What does oxygen mean?

Definitions for oxygen
ˈɒk sɪ dʒənoxy·gen

This dictionary definitions page includes all the possible meanings, example usage and translations of the word oxygen.

Princeton's WordNet

  1. oxygen, O, atomic number 8noun

    a nonmetallic bivalent element that is normally a colorless odorless tasteless nonflammable diatomic gas; constitutes 21 percent of the atmosphere by volume; the most abundant element in the earth's crust

GCIDE

  1. Oxygennoun

    (Chem.) A colorless, tasteless, odorless, gaseous element of atomic number 8, occurring in the free state in the atmosphere, of which it forms about 23 per cent by weight and about 21 per cent by volume, being slightly heavier than nitrogen. Symbol O. Atomic weight 15.9994.

Wiktionary

  1. oxygennoun

    A chemical element (symbol O) with an atomic number of 8 and relative atomic mass of 15.9994.

  2. oxygennoun

    Molecular oxygen (O), a colorless, odorless gas at room temperature.

  3. oxygennoun

    A mixture of oxygen and other gases, administered to a patient to help him or her to breathe.

  4. oxygennoun

    An atom of this element.

  5. Etymology: Borrowed from oxygène (originally in the form principe oxygène, a variant of principe oxigine ‘acidifying principle’, suggested by Lavoisier), from ὀξύς + γένος, referring to oxygen's role in the formation of acids.

Wikipedia

  1. Oxygen

    Oxygen is the chemical element with the symbol O and atomic number 8. It is a member of the chalcogen group in the periodic table, a highly reactive nonmetal, and an oxidizing agent that readily forms oxides with most elements as well as with other compounds. Oxygen is Earth's most abundant element, and after hydrogen and helium, it is the third-most abundant element in the universe. At standard temperature and pressure, two atoms of the element bind to form dioxygen, a colorless and odorless diatomic gas with the formula O2. Diatomic oxygen gas currently constitutes 20.95% of the Earth's atmosphere, though this has changed considerably over long periods of time. Oxygen makes up almost half of the Earth's crust in the form of oxides.Many major classes of organic molecules in living organisms contain oxygen atoms, such as proteins, nucleic acids, carbohydrates, and fats, as do the major constituent inorganic compounds of animal shells, teeth, and bone. Most of the mass of living organisms is oxygen as a component of water, the major constituent of lifeforms. Oxygen is continuously replenished in Earth's atmosphere by photosynthesis, which uses the energy of sunlight to produce oxygen from water and carbon dioxide. Oxygen is too chemically reactive to remain a free element in air without being continuously replenished by the photosynthetic action of living organisms. Another form (allotrope) of oxygen, ozone (O3), strongly absorbs ultraviolet UVB radiation and the high-altitude ozone layer helps protect the biosphere from ultraviolet radiation. However, ozone present at the surface is a byproduct of smog and thus a pollutant. Oxygen was isolated by Michael Sendivogius before 1604, but it is commonly believed that the element was discovered independently by Carl Wilhelm Scheele, in Uppsala, in 1773 or earlier, and Joseph Priestley in Wiltshire, in 1774. Priority is often given for Priestley because his work was published first. Priestley, however, called oxygen "dephlogisticated air", and did not recognize it as a chemical element. The name oxygen was coined in 1777 by Antoine Lavoisier, who first recognized oxygen as a chemical element and correctly characterized the role it plays in combustion. Common uses of oxygen include production of steel, plastics and textiles, brazing, welding and cutting of steels and other metals, rocket propellant, oxygen therapy, and life support systems in aircraft, submarines, spaceflight and diving.

ChatGPT

  1. oxygen

    Oxygen is a chemical element with the symbol O and atomic number 8. It is a member of the chalcogen group on the periodic table and a highly reactive nonmetallic element that readily forms compounds (notably oxides) with most elements. It is the third-most abundant element in the universe by mass and one of the key elements necessary for life processes such as respiration and energy production in living organisms. Oxygen is also crucial for combustion processes. At standard temperature and pressure, two atoms of the element bind to form dioxygen, a colorless and odorless diatomic gas with the formula O2.

