What does mould mean?

Definitions for mould
moʊldmould

Here are all the possible meanings and translations of the word mould.

Princeton's WordNet

  1. mold, mouldnoun

    loose soil rich in organic matter

  2. cast, mold, mould, stampnoun

    the distinctive form in which a thing is made

    "pottery of this cast was found throughout the region"

  3. mildew, mold, mouldnoun

    the process of becoming mildewed

  4. mold, mouldnoun

    a fungus that produces a superficial growth on various kinds of damp or decaying organic matter

  5. mold, mouldnoun

    a dish or dessert that is formed in or on a mold

    "a lobster mold"; "a gelatin dessert made in a mold"

  6. mold, mouldnoun

    a distinctive nature, character, or type

    "a leader in the mold of her predecessors"

  7. mold, mould, molding, moulding, modeling, clay sculpturenoun

    sculpture produced by molding

  8. mold, mould, castverb

    container into which liquid is poured to create a given shape when it hardens

  9. model, mold, mouldverb

    form in clay, wax, etc

    "model a head with clay"

  10. cast, mold, mouldverb

    form by pouring (e.g., wax or hot metal) into a cast or mold

    "cast a bronze sculpture"

  11. shape, form, work, mold, mould, forgeverb

    make something, usually for a specific function

    "She molded the rice balls carefully"; "Form cylinders from the dough"; "shape a figure"; "Work the metal into a sword"

Webster Dictionary

  1. Mould

    crumbling, soft, friable earth; esp., earth containing the remains or constituents of organic matter, and suited to the growth of plants; soil

    Etymology: [OE. molde, OF. mole, F. moule, fr. L. modulus. See Model.]

  2. Mould

    earthy material; the matter of which anything is formed; composing substance; material

    Etymology: [OE. molde, OF. mole, F. moule, fr. L. modulus. See Model.]

  3. Mouldverb

    to cover with mold or soil

    Etymology: [OE. molde, OF. mole, F. moule, fr. L. modulus. See Model.]

  4. Mouldnoun

    a growth of minute fungi of various kinds, esp. those of the great groups Hyphomycetes, and Physomycetes, forming on damp or decaying organic matter

    Etymology: [OE. molde, OF. mole, F. moule, fr. L. modulus. See Model.]

  5. Mouldverb

    to cause to become moldy; to cause mold to grow upon

    Etymology: [OE. molde, OF. mole, F. moule, fr. L. modulus. See Model.]

  6. Mouldverb

    to become moldy; to be covered or filled, in whole or in part, with a mold

    Etymology: [OE. molde, OF. mole, F. moule, fr. L. modulus. See Model.]

  7. Mouldnoun

    the matrix, or cavity, in which anything is shaped, and from which it takes its form; also, the body or mass containing the cavity; as, a sand mold; a jelly mold

    Etymology: [OE. molde, OF. mole, F. moule, fr. L. modulus. See Model.]

  8. Mouldnoun

    that on which, or in accordance with which, anything is modeled or formed; anything which serves to regulate the size, form, etc., as the pattern or templet used by a shipbuilder, carpenter, or mason

    Etymology: [OE. molde, OF. mole, F. moule, fr. L. modulus. See Model.]

  9. Mouldnoun

    cast; form; shape; character

    Etymology: [OE. molde, OF. mole, F. moule, fr. L. modulus. See Model.]

  10. Mouldnoun

    a group of moldings; as, the arch mold of a porch or doorway; the pier mold of a Gothic pier, meaning the whole profile, section, or combination of parts

    Etymology: [OE. molde, OF. mole, F. moule, fr. L. modulus. See Model.]

  11. Mouldnoun

    a fontanel

    Etymology: [OE. molde, OF. mole, F. moule, fr. L. modulus. See Model.]

  12. Mouldnoun

    a frame with a wire cloth bottom, on which the pump is drained to form a sheet, in making paper by hand

    Etymology: [OE. molde, OF. mole, F. moule, fr. L. modulus. See Model.]

  13. Mouldverb

    to form into a particular shape; to shape; to model; to fashion

    Etymology: [OE. molde, OF. mole, F. moule, fr. L. modulus. See Model.]

  14. Mouldverb

    to ornament by molding or carving the material of; as, a molded window jamb

    Etymology: [OE. molde, OF. mole, F. moule, fr. L. modulus. See Model.]

