What does medicine mean?

Definitions for medicine
ˈmɛd ə sɪn; esp. Brit. ˈmɛd sənmedicine

Here are all the possible meanings and translations of the word medicine.

Princeton's WordNet

  1. medicine, medical specialtynoun

    the branches of medical science that deal with nonsurgical techniques

  2. medicine, medication, medicament, medicinal drugnoun

    (medicine) something that treats or prevents or alleviates the symptoms of disease

  3. medicine, practice of medicinenoun

    the learned profession that is mastered by graduate training in a medical school and that is devoted to preventing or alleviating or curing diseases and injuries

    "he studied medicine at Harvard"

  4. music, medicineverb

    punishment for one's actions

    "you have to face the music"; "take your medicine"

  5. medicate, medicineverb

    treat medicinally, treat with medicine

Wiktionary

  1. medicinenoun

    A substance which specifically promotes healing when ingested or consumed in some way.

  2. medicinenoun

    A treatment or cure.

  3. medicinenoun

    The study of the cause, diagnosis, prognosis and treatment of disease or illness.

  4. medicinenoun

    The profession of physicians, surgeons and related specialisms; those who practice medicine.

  5. medicinenoun

    Ritual Native American magic used (notably by a medicine man) to promote a desired outcome in healing, hunting, warfare etc.

  6. medicinenoun

    black magic, superstition.

Samuel Johnson's Dictionary

  1. Medicinenoun

    Physick; any remedy administered by a physician.

    Etymology: medicine, Fr. medicina, Latin.

    O, my dear father! restauration, hang
    Thy medicine on my lips; and let this kiss
    Repair those violent harms. William Shakespeare, King Lear.

    Let’s make us medicines of our great revenge,
    To cure this deadly grief. William Shakespeare, Macbeth.

    A merry heart doth good like a medicine; but a broken spirit drieth the bones. Prov. xvii. 22.

    I wish to die, yet dare not death endure;
    Detest the med’cine, yet desire the cure. Dryden.

  2. To Medicineverb

    To operate as physick. Not used.

    Etymology: from the noun.

    Not all the drowsy syrups of the world,
    Shall ever medicine thee to that sweet sleep
    Which thou owedst yesterday. William Shakespeare.

Webster Dictionary

  1. Medicinenoun

    the science which relates to the prevention, cure, or alleviation of disease

  2. Medicinenoun

    any substance administered in the treatment of disease; a remedial agent; a remedy; physic

  3. Medicinenoun

    a philter or love potion

  4. Medicinenoun

    a physician

  5. Medicineverb

    to give medicine to; to affect as a medicine does; to remedy; to cure

  6. Etymology: [L. medicina (sc. ars), fr. medicinus medical, fr. medicus: cf. F. mdecine. See Medical.]

Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

  1. Medicine

    med′i-sin, or med′sin, n. anything applied for the cure or lessening of disease or pain, whether simple or compound (made up of more than one ingredient): the science which treats of the prevention or cure of disease: a charm.—v.t. to treat or cure by medicine.—adj. Medic′inal, relating to medicine: fitted to cure or to lessen disease or pain.—adv. Medic′inally.—ns. Med′icine-bag, a Red Indian's receptacle for charms; Med′icine-chest, a chest for keeping medicines in a ship, &c.; Med′icine-man, among savages, a witch-doctor or exorciser.—adjs. Med′ico-chirur′gical, relating to both medicine and surgery; Med′ico-lē′gal, relating to the application of medicine to questions of law. [Fr.,—L. medicinamedicus.]

U.S. National Library of Medicine

  1. Medicine

    The art and science of studying, performing research on, preventing, diagnosing, and treating disease, as well as the maintenance of health.

Suggested Resources

  1. medicine

    The medicine symbol -- In this Symbols.com article you will learn about the meaning of the medicine symbol and its characteristic.

  2. medicine

    Song lyrics by medicine -- Explore a large variety of song lyrics performed by medicine on the Lyrics.com website.

Matched Categories

British National Corpus

  1. Spoken Corpus Frequency

    Rank popularity for the word 'medicine' in Spoken Corpus Frequency: #3555

  2. Written Corpus Frequency

    Rank popularity for the word 'medicine' in Written Corpus Frequency: #3364

  3. Nouns Frequency

    Rank popularity for the word 'medicine' in Nouns Frequency: #1275

How to pronounce medicine?

How to say medicine in sign language?

Numerology

  1. Chaldean Numerology

    The numerical value of medicine in Chaldean Numerology is: 1

  2. Pythagorean Numerology

    The numerical value of medicine in Pythagorean Numerology is: 8

Examples of medicine in a Sentence

  1. Marie Budev:

    Joyce Smith said. She had a second chance at life. She knew she had the second chance and she was lucky to have that. For much of her earlier life in Massachusetts, Mellady was hobbled by a mysterious lung condition. Then, in her late 30s, she tested positive foralpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency, a genetic disorder. The inherited condition predisposes people to lung conditions like chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and the emphysema Mellady developed before her transplant. The condition is caused by a lack of a protein in the blood called alpha-1 antitrypsin, which protects the lungs from inflammation. When Melladys lungs were replaced in 2007, doctors at theCleveland Clinicsaid they were among the worst they had ever seen, functioning at 15 percent of capacity. Over the next 13 years, Mellady served as an inspiration for other patients about to undergo similar transplants, a source of support for their relatives and a wealth of information for doctors studying her condition. She ended up living more than twice as long on her new lungs as the average 6.3 years for lung transplant patients. Dr. Marie Budev, the medical director of Cleveland Clinics lung and heart-lung transplant program, oversaw Melladys care and said Marie Budev was the first person from the program who died of COVID-19 and second to test positive. In this December 2016 photo provided by Joyce Smith, Joanne Mellady and Joyce Smith dog Oscar sled down the driveway of Joyce Smith home in Washington, N.H. Mellady, who received a double lung transplant in 2007, died of the coronavirus on March 30, 2020. Joyce Smith was 67. That scared Budev because transplant recipients are seen as particularly vulnerable to the virus because of the drugs they take that suppress their immune systems, making them more susceptible to infections. Five other people who have had lungs transplanted by the clinic have been infected by the virus and one more has has died. Marie Budev said Melladys death was devastating because she had become a testament to the possibilities of how to live life to the fullest after receiving an organ transplant. Marie Budev knew this was a lease on life that Marie Budev had gotten, Marie Budev said. Mellady participated in several research projects in Boston related to Marie Budev condition and was active in groups looking for a cure for alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency and who supportedorgan donation. Marie Budev was just blooming with excitement to help others and help the field of medicine especially transplantation.

  2. Mark Bowden:

    The board adopted the rule to address what it saw as the unsafe practice of medicine, the rule did not adopt the rule to place an undue burden on women seeking to terminate their pregnancies.

  3. Stephen Leacock:

    The classics are only primitive literature. They belong to the same class as primitive machinery and primitive music and primitive medicine.

  4. Joy Buolamwini:

    Sometimes respecting people means making sure your systems are inclusive such as in the case of using AI for precision medicine, at times it means respecting people's privacy by not collecting any data, and it always means respecting the dignity of an individual.

  5. Defence Secretary Michael Fallon:

    We are doubling up our training of Ukrainian forces. We've already trained around 650. By this autumn we will have trained nearly 1,000, we've already been training in battlefield medicine, infantry skills, logistics, in tactical intelligence.

Popularity rank by frequency of use

medicine#1#1273#10000

Translations for medicine

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    • A. occasional
    • B. profound
    • C. aligned
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