What does pet mean?

Definitions for pet
pɛtpet

Here are all the possible meanings and translations of the word pet.

Princeton's WordNet

  1. pet(noun)

    a domesticated animal kept for companionship or amusement

  2. darling, favorite, favourite, pet, dearie, deary, ducky(noun)

    a special loved one

  3. pet(noun)

    a fit of petulance or sulkiness (especially at what is felt to be a slight)

  4. positron emission tomography, PET(adj)

    using a computerized radiographic technique to examine the metabolic activity in various tissues (especially in the brain)

  5. favored, favorite(a), favourite(a), best-loved, pet, preferred, preferent(verb)

    preferred above all others and treated with partiality

    "the favored child"

  6. pet(verb)

    stroke or caress gently

    "pet the lamb"

  7. pet(verb)

    stroke or caress in an erotic manner, as during lovemaking

GCIDE

  1. pet(n.)

    Any animal kept as a companion, usually in or around one's home, typically domesticated and cared for attentively and often affectionately. Distinguished from animals raised for food or to perform useful tasks, as a draft animal or a farm animal.

    Etymology: [Formerly peat, perhaps from Ir. peat, akin to Gael. peata.]

Wikipedia

  1. Pet

    A pet, or companion animal, is an animal kept primarily for a person's company or entertainment rather than as a working animal, livestock or a laboratory animal. Popular pets are often considered to have attractive appearances, intelligence and relatable personalities, but some pets may be taken in on an altruistic basis (such as a stray animal) and accepted by the owner regardless of these characteristics. Two of the most popular pets are dogs and cats; the technical term for a cat lover is an ailurophile and a dog lover a cynophile. Other animals commonly kept include: rabbits; ferrets; pigs; rodents, such as gerbils, hamsters, chinchillas, rats, mice, and guinea pigs; avian pets, such as parrots, passerines and fowls; reptile pets, such as turtles, alligators, crocodiles, lizards, and snakes; aquatic pets, such as fish, freshwater and saltwater snails, amphibians like frogs and salamanders; and arthropod pets, such as tarantulas and hermit crabs. Small pets may be grouped together as pocket pets, while the equine and bovine group include the largest companion animals. Pets provide their owners (or "guardians") both physical and emotional benefits. Walking a dog can provide both the human and the dog with exercise, fresh air and social interaction. Pets can give companionship to people who are living alone or elderly adults who do not have adequate social interaction with other people. There is a medically approved class of therapy animals, mostly dogs or cats, that are brought to visit confined humans, such as children in hospitals or elders in nursing homes. Pet therapy utilizes trained animals and handlers to achieve specific physical, social, cognitive or emotional goals with patients. People most commonly get pets for companionship, to protect a home or property or because of the perceived beauty or attractiveness of the animals. A 1994 Canadian study found that the most common reasons for not owning a pet were lack of ability to care for the pet when traveling (34.6%), lack of time (28.6%) and lack of suitable housing (28.3%), with dislike of pets being less common (19.6%). Some scholars, ethicists and animal rights organizations have raised concerns over keeping pets because of the lack of autonomy and the objectification of non-human animals.

Webster Dictionary

  1. Pet(noun)

    a cade lamb; a lamb brought up by hand

    Etymology: [Perh. for petty cock.]

  2. Pet(noun)

    any person or animal especially cherished and indulged; a fondling; a darling; often, a favorite child

    Etymology: [Perh. for petty cock.]

  3. Pet(noun)

    a slight fit of peevishness or fretfulness

    Etymology: [Perh. for petty cock.]

  4. Pet(adj)

    petted; indulged; admired; cherished; as, a pet child; a pet lamb; a pet theory

    Etymology: [Perh. for petty cock.]

  5. Pet(verb)

    to treat as a pet; to fondle; to indulge; as, she was petted and spoiled

    Etymology: [Perh. for petty cock.]

  6. Pet(verb)

    to be a pet

    Etymology: [Perh. for petty cock.]

