What does learning mean?

Definitions for learning
ˈlɜr nɪŋlearn·ing

This dictionary definitions page includes all the possible meanings, example usage and translations of the word learning.

Princeton's WordNet

  1. learning, acquisitionnoun

    the cognitive process of acquiring skill or knowledge

    "the child's acquisition of language"

  2. eruditeness, erudition, learnedness, learning, scholarship, encyclopedism, encyclopaedismnoun

    profound scholarly knowledge

Wiktionary

  1. learningnoun

    An act in which something is learned.

    Learning to ride a unicycle sounds exciting.

  2. learningnoun

    Accumulated knowledge.

    The department head was also a scholar of great learning.

  3. learningnoun

    Something that has been learned

Samuel Johnson's Dictionary

  1. Learningnoun

    Etymology: from learn.

    Learning hath its infancy, when it is almost childish; then its youth, when luxuriant and juvenile; then its strength of years, when solid; and, lastly, its old age, when dry and exhaust. Francis Bacon, Essays.

    To tongue or pudding thou hast no pretence,
    Learning thy talent is, but mine is sense. Matthew Prior.

    As Moses was learned in all the wisdom of the Egyptians, so it is manifest from this chapter, that St. Paul was a great master in all the learning of the Greeks. Richard Bentley, Sermons.

    An art of contradiction by way of scorn, a learning wherewith we were long sithence forewarned, that the miserable times whereunto we are fallen should abound. Richard Hooker.

Wikipedia

  1. Learning

    Learning is the process of acquiring new understanding, knowledge, behaviors, skills, values, attitudes, and preferences. The ability to learn is possessed by humans, animals, and some machines; there is also evidence for some kind of learning in certain plants. Some learning is immediate, induced by a single event (e.g. being burned by a hot stove), but much skill and knowledge accumulate from repeated experiences. The changes induced by learning often last a lifetime, and it is hard to distinguish learned material that seems to be "lost" from that which cannot be retrieved.Human learning starts at birth (it might even start before in terms of an embryo's need for both interaction with, and freedom within its environment within the womb.) and continues until death as a consequence of ongoing interactions between people and their environment. The nature and processes involved in learning are studied in many established fields (including educational psychology, neuropsychology, experimental psychology, cognitive sciences, and pedagogy), as well as emerging fields of knowledge (e.g. with a shared interest in the topic of learning from safety events such as incidents/accidents, or in collaborative learning health systems). Research in such fields has led to the identification of various sorts of learning. For example, learning may occur as a result of habituation, or classical conditioning, operant conditioning or as a result of more complex activities such as play, seen only in relatively intelligent animals. Learning may occur consciously or without conscious awareness. Learning that an aversive event cannot be avoided or escaped may result in a condition called learned helplessness. There is evidence for human behavioral learning prenatally, in which habituation has been observed as early as 32 weeks into gestation, indicating that the central nervous system is sufficiently developed and primed for learning and memory to occur very early on in development.Play has been approached by several theorists as a form of learning. Children experiment with the world, learn the rules, and learn to interact through play. Lev Vygotsky agrees that play is pivotal for children's development, since they make meaning of their environment through playing educational games. For Vygotsky, however, play is the first form of learning language and communication, and the stage where a child begins to understand rules and symbols. This has led to a view that learning in organisms is always related to semiosis, and often associated with representational systems/activity.

ChatGPT

  1. learning

    Learning refers to the acquisition of knowledge, skills, attitudes, or behaviors through study, experience, or teaching. It is a process by which individuals gain new information, develop understanding or enhance their abilities in a specific subject or area. Learning can take place in various settings such as formal education systems, workplaces, social interactions, or self-directed efforts. It involves cognitive processes such as understanding, remembering, applying, analyzing, evaluating, and creating concepts or ideas. Learning is a fundamental aspect of personal growth, professional development, and the acquisition of expertise.

Webster Dictionary

  1. Learning

    of Learn

  2. Learningnoun

    the acquisition of knowledge or skill; as, the learning of languages; the learning of telegraphy

  3. Learningnoun

    the knowledge or skill received by instruction or study; acquired knowledge or ideas in any branch of science or literature; erudition; literature; science; as, he is a man of great learning

Wikidata

  1. Learning

    Learning is acquiring new, or modifying and reinforcing existing, knowledge, behaviors, skills, values, or preferences and may involve synthesizing different types of information. The ability to learn is possessed by humans, animals and some machines. Progress over time tends to follow learning curves. Learning is not compulsory; it is contextual. It does not happen all at once, but builds upon and is shaped by what we already know. To that end, learning may be viewed as a process, rather than a collection of factual and procedural knowledge. Learning produces changes in the organism and the changes produced are relatively permanent. Human learning may occur as part of education, personal development, schooling, or training. It may be goal-oriented and may be aided by motivation. The study of how learning occurs is part of neuropsychology, educational psychology, learning theory, and pedagogy. Learning may occur as a result of habituation or classical conditioning, seen in many animal species, or as a result of more complex activities such as play, seen only in relatively intelligent animals. Learning may occur consciously or without conscious awareness. Learning that an aversive event can't be avoided nor escaped is called learned helplessness. There is evidence for human behavioral learning prenatally, in which habituation has been observed as early as 32 weeks into gestation, indicating that the central nervous system is sufficiently developed and primed for learning and memory to occur very early on in development.

U.S. National Library of Medicine

  1. Learning

    Relatively permanent change in behavior that is the result of past experience or practice. The concept includes the acquisition of knowledge.

Editors Contribution

  1. learning

    To learn, feel, know and understand intuitively.

    They knew their learning would contribute to the forward movement and they both looked forward to their wedding day together.


    Submitted by MaryC on February 29, 2020  

British National Corpus

  1. Spoken Corpus Frequency

    Rank popularity for the word 'learning' in Spoken Corpus Frequency: #1875

  2. Written Corpus Frequency

    Rank popularity for the word 'learning' in Written Corpus Frequency: #2466

  3. Nouns Frequency

    Rank popularity for the word 'learning' in Nouns Frequency: #858

How to pronounce learning?

How to say learning in sign language?

Numerology

  1. Chaldean Numerology

    The numerical value of learning in Chaldean Numerology is: 7

  2. Pythagorean Numerology

    The numerical value of learning in Pythagorean Numerology is: 8

Examples of learning in a Sentence

  1. Lord Chesterfield:

    Learning is acquired by reading books, but the much more necessary learning, the knowledge of the world, is only to be acquired by reading men, and studying all the various facets of them.

  2. Alice Koller:

    It takes a very long time to learn that a courtroom is the last place in the world for learning the truth.

  3. John Calvin:

    Without Christ, sciences in every department are vain....The man who knows not God is vain, though he should be conversant with every branch of learning. Nay more, we may affirm this too with truth, that these choice gifts of God -- expertness of mind, acuteness of judgment, liberal sciences, and acquaintance with languages, are in a manner profaned in every instance in which they fall to the lot of wicked men.

  4. Therapist Winifred Reilly:

    Our culture glorifies togetherness, we think a happy marriage is about being great together, but it’s about learning to be with someone different, growing up and learning what’s important to you.

  5. Stephen Vizinczey:

    Strange as it seems, no amount of learning can cure stupidity, and formal education positively fortifies it.

Popularity rank by frequency of use

learning#1#670#10000

Translations for learning

From our Multilingual Translation Dictionary

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"learning." Definitions.net. STANDS4 LLC, 2024. Web. 21 Apr. 2024. <https://www.definitions.net/definition/learning>.

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