What does philology mean?

Definitions for philology
fɪˈlɒl ə dʒiphilol·o·gy

This dictionary definitions page includes all the possible meanings, example usage and translations of the word philology.

Princeton's WordNet

  1. linguistics, philologynoun

    the humanistic study of language and literature

Wiktionary

  1. philologynoun

    The humanistic study of historical linguistics.

  2. Etymology: First coined 1614, from philologie, from φιλολογία, from φίλος + λόγος.

Samuel Johnson's Dictionary

  1. PHILOLOGYnoun

    Criticism; grammatical learning.

    Etymology: φιλολογία; philologie, Fr.

    Temper all discourses of philology with interspersions of morality. William Walker.

Wikipedia

  1. Philology

    Philology (from Ancient Greek φιλολογία (philología) 'love of word') is the study of language in oral and written historical sources; it is the intersection of textual criticism, literary criticism, history, and linguistics (with especially strong ties to etymology). Philology is also defined as the study of literary texts as well as oral and written records, the establishment of their authenticity and their original form, and the determination of their meaning. A person who pursues this kind of study is known as a philologist. In older usage, especially British, philology is more general, covering comparative and historical linguistics.Classical philology studies classical languages. Classical philology principally originated from the Library of Pergamum and the Library of Alexandria around the fourth century BC, continued by Greeks and Romans throughout the Roman/Byzantine Empire. It was eventually resumed by European scholars of the Renaissance, where it was soon joined by philologies of other European (Germanic, Celtic), Eurasian (Slavistics, etc.), Asian (Arabic, Persian, Sanskrit, Chinese, etc.), and African (Egyptian, Nubian, etc.) languages. Indo-European studies involve the comparative philology of all Indo-European languages. Philology, with its focus on historical development (diachronic analysis), is contrasted with linguistics due to Ferdinand de Saussure's insistence on the importance of synchronic analysis. While the contrast continued with the emergence of structuralism and the emphasis of Noam Chomsky on syntax, research in historical linguistics often relies on philological materials and findings.

ChatGPT

  1. philology

    Philology is the study of language in written historical sources; it is a combination of literary studies, history and linguistics. This academic discipline is dedicated to the analysis of language and the literature produced by a specific culture, its historical context, and how it has evolved over time. It can also include the study of classical languages such as Greek, Latin, Sanskrit, or classical Chinese, and their historical linguistics.

Webster Dictionary

  1. Philologynoun

    criticism; grammatical learning

  2. Philologynoun

    the study of language, especially in a philosophical manner and as a science; the investigation of the laws of human speech, the relation of different tongues to one another, and historical development of languages; linguistic science

  3. Philologynoun

    a treatise on the science of language

  4. Etymology: [L. philologia love of learning, interpretation, philology, Gr. filologi`a: cf. F. philologie. See Philologer.]

Wikidata

  1. Philology

    Philology is the study of language in written historical sources; it is a combination of literary studies, history, and linguistics. It is more commonly defined as the study of literary texts and written records, the establishment of their authenticity and their original form, and the determination of their meaning. Classical philology is the philology of Greek and Classical Latin. Classical philology is historically primary, originating in Pergamum and Alexandria around the 4th century BC, continued by Greeks and Romans throughout the Roman and Byzantine Empires, and eventually taken up by European scholars of the Renaissance, where it was soon joined by philologies of other languages both European and non-European. Indo-European studies involves the comparative philology of all Indo-European languages. Any classical language can be studied philologically, and indeed describing a language as "classical" is to imply the existence of a philological tradition associated with it. Because of its focus on historical development, philology came to be used as a term contrasting with linguistics. This is due to a 20th-century development triggered by Ferdinand de Saussure's insistence on the importance of synchronic analysis, and the later emergence of structuralism and Chomskyan linguistics with its emphasis on syntax.

Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

  1. Philology

    fi-lol′ō-ji, n. the science of language: the study of etymology, grammar, rhetoric, and literary criticism: (orig.) the knowledge which enabled men to study and explain the classical languages of Greece and Rome.—ns. Philol′oger, Philolō′gian, Philol′ogist, Phil′ologue, one versed in philology.—adjs. Philolog′ic, -al.—adv. Philolog′ically.—Comparative philology, study of languages by comparing their history, forms, and relationships with each other. [L.,—Gr. philologiaphilologos, fond of words—philos, loving, logos, discourse.]

U.S. National Library of Medicine

  1. Philology

    The study of literature in its widest sense, including grammar, etymology, criticism, literary history, language history, linguistic history, systems of writing, and anything else that is relevant to literature or language viewed as literature. Philology as a discipline has both philosophical and scientific overtones.

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Numerology

  1. Chaldean Numerology

    The numerical value of philology in Chaldean Numerology is: 2

  2. Pythagorean Numerology

    The numerical value of philology in Pythagorean Numerology is: 2

Examples of philology in a Sentence

  1. Della Zana:

    This was done with the latest scientific techniques and scholarly standards of philology, so previous errors have been corrected.

  2. Della Zana:

    The last 'diplomatic transcription' of the will is 150 years old, this was done with the latest scientific techniques and scholarly standards of philology, so previous errors have been corrected.

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"philology." Definitions.net. STANDS4 LLC, 2024. Web. 29 May 2024. <https://www.definitions.net/definition/philology>.

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