Freebase

  1. Pet

    A pet is an animal kept for a person's company, as opposed to livestock, laboratory animals, working animals and sport animals which are kept for economic reasons. The most popular pets are noted for their attractive appearances and their loyal or playful personalities. Their pedigree may also be a factor. In some cases pets may also provide their owners with benefits, such as providing companionship to elderly adults who do not have adequate social interaction with other people. While some people believe in the physical and emotional benefits of owning a pet, scientists are currently working to verify these ideas with medical studies. There is now a medically approved class of "therapy animals", mostly dogs, that are brought to visit confined humans. Pet therapy utilizes trained animals and handlers to achieve specific physical, social, cognitive, and emotional goals with patients. Walking a dog can provide both the owner and the dog with exercise, fresh air, and social interaction. The most popular pets are dogs and cats, but there are also rodent pets, such as gerbils, hamsters, chinchillas, fancy rats, and guinea pigs; avian pets, such as canaries, parakeets, and parrots; reptile pets, such as turtles, lizards and snakes; aquatic pets, such as tropical fish and frogs; and arthropod pets, such as tarantulas and hermit crabs.

Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

  1. Pet

    pet, n. any animal tame and fondled: a word of endearment often used to young children: a favourite child: a wilful young woman—also Peat.—adj. indulged: cherished: favourite.—v.t. to treat as a pet: to fondle:—pr.p. pet′ting; pa.t. and pa.p. pet′ted. [Celt., as Ir. peat, Gael. peata.]

  2. Pet

    pet, n. a sudden fit of peevishness or slight passion: ill-humour.—v.i. to be peevish, to sulk. [From the above word.]

Suggested Resources

  1. pet

    Song lyrics by pet -- Explore a large variety of song lyrics performed by pet on the Lyrics.com website.

  2. PET

    What does PET stand for? -- Explore the various meanings for the PET acronym on the Abbreviations.com website.

British National Corpus

  1. Written Corpus Frequency

    Rank popularity for the word 'pet' in Written Corpus Frequency: #4720

  2. Nouns Frequency

    Rank popularity for the word 'pet' in Nouns Frequency: #1943

How to pronounce pet?

  1. Alex
    Alex
    US English
    Daniel
    Daniel
    British
    Karen
    Karen
    Australian
    Veena
    Veena
    Indian

How to say pet in sign language?

  1. pet

Numerology

  1. Chaldean Numerology

    The numerical value of pet in Chaldean Numerology is: 8

  2. Pythagorean Numerology

    The numerical value of pet in Pythagorean Numerology is: 5

Examples of pet in a Sentence

  1. David Lummis:

    With so many families stuck at home, we have seen a significant rise in the pet population, and, of course, when you have new pets, those pet owners are the highest spenders in the market — across the board — when it comes to products and services, so that has really helped.

  2. Matthias Berninger:

    Pet food penetration in China is very, very low, people didn't believe chocolate would ever be something Chinese consumers would like, let alone that Chinese consumers would become passionate pet owners.

  3. Emelye Bunny:

    Australia is definitely the most complicated and strictest place to get a pet to, you have two things that are the first to be done: a rabies injection, a month's wait after then a blood test to ensure it has been effective.

  4. Jennifer Williams:

    It’s hard because everyone wants to pet the dog and play with the dog. One thing everyone always asks is if it’s so hard to give the puppy away, and you’re like yes. But I don’t really need the puppy. These people need the puppies more than I do. They need these service dogs. These service dogs do so much for people. They’re so incredible.

