What does mantle mean?

Definitions for mantle
ˈmæn tlman·tle

Here are all the possible meanings and translations of the word mantle.

Princeton's WordNet

  1. mantlenoun

    the cloak as a symbol of authority

    "place the mantle of authority on younger shoulders"

  2. Mantle, Mickey Mantle, Mickey Charles Mantlenoun

    United States baseball player (1931-1997)

  3. mantlenoun

    the layer of the earth between the crust and the core

  4. blanket, mantlenoun

    anything that covers

    "there was a blanket of snow"

  5. mantle, palliumnoun

    (zoology) a protective layer of epidermis in mollusks or brachiopods that secretes a substance forming the shell

  6. mantel, mantelpiece, mantle, mantlepiece, chimneypiecenoun

    shelf that projects from wall above fireplace

    "in Britain they call a mantel a chimneypiece"

  7. curtain, drape, drapery, mantle, pallnoun

    hanging cloth used as a blind (especially for a window)

  8. cape, mantleverb

    a sleeveless garment like a cloak but shorter

  9. mantleverb

    spread over a surface, like a mantle

  10. mantleverb

    cover like a mantle

    "The ivy mantles the building"

GCIDE

  1. mantlenoun

    (Geol.) The highly viscous shell of hot semisolid rock, about 1800 miles thick, lying under the crust of the Earth and above the core. Also, by analogy, a similar shell on any other planet.

    Etymology: [OE. mantel, OF. mantel, F. manteau, fr. L. mantellum, mantelum, a cloth, napkin, cloak, mantle (cf. mantele, mantile, towel, napkin); prob. from manus hand + the root of tela cloth. See Manual, Textile, and cf. Mandil, Mantel, Mantilla.]

Wiktionary

  1. mantlenoun

    A piece of clothing somewhat like an open robe or cloak, especially that worn by Orthodox bishops.

    Etymology: mentel, later reborrowed from mantel, both from mantellum, diminutive of mantum, probably from Gaulish.

  2. mantlenoun

    Anything that covers or conceals something else.

    Etymology: mentel, later reborrowed from mantel, both from mantellum, diminutive of mantum, probably from Gaulish.

  3. mantlenoun

    The body wall of a mollusc, from which the shell is secreted.

    Etymology: mentel, later reborrowed from mantel, both from mantellum, diminutive of mantum, probably from Gaulish.

  4. mantlenoun

    The zone of hot gases around a flame; the gauzy incandescent covering of a gas lamp.

    Etymology: mentel, later reborrowed from mantel, both from mantellum, diminutive of mantum, probably from Gaulish.

  5. mantlenoun

    The cerebral cortex.

    Etymology: mentel, later reborrowed from mantel, both from mantellum, diminutive of mantum, probably from Gaulish.

  6. mantlenoun

    The layer between the Earth's core and crust.

    Etymology: mentel, later reborrowed from mantel, both from mantellum, diminutive of mantum, probably from Gaulish.

  7. mantlenoun

    A fireplace shelf;

    Etymology: mentel, later reborrowed from mantel, both from mantellum, diminutive of mantum, probably from Gaulish.

  8. mantleverb

    To cover or conceal (something).

    Etymology: mentel, later reborrowed from mantel, both from mantellum, diminutive of mantum, probably from Gaulish.

  9. mantleverb

    To become covered or concealed.

    Etymology: mentel, later reborrowed from mantel, both from mantellum, diminutive of mantum, probably from Gaulish.

Webster Dictionary

  1. Mantlenoun

    a loose garment to be worn over other garments; an enveloping robe; a cloak. Hence, figuratively, a covering or concealing envelope

    Etymology: [OE. mantel, OF. mantel, F. manteau, fr. L. mantellum, mantelum, a cloth, napkin, cloak, mantle (cf. mantele, mantile, towel, napkin); prob. from manus hand + the root of tela cloth. See Manual, Textile, and cf. Mandil, Mantel, Mantilla.]

