What does lead mean?

Definitions for lead
lɛdlead

This dictionary definitions page includes all the possible meanings, example usage and translations of the word lead.

Princeton's WordNet

  1. leadnoun

    an advantage held by a competitor in a race

    "he took the lead at the last turn"

  2. lead, Pb, atomic number 82noun

    a soft heavy toxic malleable metallic element; bluish white when freshly cut but tarnishes readily to dull grey

    "the children were playing with lead soldiers"

  3. lead, track, trailnoun

    evidence pointing to a possible solution

    "the police are following a promising lead"; "the trail led straight to the perpetrator"

  4. leadnoun

    a position of leadership (especially in the phrase `take the lead')

    "he takes the lead in any group"; "we were just waiting for someone to take the lead"; "they didn't follow our lead"

  5. leadnoun

    the angle between the direction a gun is aimed and the position of a moving target (correcting for the flight time of the missile)

  6. lead, lead-in, ledenoun

    the introductory section of a story

    "it was an amusing lead-in to a very serious matter"

  7. leadnoun

    (sports) the score by which a team or individual is winning

  8. star, principal, leadnoun

    an actor who plays a principal role

  9. leadnoun

    (baseball) the position taken by a base runner preparing to advance to the next base

    "he took a long lead off first"

  10. tip, lead, steer, confidential information, wind, hintnoun

    an indication of potential opportunity

    "he got a tip on the stock market"; "a good lead for a job"

  11. lead, lead storynoun

    a news story of major importance

  12. spark advance, leadnoun

    the timing of ignition relative to the position of the piston in an internal-combustion engine

  13. leash, tether, leadnoun

    restraint consisting of a rope (or light chain) used to restrain an animal

  14. lead, leadingnoun

    thin strip of metal used to separate lines of type in printing

  15. lead, pencil leadnoun

    mixture of graphite with clay in different degrees of hardness; the marking substance in a pencil

  16. jumper cable, jumper lead, lead, booster cablenoun

    a jumper that consists of a short piece of wire

    "it was a tangle of jumper cables and clip leads"

  17. leadverb

    the playing of a card to start a trick in bridge

    "the lead was in the dummy"

  18. lead, take, direct, conduct, guideverb

    take somebody somewhere

    "We lead him to our chief"; "can you take me to the main entrance?"; "He conducted us to the palace"

  19. leave, result, leadverb

    have as a result or residue

    "The water left a mark on the silk dress"; "Her blood left a stain on the napkin"

  20. leadverb

    tend to or result in

    "This remark lead to further arguments among the guests"

  21. lead, headverb

    travel in front of; go in advance of others

    "The procession was headed by John"

  22. leadverb

    cause to undertake a certain action

    "Her greed led her to forge the checks"

  23. run, go, pass, lead, extendverb

    stretch out over a distance, space, time, or scope; run or extend between two points or beyond a certain point

    "Service runs all the way to Cranbury"; "His knowledge doesn't go very far"; "My memory extends back to my fourth year of life"; "The facts extend beyond a consideration of her personal assets"

  24. head, leadverb

    be in charge of

    "Who is heading this project?"

  25. lead, topverb

    be ahead of others; be the first

    "she topped her class every year"

  26. contribute, lead, conduceverb

    be conducive to

    "The use of computers in the classroom lead to better writing"

  27. conduct, lead, directverb

    lead, as in the performance of a composition

    "conduct an orchestra; Barenboim conducted the Chicago symphony for years"

  28. go, leadverb

    lead, extend, or afford access

    "This door goes to the basement"; "The road runs South"

  29. precede, leadverb

    move ahead (of others) in time or space

  30. run, leadverb

    cause something to pass or lead somewhere

    "Run the wire behind the cabinet"

  31. moderate, chair, leadverb

    preside over

    "John moderated the discussion"

GCIDE

  1. Leadnoun

    The first story in a newspaper or broadcast news program.

  2. Leadnoun

    an electrical conductor, typically as an insulated wire or cable, connecting an electrical device to another device or to a power source, such as a conductor conveying electricity from a dynamo.

  3. Leadnoun

    (Baseball) the distance a runner on base advances from one base toward the next before the pitch; as, the long lead he usually takes tends to distract the pitchers.

Wiktionary

  1. leadnoun

    The act of leading or conducting; guidance; direction, course; as, to take the lead; to be under the lead of another.

