What does mandolin mean?

Definitions for mandolin
ˈmæn dl ɪn, ˌmæn dlˈɪnman·dolin

This dictionary definitions page includes all the possible meanings, example usage and translations of the word mandolin.

Princeton's WordNet

  1. mandolinnoun

    a stringed instrument related to the lute, usually played with a plectrum

Wiktionary

  1. mandolinnoun

    A stringed instrument and a member of the lute family, having eight strings in four courses, frequently tuned as a violin. They have either a bowl back or a flat back.

  2. mandolinnoun

    A kitchen tool used for slicing vegetables (usually spelled mandoline).

  3. mandolinnoun

    An RAF World War II code name for patrols to attack enemy railway transport.

  4. Etymology: From mandoline, from mandolino, diminutive of mandola, a large stringed instrument.

Wikipedia

  1. Mandolin

    A mandolin (Italian: mandolino pronounced [mandoˈliːno]; literally "small mandola") is a stringed musical instrument in the lute family and is generally plucked with a pick. It most commonly has four courses of doubled metal strings tuned in unison, thus giving a total of 8 strings, although five (10 strings) and six (12 strings) course versions also exist. The courses are typically tuned in an interval of perfect fifths, with the same tuning as a violin (G3, D4, A4, E5). Also, like the violin, it is the soprano member of a family that includes the mandola, octave mandolin, mandocello and mandobass. There are many styles of mandolin, but the three most common types are the Neapolitan or round-backed mandolin, the archtop mandolin and the flat-backed mandolin. The round-backed version has a deep bottom, constructed of strips of wood, glued together into a bowl. The archtop, also known as the carved-top mandolin has an arched top and a shallower, arched back both carved out of wood. The flat-backed mandolin uses thin sheets of wood for the body, braced on the inside for strength in a similar manner to a guitar. Each style of instrument has its own sound quality and is associated with particular forms of music. Neapolitan mandolins feature prominently in European classical music and traditional music. Archtop instruments are common in American folk music and bluegrass music. Flat-backed instruments are commonly used in Irish, British, and Brazilian folk music, and Mexican estudiantinas. Other mandolin varieties differ primarily in the number of strings and include four-string models (tuned in fifths) such as the Brescian and Cremonese, six-string types (tuned in fourths) such as the Milanese, Lombard and the Sicilian and 6 course instruments of 12 strings (two strings per course) such as the Genoese. There has also been a twelve-string (three strings per course) type and an instrument with sixteen strings (four strings per course). Much of mandolin development revolved around the soundboard (the top). Early instruments were quiet, strung with gut strings, and plucked with the fingers or with a quill. However, modern instruments are louder, using metal strings, which exert more pressure than the gut strings. The modern soundboard is designed to withstand the pressure of metal strings that would break earlier instruments. The soundboard comes in many shapes—but generally round or teardrop-shaped, sometimes with scrolls or other projections. There are usually one or more sound holes in the soundboard, either round, oval, or shaped like a calligraphic f (f-hole). A round or oval sound hole may be covered or bordered with decorative rosettes or purfling.

ChatGPT

  1. mandolin

    A mandolin is a stringed musical instrument in the lute family, usually with four courses of doubled strings (eight strings in total), that is played with a plectrum. It is typically pear-shaped with a hollow wooden body and originated in Italy in the 18th century. It's known for its high, bright sound and is used in various types of music including classical, bluegrass, and folk.

Webster Dictionary

  1. Mandolinnoun

    alt. of Mandoline

Wikidata

  1. mandolin

    , A mandolin is a musical instrument in the lute family. It descends from the mandore, a soprano member of the lute family. The mandolin soundboard comes in many shapes—but generally round or teardrop-shaped, sometimes with scrolls or other projections. A mandolin may have f-holes, or a single round or oval sound hole. A round or oval sound hole may be bordered with decorative rosettes or purfling. Early mandolins had six double courses of gut strings, tuned similarly to lutes, and plucked with the fingertips. Modern mandolins, which originated in Naples, Italy, in the late 18th century, commonly have four double courses of metal strings, which are plucked with a plectrum. Many variants of the mandolin have existed. These include Milanese, Lombard, Brescian and other six-course types, as well as four-string, twelve-string, and sixteen-string.

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Numerology

  1. Chaldean Numerology

    The numerical value of mandolin in Chaldean Numerology is: 3

  2. Pythagorean Numerology

    The numerical value of mandolin in Pythagorean Numerology is: 1

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Translations for mandolin

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"mandolin." Definitions.net. STANDS4 LLC, 2024. Web. 13 Jun 2024. <https://www.definitions.net/definition/mandolin>.

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