  5. Angelica Varela:

    The black-footed ferrets prey on prairie dogs so it was once thought that elimination programs for the dogs, considered a nuisance to farmers and ranchers, were impacting the ferret population. Now, there was a concerted effort by the state to rebuild the black-footed ferret population. On a recent day, volunteers made their way to small-town Seligman and met for training on the first night inside a rented home in a rural neighborhood that Arizona Game and Fish uses for the operation. One of those volunteers is Robert Coonrod, who bought a pick-up truck and rigged it with overhead lights specifically for the night-time searches. Robert Coonrod has been volunteering for five years. Though hes not a biologist, he enjoys helping out wildlife and found a new photography hobby while volunteering. HUNTERS TURN TO HIPSTERS TO HELP BOOST SPORTS DECLINING NUMBERS One of the volunteers is Robert Coonrod, who bought a pick-up truck and rigged it with overhead lights specifically for the night-time searches. ( Fox News) Were looking for a ferret to be outside his hole. We drive down, he gets curious, looks at the lights, you see the green eyes shine, and then its off to the races, Robert Coonrod said. Once the animalis spotted, volunteers run towardit and set up a trap. But they have to first hopscotch around prairie dog burrows that dot the landscape. Sometimes it can be very entertaining watching people run across a prairie dog colony because youre so focused on the ferret that you forget about all these holes on the ground, Holly Hicks said. Yeah, every one of us has tripped and fallen in a prairie dog hole after chasing after a ferret. ARIZONA MAN PICKED UP NEWBORN FAWN, TOOK IT TO LOCAL BAR, OFFICIALS SAY With freezing temperates on the first night of the search, around 10 of the volunteers showed up, including Arizona State Univerisity biology graduate Angelica Varela, who will soon be starting an internship with Bird Conservancy of the Rockies. With freezing temperates on the first night of the search, around 10 of the volunteers showed up( Fox News)( When I started) volunteering( for other wildlife organizations) and really getting boots on the ground and realizing the hard work that actually goes into it, its really important and its really satisfying being able to know that you had a part in helping a species, as conservation work, I mean were doing this so that eventually we dont have to keep doing it. Angelica Varela drove up from Phoenix with Angelica Varela friend, Brandi Kapos, who is an Olive Garden waitress and an Arizona State Univerisity conservation biology graduate. Shes looking to return to school to get a masters degree in Geographic Information Systems. Before Angelica Varela and Brandi Kapos got their assignment from Jennifer Cordova for the night, they said they had energy drinks and candy. Angelica Varela said Angelica Varela was pumped. With freezing temperates on the first night of the search, around 10 of the volunteers showed up, including Arizona State Univerisity biology graduates Angelica Varela and Brandi Kapos. ( Fox News) Jennifer Cordova said the goal is to get the black-footed ferret off the endangered species list. Fox News important because wildlife dont have a say -- theydont have a voice out there, Holly Hicks said. So, its people like us who manage and try to keep that voice out there and people aware. Our passion comes from a lot of places. We love animals. We want to see wildlife in the future for future generations. Only found in North America, this wild animal differs from the European pet ferrets that are domesticated. The black-footed ferret was once thought extinct until 18 were found in 1981. Since then, recovery and breeding efforts have helped the black-footed ferret population grow. I kind of feel like its our duty.

Images & Illustrations of pet

  1. petpetpetpetpet

Popularity rank by frequency of use

pet#1#1803#10000

Translations for pet

From our Multilingual Translation Dictionary

  • حيوان منزلي, حيوان اليفArabic
  • mascotaCatalan, Valencian
  • domácí mazlíčekCzech
  • kæle, kæledyrDanish
  • streicheln, Heimtier, Haustier, Pet, LieblingGerman
  • dorlotbesto, karesi, hejmbesto, karesiĝi, dombestoEsperanto
  • mascota, acariciarSpanish
  • حیوان خانگیPersian
  • hyväillä, silittää, lellikki, lemmikki, lemmikkieläinFinnish
  • chouchou, animal de compagnie, peloter, caresser, se peloter, animal familierFrench
  • peataIrish
  • חיית מחמדHebrew
  • पालतूHindi
  • simogat, házi kedvencHungarian
  • membelaiIndonesian
  • animale domestico, accarezzareItalian
  • ペット, 撫でるJapanese
  • შინაური ცხოველიGeorgian
  • ಪಿಇಟಿKannada
  • 펫, 愛玩動物, 애완동물Korean
  • petLatin
  • maimoa, mōkaiMāori
  • милува, мињон, љубимец, гали, домашен миленик, се гали, домашно миленичеMacedonian
  • haiwan peliharaanMalay
  • aaien, strelen, huisdierDutch
  • kjæle, kjærtegne, kose med, kjæledyrNorwegian
  • łį́į́ʼNavajo, Navaho
  • animal de estimação, acariciarPortuguese
  • mângâiaRomanian
  • ласкаться, ласкать, домашнее животное, питомец, любимец, гладитьRussian
  • mezimac, мезимац, ljubimac, maziti, миловати, miljenik, мазити, milovati, љубимац, миљеникSerbo-Croatian
  • husdjur, klappa, sällskapsdjur, keldjur, smekaSwedish
  • پالتو جانورUrdu
  • nimülVolapük
  • 宠物Chinese
  • ukuntoko, ukunto, isilwane sasekhayaZulu

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    either of two different animal or plant species living in close association but not interdependent
    • A. valetudinarian
    • B. numinous
    • C. bibulous
    • D. commensal

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