What does mathematical mean?

Definitions for mathematical
ˌmæθ əˈmæt ɪ kəlmath·e·mat·i·cal

This dictionary definitions page includes all the possible meanings, example usage and translations of the word mathematical.

Princeton's WordNet

  1. mathematicaladjective

    of or pertaining to or of the nature of mathematics

    "a mathematical textbook"; "slide rules and other mathematical instruments"; "a mathematical solution to a problem"; "mathematical proof"

  2. numerical, mathematicaladjective

    relating to or having ability to think in or work with numbers

    "tests for rating numerical aptitude"; "a mathematical whiz"

  3. mathematicaladjective

    beyond question

    "a mathematical certainty"

  4. mathematicaladjective

    statistically possible though highly improbable

    "have a mathematical chance of making the playoffs"

  5. mathematicaladjective

    characterized by the exactness or precision of mathematics

    "mathematical precision"

Wiktionary

  1. mathematicaladjective

    Of, or relating to mathematics

  2. mathematicaladjective

    Possible but highly improbable

Samuel Johnson's Dictionary

  1. MATHEMATICAL, MATHEMATICKadjective

    Considered according to the doctrine of the mathematicians.

    Etymology: mathematicus, Lat.

    The East and West,
    Upon the globe, a mathematick point
    Only divides: thus happiness and misery,
    And all extremes, are still contiguous. John Denham, Sophy.

    It is as impossible for an aggregate of finites to comprehend or exhaust one infinite, as it is for the greatest number of mathematick points to amount to, or constitute a body. Boyle.

    I suppose all the particles of matter to be situated in an exact and mathematical evenness. Richard Bentley, Serm.

Wikipedia

  1. mathematical

    Mathematics is an area of knowledge that includes the topics of numbers, formulas and related structures, shapes and the spaces in which they are contained, and quantities and their changes. These topics are represented in modern mathematics with the major subdisciplines of number theory, algebra, geometry, and analysis, respectively. There is no general consensus among mathematicians about a common definition for their academic discipline. Most mathematical activity involves the discovery of properties of abstract objects and the use of pure reason to prove them. These objects consist of either abstractions from nature or—in modern mathematics—entities that are stipulated to have certain properties, called axioms. A proof consists of a succession of applications of deductive rules to already established results. These results include previously proved theorems, axioms, and—in case of abstraction from nature—some basic properties that are considered true starting points of the theory under consideration.Mathematics is essential in the natural sciences, engineering, medicine, finance, computer science and the social sciences. Although mathematics is extensively used for modeling phenomena, the fundamental truths of mathematics are independent from any scientific experimentation. Some areas of mathematics, such as statistics and game theory, are developed in close correlation with their applications and are often grouped under applied mathematics. Other areas are developed independently from any application (and are therefore called pure mathematics), but often later find practical applications. The problem of integer factorization, for example, which goes back to Euclid in 300 BC, had no practical application before its use in the RSA cryptosystem, now widely used for the security of computer networks. Historically, the concept of a proof and its associated mathematical rigour first appeared in Greek mathematics, most notably in Euclid's Elements. Since its beginning, mathematics was essentially divided into geometry and arithmetic (the manipulation of natural numbers and fractions), until the 16th and 17th centuries, when algebra and infinitesimal calculus were introduced as new areas. Since then, the interaction between mathematical innovations and scientific discoveries has led to a rapid lockstep increase in the development of both. At the end of the 19th century, the foundational crisis of mathematics led to the systematization of the axiomatic method, which heralded a dramatic increase in the number of mathematical areas and their fields of application. The contemporary Mathematics Subject Classification lists more than 60 first-level areas of mathematics.

ChatGPT

  1. mathematical

    Mathematical refers to anything related to, involving, or characterized by mathematics. It often describes principles, concepts, methods, or techniques that are derived from or using mathematics. It can also describe any process that follows a logical or quantitative approach similar to that utilized in mathematics.

Webster Dictionary

  1. Mathematicaladjective

    of or pertaining to mathematics; according to mathematics; hence, theoretically precise; accurate; as, mathematical geography; mathematical instruments; mathematical exactness

  2. Etymology: [See Mathematic.]

Editors Contribution

  1. mathematical

    Relating to mathematics.

    The mathematical process was easy and simple.


    Submitted by MaryC on March 7, 2020  

Matched Categories

British National Corpus

  1. Adjectives Frequency

    Rank popularity for the word 'mathematical' in Adjectives Frequency: #878

How to pronounce mathematical?

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Numerology

  1. Chaldean Numerology

    The numerical value of mathematical in Chaldean Numerology is: 9

  2. Pythagorean Numerology

    The numerical value of mathematical in Pythagorean Numerology is: 7

Examples of mathematical in a Sentence

  1. Albert Einstein:

    God does not care about our mathematical difficulties. He integrates empirically.

  2. Christian Yates:

    What we've been able to tease out from the mathematical model is it's not necessarily that these cells are migrating in a directed way, actually these cells are diffusing, there's no direction to their migration. It's like when you put a drop of milk into a cup of coffee that you haven't stirred. Eventually that milk will be spread evenly throughout your coffee, and these cells are doing the same sort of thing - they're moving in an undirected manner and eventually, slowly, they manage to fully colonize the skin of this animal.

  3. Arthur Koestler:

    Nobody before the Pythagorean had thought that mathematical relations held the secret of the universe. Twenty-five centuries later, Europe is still blessed and cursed with their heritage. To non-European civilizations, the idea that numbers are the key to both wisdom and power, seems never to have occurred.

  4. Bonner Cohen:

    This is a man-made disaster, southern California is an arid part of the world where droughts -- even severe droughts -- are commonplace, and knowing this, you’d think the government of California would have included this mathematical certainty in its disaster preparedness planning, but the government has done nothing, not even store rain, as the population has continued to grow.

  5. David Martin:

    Child support in Alaska is calculated based on a mathematical formula in the Civil Rules. The parties are not allowed to use a different formula or forgive or excuse nonpayment, they are also not allowed to demand or accelerate payments. The court is charged with figuring out the amount of past child support as well as the future child support obligations.

Popularity rank by frequency of use

mathematical#1#5753#10000

Translations for mathematical

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"mathematical." Definitions.net. STANDS4 LLC, 2024. Web. 5 Mar. 2024. <https://www.definitions.net/definition/mathematical>.

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