What does narcotic mean?

Definitions for narcotic
nɑrˈkɒt ɪknar·cot·ic

This dictionary definitions page includes all the possible meanings, example usage and translations of the word narcotic.

Princeton's WordNet

  1. narcoticadjective

    a drug that produces numbness or stupor; often taken for pleasure or to reduce pain; extensive use can lead to addiction

  2. narcoticadjective

    of or relating to or designating narcotics

    "narcotic addicts"; "narcotic stupor"

  3. narcotic, narcotizing, narcotisingadjective

    inducing stupor or narcosis

    "narcotic drugs"

  4. narcotic, soporiferous, soporificadjective

    inducing mental lethargy

    "a narcotic speech"

Wiktionary

  1. narcoticnoun

    Any class of substances or drugs, that reduces pain, induces sleep and may alter mood or behaviour.

  2. narcoticnoun

    Any type of numbing drug.

  3. narcoticnoun

    Certain illegal drugs.

  4. narcoticadjective

    Of, or relating to narcotics.

  5. narcoticadjective

    Inducing sleep; causing narcosis.

Wikipedia

  1. Narcotic

    The term narcotic (, from ancient Greek ναρκῶ narkō, "to make numb") originally referred medically to any psychoactive compound with numbing or paralyzing properties. In the United States, it has since become associated with opiates and opioids, commonly morphine and heroin, as well as derivatives of many of the compounds found within raw opium latex. The primary three are morphine, codeine, and thebaine (while thebaine itself is only very mildly psychoactive, it is a crucial precursor in the vast majority of semi-synthetic opioids, such as oxycodone or hydrocodone). Legally speaking, the term "narcotic" may be imprecisely defined and typically has negative connotations. When used in a legal context in the U.S., a narcotic drug is totally prohibited, such as heroin, or one that is used in violation of legal regulation (in this word sense, equal to any controlled substance or illicit drug). In the medical community, the term is more precisely defined and generally does not carry the same negative connotations.Statutory classification of a drug as a narcotic often increases the penalties for violation of drug control statutes. For example, although U.S. federal law classifies both cocaine and amphetamines as "Schedule II" drugs, the penalty for possession of cocaine is greater than the penalty for possession of amphetamines because cocaine, unlike amphetamines, is classified as a narcotic.

ChatGPT

  1. narcotic

    A narcotic is a type of drug that reduces pain, induces sleep, and can alter mood or behavior. Often derived from opium or produced synthetically, these substances can cause addiction and are controlled by law due to their potential abuses. It includes substances such as heroin, morphine, and certain prescription medications used for pain management.

Webster Dictionary

  1. Narcoticadjective

    having the properties of a narcotic; operating as a narcotic

  2. Narcoticnoun

    a drug which, in medicinal doses, generally allays morbid susceptibility, relieves pain, and produces sleep; but which, in poisonous doses, produces stupor, coma, or convulsions, and, when given in sufficient quantity, causes death. The best examples are opium (with morphine), belladonna (with atropine), and conium

  3. Etymology: [F. narcotique, Gr. narkwtiko`s, fr. narkoy^n to benumb, na`rkh numbness, torpor.]

Wikidata

  1. Narcotic

    The term narcotic originally referred medically to any psychoactive compound with any sleep-inducing properties. In the United States it has since become associated with opioids, commonly morphine and heroin and their derivatives, such as hydrocodone. The term is, today, imprecisely defined and typically has negative connotations. When used in a legal context in the U.S., a narcotic drug is simply one that is totally prohibited, or one that is used in violation of strict governmental regulation, such as heroin or morphine. From a pharmacological standpoint it is not a useful term, as is evidenced by the fact that spirit and wine are classified differently due to their intoxicating power; while the narcotic principle to opium and tobacco imparts similar properties. In popular language, alcohol is classed among the stimulants; and opium and tobacco among the narcotics; which are substances whose ultimate effect upon the animal system is to produce torpor and insensibility; but taken in small quantities they at first exhilarate. And since alcohol does the same, most medical writers, at the present day, class it among the narcotics.

Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

  1. Narcotic

    nar-kot′ik, adj. having power to produce torpor, sleep, or deadness.—n. a medicine producing sleep or stupor.—n. Narcō′sis, the stupefying effect of a narcotic.—adv. Narcot′ically.—n. Nar′cotine, one of the organic bases or alkaloids occurring in opium.—v.t. Nar′cotise.—n. Nar′cotism, the influence of narcotics, or the effects produced by their use. [Fr.,—Gr. narkē, torpor.]

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Numerology

  1. Chaldean Numerology

    The numerical value of narcotic in Chaldean Numerology is: 8

  2. Pythagorean Numerology

    The numerical value of narcotic in Pythagorean Numerology is: 2

Examples of narcotic in a Sentence

  1. Stuart Stevens:

    Pride is a powerful narcotic, but it doesn't do much for the auto-immune system.

  2. The Russian Federal Customs Service:

    ' The customs inspection of the hand luggage being carried by the United States citizen confirmed the presence of vapes with specifically smelling liquid, and an expert determined that the liquid was cannabis oil( hash oil), which is a narcotic substance,'.

  3. Margaret Mims:

    Weve got a lot of things to do, including taking guns away from gang members, stopping narcotic trafficking, and saving children from internet predators.

  4. Franklin D. Roosevelt:

    We have here a human as well as an economic problem. When humane considerations are concerned, Americans give them precedence. The lessons of history, confirmed by the evidence immediately before me, show conclusively that continued dependence upon relief induces a spiritual and moral disintegration fundamentally destructive to the national fibre. To dole out relief in this way is to administer a narcotic, a subtle destroyer of the human spirit.

  5. William Jacobson:

    The city would have to be sure it’s dotted all the legal i’s and crossed all the legal t’s before it gets into assisting the use of a narcotic.

Popularity rank by frequency of use

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Translations for narcotic

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"narcotic." Definitions.net. STANDS4 LLC, 2024. Web. 30 May 2024. <https://www.definitions.net/definition/narcotic>.

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