  2. leadnoun

    Precedence; advance position; also, the measure of precedence; as, the white horse had the lead; a lead of a boat's length, or of half a second; the state of being ahead in a race; the highest score in a game in an incomplete game.

  3. lead

    a metallic wire for electrical devices and equipments

  4. lead

    When a runner steps away from a base while waiting for the pitch to be thrown

    The runner took his lead from first.

  5. lead

    (cards and dominoes) The act or right of playing first in a game or round; the card suit, or piece, so played; as, your partner has the lead.

  6. lead

    A channel of open water in an ice field.

  7. lead

    A lode.

  8. lead

    The course of a rope from end to end.

  9. lead

    A rope, leather strap, or similar device with which to lead an animal; a leash

  10. leadverb

    To guide or conduct with the hand, or by means of some physical contact connection; as, a father leads a child; a jockey leads a horse with a halter; a dog leads a blind man.

  11. leadverb

    To guide or conduct in a certain course, or to a certain place or end, by making the way known; to show the way, especially by going with or going in advance of, to lead a pupil; to guide somebody somewhere or to bring somebody somewhere by means of instructions. Hence, figuratively: To direct; to counsel; to instruct; as, to lead a traveler.

  12. lead

    To conduct or direct with authority; to have direction or charge of; as, to lead an army, an exploring party, or a search; to lead a political party; to command, especially a military or business unit

  13. lead

    To go or to be in advance of; to precede; hence, to be foremost or chief among; as, the big sloop led the fleet of yachts; the Guards led the attack; Demosthenes leads the orators of all ages.

  14. lead

    To draw or direct by influence, whether good or bad; to prevail on; to induce; to entice; to allure; as, to lead one to espouse a righteous cause.

    The evidence leads me to believe he is guilty.

  15. lead

    To guide or conduct oneself in, through, or along (a certain course); hence, to proceed in the way of; to follow the path or course of; to pass; to spend. Also, to cause (one) to proceed or follow in (a certain course).

  16. lead

    To begin a game, round, or trick, with; as, to lead trumps

    He led a double five.

  17. lead

    To guide or conduct, as by accompanying, going before, showing, influencing, directing with authority, etc.; to have precedence or preeminence; to be first or chief; used in most of the senses of the transitive verb.

  18. lead

    To be ahead of others, e.g., in a race

  19. lead

    In a steam engine, The width of port opening which is uncovered by the valve, for the admission or release of steam, at the instant when the piston is at end of its stroke.

  20. lead

    charging lead

  21. lead

    The distance of haul, as from a cutting to an embankment.

  22. lead

    The action of a tooth, as a tooth of a wheel, in impelling another tooth or a pallet. Claudias Saunier

  23. lead

    Hypothesis that has not been pursued

    The investigation stalled when all leads turned out to be dead ends.

  24. lead

    Information obtained by a detective or police officer that allows him or her to discover further details about a crime or incident.

  25. lead

    Potential opportunity for a sale or transaction, a potential customer.

    Joe is a great addition to our sales team, he has numerous leads in the paper industry.

  26. lead

    Information obtained by a news reporter about an issue or subject that allows him or her to discover more details.

  27. lead

    The player who throws the first two rocks for a team.

  28. lead

    A teaser; a lead in; the start of a newspaper column, telling who, what, when, where, why and how. (Sometimes spelled as lede for this usage to avoid ambiguity.)

  29. lead

    An important news story that appears on the front page of a newspaper or at the beginning of a news broadcast

  30. lead

    The axial distance a screw thread travels in one revolution. It is equal to the pitch times the number of starts.

  31. lead

    In a barbershop quartet, the person who sings the melody, usually the second tenor

  32. lead

    To have the highest interim score in a game

  33. lead

    To be more advanced in technology or business than others

  34. lead

    To tend or reach in a certain direction, or to a certain place; as, the path leads to the mill; gambling leads to other vices.

  35. lead

    To lead off or out, to go first; to begin.

  36. lead

    To produce.

    The shock led to a change in his behaviour.

  37. lead

    To step off base and move towards the next base.

    The batter always leads off base.

  38. lead

    To aim in front of a moving target, in order that the shot may hit the target as it passes.

  39. leadadjective

    Foremost.

    The contestants are all tied; no one has the lead position.

  40. Etymology: From leed, from lead, from laudan, from lAudh-. Cognate with leid, lede, lud, luad, lead, lood, Lot, lod, lóð, luaidhe, liudē.

