What does pedestal mean?

Definitions for pedestal
ˈpɛd ə stlpedestal

Here are all the possible meanings and translations of the word pedestal.

Princeton's WordNet

  1. base, pedestal, standnoun

    a support or foundation

    "the base of the lamp"

  2. pedestalnoun

    a position of great esteem (and supposed superiority)

    "they put him on a pedestal"

  3. pedestal, plinth, footstallnoun

    an architectural support or base (as for a column or statue)

GCIDE

  1. Pedestalnoun

    Hence: A short free-standing column or column-like object designed to support a work of art or other object; a column serving the same function as the base of a statue. It may be made of wood, marble, or other suitable material.

    Etymology: [Sp. pedestal; cf. F. pidestal, It. piedestallo; fr. L. es, pedis, foot + OHG. stal standing place, station, place, akin to E. stall. See Foot, and Stall, and Footstall.]

  2. Pedestalnoun

    (Furniture) A part of a desk which contains a frame and drawers, stands on the floor, and provides support for the desk surface. There may be zero, one, or two such pedestals in a desk.

    Etymology: [Sp. pedestal; cf. F. pidestal, It. piedestallo; fr. L. es, pedis, foot + OHG. stal standing place, station, place, akin to E. stall. See Foot, and Stall, and Footstall.]

Wiktionary

  1. pedestalnoun

    The base or foot of a column, statue, vase, lamp, or the like; the part on which an upright work stands. It consists of three parts, the base, the die or dado, and the cornice or surbase molding. See Illust. of {Column}.

    Etymology: From piédestal, from piedistallo (pie "foot" di "of" stall "stand") "footstall".

  2. pedestalnoun

    Pedestal coil (steam heating), a group of connected straight pipes arranged side by side and one above another, -- used in a radiator.

    Etymology: From piédestal, from piedistallo (pie "foot" di "of" stall "stand") "footstall".

  3. pedestalverb

    To set or support on (or as if on) a pedestal

    Etymology: From piédestal, from piedistallo (pie "foot" di "of" stall "stand") "footstall".

Webster Dictionary

  1. Pedestalnoun

    the base or foot of a column, statue, vase, lamp, or the like; the part on which an upright work stands. It consists of three parts, the base, the die or dado, and the cornice or surbase molding. See Illust. of Column

    Etymology: [Sp. pedestal; cf. F. pidestal, It. piedestallo; fr. L. es, pedis, foot + OHG. stal standing place, station, place, akin to E. stall. See Foot, and Stall, and Footstall.]

  2. Pedestalnoun

    a casting secured to the frame of a truck and forming a jaw for holding a journal box

    Etymology: [Sp. pedestal; cf. F. pidestal, It. piedestallo; fr. L. es, pedis, foot + OHG. stal standing place, station, place, akin to E. stall. See Foot, and Stall, and Footstall.]

  3. Pedestalnoun

    a pillow block; a low housing

    Etymology: [Sp. pedestal; cf. F. pidestal, It. piedestallo; fr. L. es, pedis, foot + OHG. stal standing place, station, place, akin to E. stall. See Foot, and Stall, and Footstall.]

  4. Pedestalnoun

    an iron socket, or support, for the foot of a brace at the end of a truss where it rests on a pier

    Etymology: [Sp. pedestal; cf. F. pidestal, It. piedestallo; fr. L. es, pedis, foot + OHG. stal standing place, station, place, akin to E. stall. See Foot, and Stall, and Footstall.]

Freebase

  1. Pedestal

    Pedestal is a term generally applied to the support of a statue or a vase. Although in Syria, Asia Minor and Tunisia the Romans occasionally raised the columns of their temples or propylaea on square pedestals, in Rome itself they were employed only to give greater importance to isolated columns, such as those of Trajan and Antoninus, or as a podium to the columns employed decoratively in the Roman triumphal arches. The architects of the Italian revival, however, conceived the idea that no order was complete without a pedestal, and as the orders were by them employed to divide up and decorate a building in several stories, the cornice of the pedestal was carried through and formed the sills of their windows, or, in open arcades, round a court, the balustrade of the arcade. They also would seem to have considered that the height of the pedestal should correspond in its proportion with that of the column or pilaster it supported; thus in the church of Saint John Lateran, where the applied order is of considerable dimensions, the pedestal is 13 feet high instead of the ordinary height of 3 to 5 feet. In the imperial China, a stone tortoise called bixi was traditionally used as the pedestal for important stele, especially those associated with emperors. According to the 1396 version of the regulations issued by the Ming Dynasty founder, the Hongwu Emperor, the highest nobility and the officials of the top 3 ranks were eligible for bixi-based funerary tablets, while lower-level mandarins' steles were to stand on simple rectangular pedestals.

Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

  1. Pedestal

    ped′es-tal, n. anything that serves as a foot or a support: the foot or base of a pillar, &c.: the fixed casting which holds the brasses, in which a shaft turns, called also Axle-guard or Pillow-block.—v.t. to place on a pedestal. [Sp.,—It. piedestallo—L. pes, pedis, the foot, It. stallo, a place.]

Matched Categories

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Numerology

  1. Chaldean Numerology

    The numerical value of pedestal in Chaldean Numerology is: 6

  2. Pythagorean Numerology

    The numerical value of pedestal in Pythagorean Numerology is: 1

Examples of pedestal in a Sentence

  1. Stephen Jay Gould:

    The most important scientific revolutions all include, as their only common feature, the dethronement of human arrogance from one pedestal after another of previous convictions about our centrality in the cosmos.

  2. Des Barres:

    He made you feel like you were the only woman alive. And he took me everywhere. I ’ll never forget that night at the Elvis concert — or the hours spent with Jimmy afterward on a huge bed up on a pedestal.

  3. Woody Allen:

    For the first year of marriage I had basically a bad attitude. I tended to place my wife underneath a pedestal

  4. Deodatta V. Shenai-Khatkhate:

    I often think of Shelley's famous insightful sonnet "Ozymandias" that brilliantly depicts the inevitable fall of all foolishly arrogant leaders and their huge empires built in pretensions to their self-proclaimed greatness. Nature and Time always prevail and overtake ultimately, when nothing remains of those great empires or the arrogant leaders.....and only the lone and level sands stretch far away. Vanity, false pride and arrogance never win, in my view. Humility is the true key success. Here is that famous sonnet "Ozymandias" by Percy Shelley, written in January 1818, nearly 200 years ago. "I met a traveller from an antique land Who said: "Two vast and trunkless legs of stone Stand in the desert. Near them, on the sand, Half sunk, a shattered visage lies, whose frown, And wrinkled lip, and sneer of cold command, Tell that its sculptor well those passions read Which yet survive, stamped on these lifeless things, The hand that mocked them and the heart that fed: And on the pedestal these words appear: 'My name is Ozymandias, king of kings: Look on my works, ye Mighty, and despair!' Nothing beside remains. Round the decay Of that colossal wreck, boundless and bare The lone and level sands stretch far away.

  5. George Miller:

    I needed a warrior. But it couldn't be a man taking five wives from another man. That's an entirely different story. So everything grew out of that. to celebrate everything there is about being a woman, and not trying to put women on a pedestal, but being surrounded by other women in a story that was just real.

Images & Illustrations of pedestal

  1. pedestalpedestalpedestalpedestalpedestal

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Translations for pedestal

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    easily diffused or spread as from one person to another
    • A. epidemic
    • B. contagious
    • C. aculeate
    • D. incumbent

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