  15. Mouldverb

    to knead; as, to mold dough or bread

    Etymology: [OE. molde, OF. mole, F. moule, fr. L. modulus. See Model.]

  16. Mouldverb

    to form a mold of, as in sand, in which a casting may be made

    Etymology: [OE. molde, OF. mole, F. moule, fr. L. modulus. See Model.]

  17. Mould

    alt. of Mouldy

    Etymology: [OE. molde, OF. mole, F. moule, fr. L. modulus. See Model.]

Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

  1. Mould

    mōld, n. dust: soil rich in decayed matter: the matter of which anything is composed: a minute fungus which grows on bodies in a damp atmosphere, so named from often growing on mould: the earth, the ground, the grave, esp. in pl. Mools (Scot.).—v.t. to cover with mould or soil: to cause to become mouldy.—v.i. to become mouldy.—n. Mould′-board, the curved plate in a plough which turns over the furrow.—v.i. Mould′er, to crumble to mould: to turn to dust: to waste away gradually.—v.t. to turn to dust.—ns. Mould′iness; Mould′warp, the mole, which casts up little heaps of mould.—adj. Mould′y, overgrown with mould. [A.S. molde; Ger. mull, Goth. mulda.]

  2. Mould

    mōld, n. a hollow form in which anything is cast: a pattern; the form received from a mould, a former or matrix for jellies, &c., also a dish shaped in such: character.—v.t. to form in a mould: to knead, as dough.—adj. Mould′able, that may be moulded.—ns. Mould′-box, a box in which molten steel is hydraulically compressed; Mould′er; Mould′-fac′ing, a fine powder or wash applied to the face of a mould to ensure a smooth casting; Mould′ing, the process of shaping, esp. any soft substance: anything formed by or in a mould: an ornamental edging on a picture-frame, &c., or (archit.) raised above or sunk below the surface of a wall, on cornices, jambs, lintels, &c.—the fillet or list, astragal or bead, ogee, cyma, &c.; Moulding-tā′ble, a table on which a potter moulds his ware; Mould′-loft, a large room in a shipbuilding yard in which the several parts of a ship's hull are laid off to full size from the construction drawings.—Moulding machine, a machine for making wood-mouldings; Moulding plane, a plane used in forming mouldings, a match-plane; Moulding sand, a mixture of sand and loam used by founders in making sand-moulds. [Fr. moule—L. modulus, a measure.]

British National Corpus

  1. Nouns Frequency

    Rank popularity for the word 'mould' in Nouns Frequency: #3009

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Numerology

  1. Chaldean Numerology

    The numerical value of mould in Chaldean Numerology is: 6

  2. Pythagorean Numerology

    The numerical value of mould in Pythagorean Numerology is: 2

Examples of mould in a Sentence

  1. Mickey Mehta:

    For most of the things children do, parents are responsible. A good seed, noble thoughts and upbringing deeds can determine the character and personality feeds of our children. The amount of money we spend on them is not funny, to please them that's ain't the way honey! Give them your time to make their life sublime. Children are soft clay, mould them the appropriate way. Let your children's life not be compromised, let them blossom in fertile fields to Get Mickeymized.

  2. Daniel Day Lewis:

    You don't merely give over your creativity to making a film-you give over your life In theatre, by contrast, you live these two rather strange lives simultaneously you have no option but to confront the mould on last night's washing-up.

  3. John Adams:

    [D]emocracy will soon degenerate into an anarchy, such an anarchy that every man will do what is right in his own eyes and no man's life or property or reputation or liberty will be secure, and every one of these will soon mould itself into a system of subordination of all the moral virtues and intellectual abilities, all the powers of wealth, beauty, wit and science, to the wanton pleasures, the capricious will, and the execrable cruelty of one or a very few.

  4. Michel Foucault:

    The work of an intellectual is not to mould the political will of others; it is, through the analyses that he does in his own field, to re-examine evidence and assumptions, to shake up habitual ways of working and thinking, to dissipate conventional familiarities, to re-evaluate rules and institutions and to participate in the formation of a political will (where he has his role as citizen to play).

  5. John Milton, Paradise Lost:

    Did I request thee Maker, from my clay, to mould me Man? Did I solicit thee from darkness, to promote me?

Images & Illustrations of mould

  1. mouldmouldmouldmouldmould

Popularity rank by frequency of use

mould#10000#20940#100000

Translations for mould

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    evincing the presence of a deity
    • A. motile
    • B. numinous
    • C. tantamount
    • D. lank

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