Samuel Johnson's Dictionary

  1. LEADnoun

    1.Lead is the heaviest metal except gold; for, though it is considerably lighter than quicksilver, as this wants malleability, it ought not to be reckoned in the class of metals. Lead is the softest of all the metals, and very ductile, though less so than gold: it is very little subject to rust, and the least sonorous of all the metals except gold. The specifick gravity of lead is to that of water as 11322 to1000. Lead, when kept in fusion over a common fire, throws up all other bodies, except gold, that are mixed, all others being lighter, except Mercury, which will not bear that degree of heat: it afterwards vitrifies with the baser metals, and carries them off, in form of scoriæ, to the sides of the vessel. The weakest acids are the best solvents for lead: it dissolves very readily in aqua fortis diluted with water, as also in vinegar. Gold, or silver, or copper, become brittle on being mixed with lead in fusion; and, if lead and tin be melted together, the tin is thrown up to the surface in little dusty globes. Lead is found in various countries, but abounds particularly in England, in several kinds of soils and stones. The smoke of the lead works at Mendip in Somersetshire is a prodigious annoyance, and subjects both the workmen, and the cattle that graze about them, to a mortal disease; trees that grow near them have their tops burnt, and their leaves and outsides discoloured and scorched. Hill.

    Etymology: læd , Saxon.

    Thou art a soul in bliss, but I am bound
    Upon a wheel of fire; that mine own tears
    Do scald like molten lead. William Shakespeare, King Lear.

    Of lead, some I can shew you so like steel, and so unlike common lead ore, that the workmen call it steel ore. Boyle.

    Lead is employed for the refining of gold and silver by the cupel; hereof is made common ceruss with vinegar; of ceruss, red lead; of plumbum ustum, the best yellow ochre; of lead, and half as much tin, solder for lead. Nehemiah Grew.

    Stalls, bulks, windows,
    Are smother’d up, leads fill’d, and ridges hors’d
    With variable complexions; all agreeing
    In earnestness to see him. William Shakespeare, Coriolanus.

    I would have the tower two stories, and goodly leads upon the top, raised with statues interposed. Francis Bacon.

  2. Leadnoun

    Guidance; first place: a low despicable word.

    Etymology: læd , Saxon.

    Yorkshire takes the lead of the other countries. Thomas Herring.

  3. To Leadverb

    To fit with lead in any manner.

    Etymology: from the noun.

    He fashioneth the clay with his arm, he applieth himself to lead it over; and he is diligent to make clean the furnace. Ecclus. xxxviii. 30.

    There is a traverse placed in a loft, at the right hand of the chair, with a privy door, and a carved window of glass leaded with gold and blue, where the mother sitteth. Francis Bacon.

  4. To Leadverb

    preter. I led.

    Etymology: from the noun.

    There is a cliff, whose high and bending head
    Looks fearfully on the confined deep:
    Bring me but to the very brim of it,
    And I’ll repair the misery, thou dost bear,
    With something rich about me: from that place
    I shall no leading need. William Shakespeare, King Lear.

    Doth not each on the sabbath loose his ox or his ass from the stall, and lead him away to watering? Luke xiii. 15.

    They thrust him out of the city, and led him unto the brow of the hill. Luke iv. 29.

    Save to every man his wife and children, that they may lead them away, and depart. 1 Sam. xxx. 22.

    Then brought he me out of the way, and led me about the way without unto the utter gate. Ezek. xlvii. 2.

    He maketh me to lie down in green pastures; he leadeth me beside the still waters. Psal. xxiii. 2.

    Would you lead forth your army against the enemy, and seek him where he is to fight? Edmund Spenser, on Ireland.

    He turns head against the lion’s armed jaws;
    And being no more in debt to years than thou,
    Leads antient lords, and rev’rend bishops, on
    To bloody battles. William Shakespeare, Henry IV. p. i.

    I wonder much,
    Being men of such great leading as you are,
    That you foresee not what impediments
    Drag back our expedition. William Shakespeare, Henry IV. p. i.

    If thou wilt have
    The leading of thy own revenges, take
    One half of my commission, and set down
    As best thou art experienc’d. William Shakespeare, Coriolanus.

    He led me on to mightiest deeds,
    Above the nerve of mortal arm,
    Against the uncircumcis’d, our enemies:
    But now hath cast me off. John Milton, Agonistes.

    Christ took not upon him flesh and blood, that he might conquer and rule nations, lead armies, or possess places. South.