  2. Mantlenoun

    same as Mantling

    Etymology: [OE. mantel, OF. mantel, F. manteau, fr. L. mantellum, mantelum, a cloth, napkin, cloak, mantle (cf. mantele, mantile, towel, napkin); prob. from manus hand + the root of tela cloth. See Manual, Textile, and cf. Mandil, Mantel, Mantilla.]

  3. Mantlenoun

    the external fold, or folds, of the soft, exterior membrane of the body of a mollusk. It usually forms a cavity inclosing the gills. See Illusts. of Buccinum, and Byssus

    Etymology: [OE. mantel, OF. mantel, F. manteau, fr. L. mantellum, mantelum, a cloth, napkin, cloak, mantle (cf. mantele, mantile, towel, napkin); prob. from manus hand + the root of tela cloth. See Manual, Textile, and cf. Mandil, Mantel, Mantilla.]

  4. Mantlenoun

    any free, outer membrane

    Etymology: [OE. mantel, OF. mantel, F. manteau, fr. L. mantellum, mantelum, a cloth, napkin, cloak, mantle (cf. mantele, mantile, towel, napkin); prob. from manus hand + the root of tela cloth. See Manual, Textile, and cf. Mandil, Mantel, Mantilla.]

  5. Mantlenoun

    the back of a bird together with the folded wings

    Etymology: [OE. mantel, OF. mantel, F. manteau, fr. L. mantellum, mantelum, a cloth, napkin, cloak, mantle (cf. mantele, mantile, towel, napkin); prob. from manus hand + the root of tela cloth. See Manual, Textile, and cf. Mandil, Mantel, Mantilla.]

  6. Mantlenoun

    a mantel. See Mantel

    Etymology: [OE. mantel, OF. mantel, F. manteau, fr. L. mantellum, mantelum, a cloth, napkin, cloak, mantle (cf. mantele, mantile, towel, napkin); prob. from manus hand + the root of tela cloth. See Manual, Textile, and cf. Mandil, Mantel, Mantilla.]

  7. Mantlenoun

    the outer wall and casing of a blast furnace, above the hearth

    Etymology: [OE. mantel, OF. mantel, F. manteau, fr. L. mantellum, mantelum, a cloth, napkin, cloak, mantle (cf. mantele, mantile, towel, napkin); prob. from manus hand + the root of tela cloth. See Manual, Textile, and cf. Mandil, Mantel, Mantilla.]

  8. Mantlenoun

    a penstock for a water wheel

    Etymology: [OE. mantel, OF. mantel, F. manteau, fr. L. mantellum, mantelum, a cloth, napkin, cloak, mantle (cf. mantele, mantile, towel, napkin); prob. from manus hand + the root of tela cloth. See Manual, Textile, and cf. Mandil, Mantel, Mantilla.]

  9. Mantleverb

    to cover or envelop, as with a mantle; to cloak; to hide; to disguise

    Etymology: [OE. mantel, OF. mantel, F. manteau, fr. L. mantellum, mantelum, a cloth, napkin, cloak, mantle (cf. mantele, mantile, towel, napkin); prob. from manus hand + the root of tela cloth. See Manual, Textile, and cf. Mandil, Mantel, Mantilla.]

  10. Mantleverb

    to unfold and spread out the wings, like a mantle; -- said of hawks. Also used figuratively

    Etymology: [OE. mantel, OF. mantel, F. manteau, fr. L. mantellum, mantelum, a cloth, napkin, cloak, mantle (cf. mantele, mantile, towel, napkin); prob. from manus hand + the root of tela cloth. See Manual, Textile, and cf. Mandil, Mantel, Mantilla.]

  11. Mantleverb

    to spread out; -- said of wings

    Etymology: [OE. mantel, OF. mantel, F. manteau, fr. L. mantellum, mantelum, a cloth, napkin, cloak, mantle (cf. mantele, mantile, towel, napkin); prob. from manus hand + the root of tela cloth. See Manual, Textile, and cf. Mandil, Mantel, Mantilla.]

