What does origin mean?

Definitions for origin
ˈɔr ɪ dʒɪn, ˈɒr-ori·gin

Here are all the possible meanings and translations of the word origin.

Princeton's WordNet

  1. beginning, origin, root, rootage, source(noun)

    the place where something begins, where it springs into being

    "the Italian beginning of the Renaissance"; "Jupiter was the origin of the radiation"; "Pittsburgh is the source of the Ohio River"; "communism's Russian root"

  2. origin, descent, extraction(noun)

    properties attributable to your ancestry

    "he comes from good origins"

  3. origin, origination, inception(noun)

    an event that is a beginning; a first part or stage of subsequent events

  4. origin(noun)

    the point of intersection of coordinate axes; where the values of the coordinates are all zero

  5. origin(noun)

    the source of something's existence or from which it derives or is derived

    "the rumor had its origin in idle gossip"; "vegetable origins"; "mineral origin"; "origin in sensation"

  6. lineage, line, line of descent, descent, bloodline, blood line, blood, pedigree, ancestry, origin, parentage, stemma, stock(noun)

    the descendants of one individual

    "his entire lineage has been warriors"

Wiktionary

  1. origin(Noun)

    The beginning of something.

    Etymology: From origine, from origo, from oriri; see orient.

  2. origin(Noun)

    The source of a river, information, goods, etc.

    Etymology: From origine, from origo, from oriri; see orient.

  3. origin(Noun)

    The point at which the axes of a coordinate system intersect

    Etymology: From origine, from origo, from oriri; see orient.

  4. origin(Noun)

    The proximal end of attachment of a muscle to a bone that will not be moved by the action of that muscle.

    Etymology: From origine, from origo, from oriri; see orient.

  5. origin(Noun)

    an arbitrary point on the earth's surface, chosen as the zero for a system of coordinates.

    Etymology: From origine, from origo, from oriri; see orient.

  6. origin(Noun)

    ancestry

    Etymology: From origine, from origo, from oriri; see orient.

Freebase

  1. Origin

    In mathematics, the origin of a Euclidean space is a special point, usually denoted by the letter O, used as a fixed point of reference for the geometry of the surrounding space. In a Cartesian coordinate system, the origin is the point where the axes of the system intersect. In Euclidean geometry, the origin may be chosen freely as any convenient point of reference. The most common coordinate systems are two-dimensional and three-dimensional, composed of two and three perpendicular axes, respectively. The origin divides each of these axes into two halves, a positive and a negative semiaxis. Points can then be located with reference to the origin by giving their numerical coordinates—that is, the positions of their projections along each axis, either in the positive or negative direction. The coordinates of the origin are always all zero, for example in two dimensions and in three. The origin of the complex plane can be referred as the point where real axis and imaginary axis intersect each other. In other words, it is the point representing 0 + 0i.

Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

  1. Origin

    or′i-jin, n. the rising or first existence of anything: that from which anything first proceeds: (math.) the fixed starting-point: cause: derivation.—adjs. Orig′inable; Orig′inal, pertaining to the origin or beginning: first in order or existence: in the author's own words or from the artist's own pencil: not copied: not translated: having the power to originate, as thought.—n. origin: first copy: the precise language used by a writer: an untranslated tongue: a person of marked individuality.—ns. Original′ity, Orig′inalness, quality or state of being original or of originating ideas.—adv. Orig′inally.—v.t. Orig′ināte, to give origin to: to bring into existence.—v.i. to have origin: to begin.—n. Originā′tion, act of originating or of coming into existence: mode of production.—adj. Orig′inātive, having power to originate or bring into existence.—n. Orig′inātor. [Fr. origine—L. origo, originisorīri, to rise.]

Dictionary of Military and Associated Terms

  1. origin

    Beginning point of a deployment where unit or non-unit-related cargo or personnel are located.

Dictionary of Nautical Terms

  1. origin

    Merchant ships claiming benefit for importation, must obtain and produce certificates of origin, in respect to the goods they claim for. (See PRODUCTION.)

Editors Contribution

  1. origin

    A point or location.

    The origin of football is well known and understood.

    Submitted by MaryC on March 9, 2020  

Suggested Resources

  1. origin

    Song lyrics by origin -- Explore a large variety of song lyrics performed by origin on the Lyrics.com website.

British National Corpus

  1. Spoken Corpus Frequency

    Rank popularity for the word 'origin' in Spoken Corpus Frequency: #3297

  2. Nouns Frequency

    Rank popularity for the word 'origin' in Nouns Frequency: #966

How to pronounce origin?

  1. Alex
    US English
    Daniel
    British
    Karen
    Australian
    Veena
    Indian

How to say origin in sign language?

Numerology

  1. Chaldean Numerology

    The numerical value of origin in Chaldean Numerology is: 1

  2. Pythagorean Numerology

    The numerical value of origin in Pythagorean Numerology is: 9

Examples of origin in a Sentence

  1. Ron Ballouz:

    One of the biggest mysteries surrounding Phobos is its origin was it created from a giant impact onto Mars that created a debris disk around the planet that eventually coalesced into Phobos, or was it once an asteroid that was captured by Mars gravity?

  2. Federico Bernardini:

    Investigation of the sites will be crucial to study early Roman military architecture and the origin of Roman military camps.

  3. George Jellinek:

    The idea of legally establishing inalienable, inherent and sacred rights of the individual is not of political but religious origin.

  4. Bernie Sanders:

    Not Donald Trump, not anyone else will be successful in dividing us based on race or our country of origin, racism has plagued the United States since its inception.

  5. European Commission:

    As long as countries of origin and transit do not take action to prevent these desperate trips, people will continue to put their lives at risk.

Images & Illustrations of origin

  1. originoriginoriginoriginorigin

Popularity rank by frequency of use

origin#1#2518#10000

Translations for origin

From our Multilingual Translation Dictionary

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    weak or sickly person especially one morbidly concerned with his or her health
    • A. motile
    • B. currish
    • C. valetudinarian
    • D. askant

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