    He might muster his family up, and lead them out against the Indians, to seek reparation upon any injury. John Locke.

    Which may go out before them, and which may go in before them, and which may lead them out, and which may bring them in. Numb. xxvii. 17.

    His guide, as faithful from that day,
    As Hesperus that leads the sun his way. Edward Fairfax, b. i.

    Human testimony is not so proper to lead us into the knowledge of the essence of things, as to acquaint us with the existence of things. Isaac Watts, Logick.

    Appoint him a meeting, give him a shew of comfort, and lead him on with a fine baited delay. William Shakespeare.

    The lord Cottington, being a master of temper, knew how to lead him into a mistake, and then drive him into choler, and then expose him. Edward Hyde.

    What I did, I did in honour,
    Led by th’ impartial conduct of my soul. William Shakespeare, Hen. IV.

    He was driven by the necessities of the times, more than led by his own disposition, to any rigour of actions. Charles I .

    What I say will have little influence on those whose ends lead them to wish the continuance of the war. Jonathan Swift.

    The sweet woman leads an ill life with him. William Shakespeare.

    So shalt thou lead
    Safest thy life, and best prepar’d endure
    Thy mortal passage when it comes. John Milton, Par. Lost.

    Him, fair Lavinia, thy surviving wife
    Shall breed in groves, to lead a solitary life. Dryden.

    Luther’s life was led up to the doctrines he preached, and his death was the death of the righteous. Francis Atterbury.

    Celibacy, as then practised in the church of Rome, was commonly forced, taken up under a bold vow, and led in all uncleanness. Francis Atterbury.

    This distemper is most incident to such as lead a sedentary life. John Arbuthnot, on Aliments.

  5. To Leadverb

    I will lead on softly, according as the cattle that goeth before me, and the children be able to endure. Gen. xxxiii.

    Cyrus was beaten and slain under the leading of a woman, whose wit and conduct made a great figure in antient story. William Temple.

    He left his mother a countess by patent, which was a new leading example, grown before somewhat rare, since the days of queen Mary. Henry Wotton.

    The way of maturing of tobacco must be from the heat of the earth or sun; we see some leading of this in musk-melons sown upon a hot-bed dunged below. Francis Bacon.

    The vessels heavy-laden put to sea
    With prosp’rous gales, and woman leads the way. Dryden.

Wikipedia

  1. Lead

    Lead is a chemical element with the symbol Pb (from the Latin plumbum) and atomic number 82. It is a heavy metal that is denser than most common materials. Lead is soft and malleable, and also has a relatively low melting point. When freshly cut, lead is a shiny gray with a hint of blue. It tarnishes to a dull gray color when exposed to air. Lead has the highest atomic number of any stable element and three of its isotopes are endpoints of major nuclear decay chains of heavier elements. Lead is toxic, even in small amounts, especially to children. Lead is a relatively unreactive post-transition metal. Its weak metallic character is illustrated by its amphoteric nature; lead and lead oxides react with acids and bases, and it tends to form covalent bonds. Compounds of lead are usually found in the +2 oxidation state rather than the +4 state common with lighter members of the carbon group. Exceptions are mostly limited to organolead compounds. Like the lighter members of the group, lead tends to bond with itself; it can form chains and polyhedral structures. Since lead is easily extracted from its ores, prehistoric people in the Near East were aware of it. Galena is a principal ore of lead which often bears silver. Interest in silver helped initiate widespread extraction and use of lead in ancient Rome. Lead production declined after the fall of Rome and did not reach comparable levels until the Industrial Revolution. Lead played a crucial role in the development of the printing press, as movable type could be relatively easily cast from lead alloys. In 2014, the annual global production of lead was about ten million tonnes, over half of which was from recycling. Lead's high density, low melting point, ductility and relative inertness to oxidation make it useful. These properties, combined with its relative abundance and low cost, resulted in its extensive use in construction, plumbing, batteries, bullets and shot, weights, solders, pewters, fusible alloys, white paints, leaded gasoline, and radiation shielding. Lead's toxicity became widely recognized in the late 19th century, although a number of well-educated ancient Greek and Roman writers were aware of this fact and even knew some of the symptoms of lead poisoning. Lead is a neurotoxin that accumulates in soft tissues and bones; it damages the nervous system and interferes with the function of biological enzymes, causing neurological disorders ranging from behavioral problems to brain damage, and also affects general health, cardiovascular, and renal systems.

