced many musical works in arrangements for piano, so that music lovers could play and hear the popular pieces of the day in their home. The piano is widely employed in classical, jazz, traditional and popular music for solo and ensemble performances, accompaniment, and for composing, songwriting and rehearsals. Although the piano is very heavy and thus not portable and is expensive (in comparison with other widely used accompaniment instruments, su

Webster Dictionary

  1. Piano

    soft; -- a direction to the performer to execute a certain passage softly, and with diminished volume of tone. (Abbrev. p.)

    Etymology: [It., even, smooth, soft, fr. L. planus even, level.]

  2. Piano(adj)

    alt. of Pianoforte

    Etymology: [It., even, smooth, soft, fr. L. planus even, level.]

Freebase

  1. Piano

    The piano is a musical instrument played by means of a keyboard. Widely used in classical and jazz music for solo performances, ensemble use, chamber music and accompaniment, the piano is also popular as a tool for composing and rehearsal. Although not portable and often expensive, the piano's versatility and ubiquity have made it one of the world's most familiar musical instruments. Pressing a key on the piano's keyboard causes a padded hammer to strike steel strings. The hammers rebound, and the strings continue to vibrate at their resonant frequency. These vibrations are transmitted through a bridge to a sounding board that more efficiently couples the acoustic energy to the air. The sound would otherwise be no louder than that directly produced by the strings. When the key is released, a damper stops the string's vibration and the sound. See the article on Piano key frequencies for a picture of the piano keyboard and the location of middle-C. In the Hornbostel-Sachs system of instrument classification, pianos are considered chordophones. The word piano is a shortened form of pianoforte, the Italian word for the instrument. The musical terms piano and forte mean "quiet" and "loud", respectively, and in this context refer to variations in loudness the instrument produces in response to a pianist's touch on the keys: the greater the velocity of a key press, the greater the force of the hammer hitting the string, and the louder the note produced. The word forte in Italian actually means force or strong.

The Foolish Dictionary, by Gideon Wurdz

  1. PIANO

    A tool frequently used in building a Rough House.

British National Corpus

  1. Spoken Corpus Frequency

    Rank popularity for the word 'piano' in Spoken Corpus Frequency: #4725

  2. Written Corpus Frequency

    Rank popularity for the word 'piano' in Written Corpus Frequency: #3710

  3. Nouns Frequency

    Rank popularity for the word 'piano' in Nouns Frequency: #1777

How to pronounce piano?

  1. Alex
    Alex
    US English
    Daniel
    Daniel
    British
    Karen
    Karen
    Australian
    Veena
    Veena
    Indian

How to say piano in sign language?

  1. piano

Numerology

  1. Chaldean Numerology

    The numerical value of piano in Chaldean Numerology is: 4

  2. Pythagorean Numerology

    The numerical value of piano in Pythagorean Numerology is: 1

Examples of piano in a Sentence

  1. Musin Almat Zhumabekovich:

    1. Seeing you finally smile at the emptiness, indelible smile on your face. And your terrible laugh in response to any blows and fear that fate grants. She feels powerless over you. You feel the complete absence of fear - this is the acceptance of reality in its true form. 2. The people who created and develop this world: in debt. Sins are debts after death. Sins as a loan taken from a bank of hell. 3. Truth plunges into loneliness. 4. Fate lowered the gun fuse - this is the best lie detector in the world. Take a look at your body, you are only one millimeter away from eternity, her finger on the trigger. Because of problems, your whole life will pass in one second; you will be separated from immortality by only one second. The closer you are to death, the closer you are to the truth that everything in the human world is meaningless because it is temporary. 5. A halo of knowledge within life, this is a record of projection, a person who feels reality can feel the universe: the past, present and future, and that which is timeless. 6. On the tombstone of a woman who died alone, because she always rejected, repelled, did not forgive, and broke the hearts of all the guys and men who had once offered themselves to her. Her last words were written on her stone: I have been waiting for the perfect man all my life. 7. Some harden life, while others only spoil. 8. Reality is decomposing and all the ridiculous horrors of reality are visible, since you are in the violent chronosphere, where the quantum genetic transformations of the instincts of despair are in, in the projection of an alternative reality of the ego of power in which everything is programmed for decomposition. 9. The knowledge of world religions is only four keys to a higher form of awareness, they will open the gates to higher worlds; you just need to choose one of these keys in order to evolve. 10. Philosophical poetry Noir jazz saxophone of loneliness in poetic comics of memories, with light eroticism of romance. All filled with philosophical silence and self-talk. An almost finished cigarette, it goes like a thought to the logical conclusion of philosophical poetry, where you are looking for a way out of the prison of reality. You play poker with the fate of someone luck, and someone pass. It rains from sinful tears; it does not make the city more conscientious, but a little cleaner. The city is in a fog of thought, the red lightnings of anger sparkle, in the black clouds of depression and then the cold snow of indifference illuminated by the lifeless light of the curiosity of the gods. Soon a new dawn of thoughts, the black and white reality of pessimism, where in the bright colors of the expressive contrasts of the oppositions, there is only a faint light of conscience and animal instincts of darkness. Throughout the deep darkness suggests that the other world is very close and the door there is always open. Everywhere the harsh gray color of thought, periodically sound melodies of the void of truth. Everything is gray here and only red blood is the color of eternal guilt. Everything can become colored only from self-hypnosis in the bright colors of the illusions of optimism. Reason plunges into the darkness of Gothic despair and only a beloved woman can get out of there. The heart accumulates scars, but it does not stop, it continues to live for the sake of loved ones, for the sake of curiosity. In this cold void of the illusions of materialism, only true love will warm the soul, but not lust, because after an orgasm you feel sad notes of loneliness, filled on the piano of sadness. Lust is the girlfriend of egoism, which is the six of self-deception. Vivid memories are a consolation prize of eternity, unlike life they are eternal - these are prosaic scenes of cinema of karma. Scenes of comedians about heroes and villains, where you were exposed as an antihero, and your tormentors were victims. Here you feel literally every frame of sadism of fate. 11. From cruel blows of reality, a person does not become prettier. 12. From disappointment, the soul cannot stop laughing with a frightening rampant laugh, between fear and rampant angry laughter. The smiling, insanely laughing psyche growls and tears to pieces from the high-voltage psychic tension that gives birth to truth, from a smile the philosophy of the psyche breaks into two parts of the duality of the world. A huge smile is visible in the broken mirror of the psyche, and only sometimes the image of a person is reflected in them as a reflection of conscience. Author: Musin Almat Zhumabekovich

  2. Evgeni Kostitsyn:

    Piano performances by Condoleezza Rice are better than Hitler's paintings.

  3. Zahraa Awad:

    I remember all the names, they represented the cosmopolitan atmospheres of Alexandria, and in the evening when there's not much cars, you can always hear the piano coming out of the music school of the Conservatoire.

  4. Dave Clark:

    It( became) a mega-production, which I was happy with and Freddie loved. But I didn't think about what we had originally done until a decade or so later, when I thought,' I've never felt that sort of goosebumps feeling that I got on that original run-through at Abbey Road with just Freddie and piano.

  5. Jamaican Monty Alexander:

    Forty years ago I was playing piano in this casino .... I'm very happy to be playing for you tonight.

Images & Illustrations of piano

  1. pianopianopianopianopiano

Popularity rank by frequency of use

piano#1#3763#10000

Translations for piano

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