  12. Mantleverb

    to spread over the surface as a covering; to overspread; as, the scum mantled on the pool

    Etymology: [OE. mantel, OF. mantel, F. manteau, fr. L. mantellum, mantelum, a cloth, napkin, cloak, mantle (cf. mantele, mantile, towel, napkin); prob. from manus hand + the root of tela cloth. See Manual, Textile, and cf. Mandil, Mantel, Mantilla.]

  13. Mantleverb

    to gather, assume, or take on, a covering, as froth, scum, etc

    Etymology: [OE. mantel, OF. mantel, F. manteau, fr. L. mantellum, mantelum, a cloth, napkin, cloak, mantle (cf. mantele, mantile, towel, napkin); prob. from manus hand + the root of tela cloth. See Manual, Textile, and cf. Mandil, Mantel, Mantilla.]

Freebase

  1. Mantle

    A mantle is an ecclesiastical garment in the form of a very full cape which extends to the floor, joined at the neck, that is worn over the outer garments. In the Eastern Orthodox Church and the Eastern Catholic churches, the mantle is a monastic garment worn by bishops, hegumens, archimandrites, and other monastics in processions and while attending various church services, such as Vespers or Matins; but not when vested to celebrate the Divine Liturgy. Unlike the Western cope, the mantle is worn only by monastics. The klobuk is worn over the mantle.

Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

  1. Mantle

    man′tl, n. a covering: a cloak or loose outer garment: spirit: (zool.) the thin fleshy membrane lining a mollusc's shell: a conical wire-network covered with some highly refractory earth that becomes luminous under a flame.—v.t. to cover: to disguise.—v.i. to spread like a mantle: to revel: to joy: to froth: to rush to the face and impart a crimson glow, as blood.—ns. Man′tlet, Man′telet, a small cloak for women: (fort.) a movable shield or screen to protect an attacking force, or gunners while serving their guns; Man′tling, cloth suitable for mantles: (her.) the representation of a mantle, or the drapery of a coat-of-arms. [O. Fr. mantel (Fr. manteau)—L. mantellum, a napkin.]

Military Dictionary and Gazetteer

  1. mantle

    A long flowing robe, worn in the Middle Ages over the armor, and fastened by a fibula in front, or at the right shoulder. The mantle is an important part of the official insignia of the various orders of knighthood.

Anagrams for mantle »

  1. mental

  2. malent

  3. mantel

  4. lament, Lament.

  5. Lament

  6. Lament.

How to pronounce mantle?

How to say mantle in sign language?

Numerology

  1. Chaldean Numerology

    The numerical value of mantle in Chaldean Numerology is: 4

  2. Pythagorean Numerology

    The numerical value of mantle in Pythagorean Numerology is: 2

Examples of mantle in a Sentence

  1. Mysteries Coltice:

    Convection models were good for the mantle, but not plates, and plate tectonics was good for plates but not the mantle, and the whole story behind the evolution of the system is the feedback between the two.

  2. Sami Mikhail:

    [The source] could be just a really, really old formation that's been down in the mantle for a long time.

  3. Manufacturers President Jay Timmons:

    I think it's important to note that there are countries all over the world, China included, that would like to take away America's mantle of economic leadership.

  4. Natsue Abe:

    The second aim is we want to investigate the boundary between the oceanic crust and the mantle, the third one is we want to know how the oceanic crust formed.

  5. Will Ferrell:

    Ruth, Musial, Mantle, Will Ferrell, who would have thought that one day those names would be synonymous? Show of hands -- scratch that, never mind.

Images & Illustrations of mantle

  1. mantlemantlemantlemantlemantle

Popularity rank by frequency of use

mantle#10000#16528#100000

Translations for mantle

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    one of four connected cavities in the brain; is continuous with the central canal of the spinal cord and contains cerebrospinal fluid
    • A. ventricle
    • B. calcaneus
    • C. swathing
    • D. swag

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