ChatGPT

  1. lead

    Lead is a heavy, malleable, ductile, bluish-white, dense metallic chemical element of Group 14 (IVa) in the periodic table. Lead has the atomic number 82 and the symbol Pb (from Latin: plumbum). It is used in building construction, lead-acid batteries, bullets, and shot, weights, and is part of solder, pewter, fusible alloys, and radiation shields. Additionally, it can also refer to the position of being first or guiding others, as in "taking the lead in a race" or "the lead in a theatrical performance."

Webster Dictionary

  1. Leadnoun

    one of the elements, a heavy, pliable, inelastic metal, having a bright, bluish color, but easily tarnished. It is both malleable and ductile, though with little tenacity, and is used for tubes, sheets, bullets, etc. Its specific gravity is 11.37. It is easily fusible, forms alloys with other metals, and is an ingredient of solder and type metal. Atomic weight, 206.4. Symbol Pb (L. Plumbum). It is chiefly obtained from the mineral galena, lead sulphide

  2. Leadnoun

    an article made of lead or an alloy of lead

  3. Leadnoun

    a plummet or mass of lead, used in sounding at sea

  4. Leadnoun

    a thin strip of type metal, used to separate lines of type in printing

  5. Leadnoun

    sheets or plates of lead used as a covering for roofs; hence, pl., a roof covered with lead sheets or terne plates

  6. Leadnoun

    a small cylinder of black lead or plumbago, used in pencils

  7. Leadverb

    to cover, fill, or affect with lead; as, continuous firing leads the grooves of a rifle

  8. Leadverb

    to place leads between the lines of; as, to lead a page; leaded matter

  9. Leadverb

    to guide or conduct with the hand, or by means of some physical contact connection; as, a father leads a child; a jockey leads a horse with a halter; a dog leads a blind man

  10. Leadverb

    to guide or conduct in a certain course, or to a certain place or end, by making the way known; to show the way, esp. by going with or going in advance of. Hence, figuratively: To direct; to counsel; to instruct; as, to lead a traveler; to lead a pupil

  11. Leadverb

    to conduct or direct with authority; to have direction or charge of; as, to lead an army, an exploring party, or a search; to lead a political party

  12. Leadverb

    to go or to be in advance of; to precede; hence, to be foremost or chief among; as, the big sloop led the fleet of yachts; the Guards led the attack; Demosthenes leads the orators of all ages

  13. Leadverb

    to draw or direct by influence, whether good or bad; to prevail on; to induce; to entice; to allure; as, to lead one to espouse a righteous cause

  14. Leadverb

    to guide or conduct one's self in, through, or along (a certain course); hence, to proceed in the way of; to follow the path or course of; to pass; to spend. Also, to cause (one) to proceed or follow in (a certain course)

  15. Leadverb

    to begin a game, round, or trick, with; as, to lead trumps; the double five was led

  16. Leadverb

    to guide or conduct, as by accompanying, going before, showing, influencing, directing with authority, etc.; to have precedence or preeminence; to be first or chief; -- used in most of the senses of lead, v. t

  17. Leadverb

    to tend or reach in a certain direction, or to a certain place; as, the path leads to the mill; gambling leads to other vices

  18. Leadnoun

    the act of leading or conducting; guidance; direction; as, to take the lead; to be under the lead of another

  19. Leadnoun

    precedence; advance position; also, the measure of precedence; as, the white horse had the lead; a lead of a boat's length, or of half a second

  20. Leadnoun

    the act or right of playing first in a game or round; the card suit, or piece, so played; as, your partner has the lead

  21. Leadnoun

    an open way in an ice field

  22. Leadnoun

    a lode

  23. Leadnoun

    the course of a rope from end to end

  24. Leadnoun

    the width of port opening which is uncovered by the valve, for the admission or release of steam, at the instant when the piston is at end of its stroke

  25. Leadnoun

    the distance of haul, as from a cutting to an embankment

  26. Leadnoun

    the action of a tooth, as a tooth of a wheel, in impelling another tooth or a pallet

  27. Etymology: [OE. leden, AS. ldan (akin to OS. ldian, D. leiden, G. leiten, Icel. lea, Sw. leda, Dan. lede), properly a causative fr. AS. lian to go; akin to OHG. ldan, Icel. la, Goth. leian (in comp.). Cf. Lode, Loath.]