Wikidata

  1. Oxygen

    Oxygen is a chemical element with symbol O and atomic number 8. Its name derives from the Greek roots ὀξύς and -γόνος, because at the time of naming, it was mistakenly thought that all acids required oxygen in their composition. At standard temperature and pressure, two atoms of the element bind to form dioxygen, a colorless, odorless, tasteless diatomic gas with the formula O2. This substance is an important part of the atmosphere, and is necessary to sustain most terrestrial life. Oxygen is a member of the chalcogen group on the periodic table and is a highly reactive nonmetallic element that readily forms compounds with most elements except the noble gases Helium and Neon. Oxygen is a strong oxidizing agent and only fluorine has greater electronegativity. By mass, oxygen is the third-most abundant element in the universe, after hydrogen and helium and the most abundant element by mass in the Earth's crust, making up almost half of the crust's mass. Oxygen is too chemically reactive to remain a free element in Earth's atmosphere without being continuously replenished by the photosynthetic action of living organisms, which use the energy of sunlight to produce elemental oxygen from water. Free elemental O2 only began to accumulate in the atmosphere about 2.5 billion years ago about a billion years after the first appearance of these organisms. Diatomic oxygen gas constitutes 20.8% of the volume of air.

Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

  1. Oxygen

    oks′i-jen, n. a gas without taste, colour, or smell, forming part of the air, water, &c., and supporting life and combustion.—n. Oxychlō′ride, a chemical compound containing both chlorine and oxygen in combination with some other element.—v.t. Ox′ygenāte, to unite, or cause to unite, with oxygen.—n. Oxygenā′tion, act of oxygenating.—v.t. Ox′ygenise (same as Oxygenate).—adj. Oxyg′enous, pertaining to, or obtained from, oxygen.—adj. Oxyhy′drogen, pertaining to a mixture of oxygen and hydrogen, as in a form of blowpipe in which jets of either ignite as they issue from separate reservoirs. [Gr. oxys, sharp, gen, the root of gennaein, to generate.]

The Nuttall Encyclopedia

  1. Oxygen

    a colourless, inodorous gas which constitutes one-fifth in volume of the atmosphere, and which, in combination with hydrogen, forms water. It is the most widely diffused of all the elementary bodies, and an essential support to everything possessed of life.

U.S. National Library of Medicine

  1. Oxygen

    An element with atomic symbol O, atomic number 8, and atomic weight 16. It is the most abundant element on earth and essential for respiration.

Editors Contribution

  1. oxygen

    An element.

    Oxygen is vital for life.


    Submitted by MaryC on January 30, 2020  

Suggested Resources

  1. oxygen

    Song lyrics by oxygen -- Explore a large variety of song lyrics performed by oxygen on the Lyrics.com website.

British National Corpus

  1. Written Corpus Frequency

    Rank popularity for the word 'oxygen' in Written Corpus Frequency: #3520

  2. Nouns Frequency

    Rank popularity for the word 'oxygen' in Nouns Frequency: #1913

How to pronounce oxygen?

How to say oxygen in sign language?

Numerology

  1. Chaldean Numerology

    The numerical value of oxygen in Chaldean Numerology is: 8

  2. Pythagorean Numerology

    The numerical value of oxygen in Pythagorean Numerology is: 9

Examples of oxygen in a Sentence

  1. Nick Gourevitch.Republican pollster Gene Ulm:

    All the oxygen has just been squeezed out, health care before meant,' Will I be able to get coverage ? How much will I have to pay for it ?' Now it's all the Covid.

  2. Maggie Moon:

    Water warms you up another way as well. It helps power your metabolism, and a sluggish metabolism translates into less overall body heat. Aim for the requisite eight glasses a day at a minimum, recommended Maggie Moon, but always drink more before and after workouts. RELATED : 12 Reasons Dehydration Is Bad for Your Body You don't consume enough vitamin B12 This nutrient found only in animal products plays big role in preventing big chills. The body needs vitamin B12 to make red blood cells, which carry oxygen through your system.

  3. Francinara Soares:

    We are living a war against COVID. It’s a war against an invisible enemy, a war against time ... we don’t want to see any more people pass away, we hope to get enough oxygen. We hope to get vaccine for 100% of the indigenous population.

  4. Mary Saladino:

    When you’re feeling that fear you’re going to lose your child, you have to be thinking what would I want to give him as his mom if this is it? I want him to hear how much we love him, but also oh my God, I have to save him, what’s his oxygen level? Do I need to resuscitate him? Did I give the first dose of rescue medication? it’s an unbelievable amount of trauma and it’s going to happen over and over again, no matter what we do, until we develop this treatment.

  5. Chanmin Hu:

    The oxygen in the water is so low that many animals can die.

Popularity rank by frequency of use

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Translations for oxygen

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"oxygen." Definitions.net. STANDS4 LLC, 2024. Web. 22 Apr. 2024. <https://www.definitions.net/definition/oxygen>.

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