Wikidata

  1. Lead

    Lead is a chemical element in the carbon group with symbol Pb and atomic number 82. Lead is a soft and malleable metal, which is regarded as a heavy metal and poor metal. Metallic lead has a bluish-white color after being freshly cut, but it soon tarnishes to a dull grayish color when exposed to air. Lead has a shiny chrome-silver luster when it is melted into a liquid. Lead is used in building construction, lead-acid batteries, bullets and shot, weights, as part of solders, pewters, fusible alloys, and as a radiation shield. Lead has the highest atomic number of all of the stable elements, although the next higher element, bismuth, has a half-life that is so long that it can be considered stable. Its four stable isotopes have 82 protons, a magic number in the nuclear shell model of atomic nuclei. Lead, at certain contact degrees, is a poisonous substance to animals, including humans. It damages the nervous system and causes brain disorders. Excessive lead also causes blood disorders in mammals. Like the element mercury, another heavy metal, lead is a neurotoxin that accumulates both in soft tissues and the bones. Lead poisoning has been documented from ancient Rome, ancient Greece, and ancient China.

Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

  1. Lead

    lēd, v.t. to show the way by going first: to guide by the hand: to direct: to precede: to transport or carry: to allure.—v.i. to go before and show the way: to have a tendency: to exercise dominion:—pr.p. lead′ing; pa.t. and pa.p. led.—n. first place: precedence: direction: (naut.) the course of a running rope from end to end: the right of playing the first card in a round or trick: a main conductor in electrical distribution.—ns. Lead′er, one who leads or goes first: a chief: the leading editorial article in a newspaper (also Leading article): principal wheel in any machinery; Leaderette′, a brief newspaper leader; Lead′ership, state or condition of a leader or conductor; Lead′ing-bus′iness, the acting of the principal parts or rôles in plays; Lead′ing-mō′tive (Ger. leit-motif), in dramatic music, a principal theme: a theme, usually of but few tones, by which any personage or particular emotion is indicated by suggestion as often as it occurs; Lead′ing-ques′tion, a legal term for a question so put to a witness as to suggest the answer that is wished or expected.—n.pl. Lead′ing-strings, strings used to lead children when beginning to walk: vexatious care or custody.—Lead apes in hell (see Ape); Lead astray, to draw into a wrong course, to seduce from right conduct; Lead by the nose, to make one follow submissively; Lead in prayer, to offer up prayer in an assembly, uniting the prayers of others; Lead off, to begin or take the start in anything; Lead on, to persuade to go on, to draw on; Lead one a dance (see Dance); Lead up to, to bring about by degrees, to prepare for anything by steps or stages. [A.S. lǽdan, to lead, lád, a way; Ger. leiten, to lead.]

  2. Lead

    led, n. a well-known metal of a bluish-white colour: the plummet for sounding at sea: a thin plate of lead separating lines of type: (pl.) sheets of lead for covering roofs, a flat roof so covered.—v.t. to cover or fit with lead: (print.) to separate lines with leads.—n. Lead′-arm′ing, tallow, &c., placed in the hollow of a sounding-lead, to ascertain the nature of the bottom.—adjs. Lead′ed, fitted with or set in lead: (print.) separated by leads, as the lines of a book, &c.; Lead′en, made of lead: heavy: dull; Lead′en-heart′ed, having an unfeeling heart; Lead′en-step′ping (Milt.), moving slowly.—ns. Lead′-glance, lead ore, galena; Lead′-mill, a mill for grinding white-lead: a leaden disc charged with emery for grinding gems; Lead′-pen′cil, a pencil or instrument for drawing, &c., made of blacklead; Lead′-poi′soning, or Plumbism, poisoning by the absorption and diffusion of lead in the system, its commonest form, Lead or Painter's Colic; Leads′man, a seaman who heaves the lead.—adj. Lead′y, like lead. [A.S. leád; Ger. loth.]

U.S. National Library of Medicine

  1. Lead

    A soft, grayish metal with poisonous salts; atomic number 82, atomic weight 207.19, symbol Pb. (Dorland, 28th)

Dictionary of Nautical Terms

  1. lead

    The direction in which running ropes lead fair, and come down to the deck. Also, in Arctic seas, a channel through the ice; synonymous with lane. To lead into battle, or into harbour.

Military Dictionary and Gazetteer

  1. lead

    To conduct as a chief or commander; as, let the troops follow where their general leads.

Editors Contribution

  1. lead

    A type of electrical product created and designed in various colors, materials, mechanisms, shapes, sizes and styles.

    Many electrical products use a lead to connect an electrical device to a power source.


    Submitted by MaryC on April 19, 2020  


  2. lead

    A type of flexible metal.

    Lead is used in building construction, lead-acid batteries, bullets and shot, weights, as part of solders, pewters, fusible alloys, and as a radiation shield.


    Submitted by MaryC on March 15, 2016  


  3. lead

    Is an element.

    Metallic lead has a shiny chrome-silver coat when it is melted into a liquid.


    Submitted by MaryC on September 17, 2015  


  4. lead

    To guide, direct and manage a team being open, transparent, just and fair.

    The director did lead by example in all forms of the business.


    Submitted by MaryC on March 8, 2020  

Suggested Resources

  1. lead

    The lead symbol -- In this Symbols.com article you will learn about the meaning of the lead symbol and its characteristic.

  2. lead

    Song lyrics by lead -- Explore a large variety of song lyrics performed by lead on the Lyrics.com website.

  3. LEAD

    What does LEAD stand for? -- Explore the various meanings for the LEAD acronym on the Abbreviations.com website.

  4. Lead

    Lead vs. Led -- In this Grammar.com article you will learn the differences between the words Lead and Led.

Surnames Frequency by Census Records

  1. LEAD

    According to the U.S. Census Bureau, Lead is ranked #147253 in terms of the most common surnames in America.

    The Lead surname appeared 112 times in the 2010 census and if you were to sample 100,000 people in the United States, approximately 0 would have the surname Lead.

    76.7% or 86 total occurrences were White.
    8% or 9 total occurrences were of Hispanic origin.
    6.2% or 7 total occurrences were Black.
    6.2% or 7 total occurrences were Asian.

British National Corpus

  1. Spoken Corpus Frequency

    Rank popularity for the word 'lead' in Spoken Corpus Frequency: #1113

  2. Written Corpus Frequency

    Rank popularity for the word 'lead' in Written Corpus Frequency: #1726

  3. Nouns Frequency

    Rank popularity for the word 'lead' in Nouns Frequency: #796

  4. Verbs Frequency

    Rank popularity for the word 'lead' in Verbs Frequency: #61

Anagrams for lead »

  1. leda

  2. lade

  3. dale

  4. deal

How to pronounce lead?

How to say lead in sign language?

Numerology

  1. Chaldean Numerology

    The numerical value of lead in Chaldean Numerology is: 4

  2. Pythagorean Numerology

    The numerical value of lead in Pythagorean Numerology is: 4

Examples of lead in a Sentence

  1. Scott Magids:

    The emotional connection is an evolved approach to customer strategy, it’s the path to maximize the value of customer relationships that lead to organic growth.

  2. Regina Bailey:

    I voted for Hillary Clinton. I definitely would like to see, in my lifetime, a female president. I'm not going to lie to you, I would like to see that, i think it's time for an intelligent woman to lead the country.

  3. Darren Clarke:

    I am naturally extremely proud to be selected as European Ryder Cup captain for 2016, european Ryder Cup has been a massive part of my life and my career so to have the chance to lead Europe next year is a huge honor.

  4. P.L. Berger:

    In science as in love, too much concentration on technique can often lead to impotence.

  5. President Barack Obama:

    Our negotiations have made progress, but gaps remain, if Iran's leaders can agree to a reasonable deal, it can lead to a better path — the path of greater opportunities for the Iranian people.

Popularity rank by frequency of use

lead#1#1176#10000

Translations for lead

From our Multilingual Translation Dictionary

  • loodAfrikaans
  • رصاص, قادArabic
  • ҡурғашBashkir
  • цвінец, право́дзіць, весці́, вадзі́ць, праве́сці, павесці́, павадзі́цьBelarusian
  • олово, водяBulgarian
  • plom, plomoù, kas, bleinañ, renBreton
  • plom, dirigir, portar, encapçalar, conduir, anar al capdavantCatalan, Valencian
  • olovo, odsadit, vodit, véstCzech
  • вєстиOld Church Slavonic, Church Slavonic, Old Bulgarian
  • plwmWelsh
  • blyDanish
  • Leitung, Führung, Spur, Leine, Ader, Lot, Blei, Mine, Durchschuss, verbleien, Senkblei, führen, leiten, anführenGerman
  • މަގުދިލުންDivehi
  • προβάδισμα, βυθομετρητής, μολυβδοσκεπή, επιμολυβδώνω, μολύβι, μολυβδοταινία, μόλυβδοςGreek
  • plumbo, plumbi, sondilo, estri, konduki, sekvi, antaŭi, komenciĝi, komenci, logi, antaŭiriEsperanto
  • ventaja, balas, interlínea, escandallo, plomo, regleta, sonda, mina, conducir, guiar, ir a la cabeza, liderar, partir, ir en cabeza, comenzar, llevar, dirigirSpanish
  • seatina, pliiEstonian
  • berunBasque
  • سربPersian
  • lähtö, pituus, johto, kärki, johtolanka, johtoasema, varausjohto, johtaminen, hihna, kärkipaikka, latausjohto, lieka, väylä, talutushihna, ajo, vihje, lyijy, lyijykatto, riviväli, luoti, lyijylevy, johdattaa, aloittaa, opastaa, viedä, vetää, johtaa, ohjata, ajaa, kärkkyäFinnish
  • blýggjFaroese
  • prospect, laisse, tuyau, piste, mine, plomb, sonde, mener, conduire, diriger, pousser, guider, amener, commanderFrench
  • lead, liedeWestern Frisian
  • luaidheIrish
  • iall, luaidheScottish Gaelic
  • chumboGalician
  • leoaieManx
  • עופרת, הנהיג, הוביל, התחילHebrew
  • सीसा, नेतृत्वHindi
  • nyom, ólom, elöl megy, vezetHungarian
  • կապարArmenian
  • timbelIndonesian
  • duktarIdo
  • blýIcelandic
  • guida, mina, piombo, scandaglio, essere di mano, condurre, guidare, comportarsi, essere in testa, convincere, andare avanti, influenzareItalian
  • 鉛, 芯, 導く, 案内する, 達する, 引く, 率いる, リード, 到達Japanese
  • ტყვიაGeorgian
  • қорғасынKazakh
  • aqerloqKalaallisut, Greenlandic
  • ಸೀಸKannada
  • 연, 납, 鉛, 안내하다Korean
  • قورقوشمKurdish
  • plomCornish
  • plumbumLatin
  • bläiLuxembourgish, Letzeburgesch
  • švinas, vestiLithuanian
  • svins, vestLatvian
  • matāMāori
  • олово, водиMacedonian
  • കറുത്തീയം, പെന്‍സില്‍ മുന, നയിയ്ക്കുകMalayalam
  • харMongolian
  • timah hitam, timbel, plumbumMalay
  • ċombMaltese
  • leiding, lijn, aanwijzing, lood, uitkomst, vaargeul, voorsprong, leidraad, begeleiding, lengte, dieplood, verloden, stift, interlinie, blij, interliniëren, leiden, voorlopen, begeleiden, aanvoeren, uitkomen, vooroplopen, meevoerenDutch
  • blyNorwegian
  • dilyį́híNavajo, Navaho
  • cynk, smycz, prowadzenie, wyjście, trop, ołów, zaprowadzić, wychodzić, przewodzić, przeprowadzać, prowadzić, przodować, poprowadzić, pokazywać, poprzedzać, kierować, doprowadzać, wskazywać, wodzić, prowadzić się, dowodzićPolish
  • conduzir, liderança, chumbo, mina, chumbar, prumo, liderar, sair, guiarPortuguese
  • plùm, plom, plùnRomansh
  • plumb, conduce, duceRomanian
  • жила, лидерство, наводка, повод, поводок, привязь, ход, интерлиньяж, шпона, свинец, шпоны, шпон, грузило, свинцевать, межстрочное расстояние, свинцовый отвес, плюмбум, графит, вести, проводить, возглавлять, начинать, ходить, водиться, привести, приводить, вестись, водить, опережать, лидировать, склонять, руководить, пойтиRussian
  • plumbu, piumbu, prumu, piumu, peumuSardinian
  • olovo, олово, водити, voditiSerbo-Croatian
  • olovo, vodiťSlovak
  • svinec, voditiSlovene
  • plumbAlbanian
  • förhand, ledning, ledtråd, stift, bly, lod, leda, föraSwedish
  • ongozaSwahili
  • సీసముTelugu
  • surbTajik
  • ตะกั้วThai
  • kurşun, kalem ucu, uçTurkish
  • свинець, поводи́ти, повести́, проводити, вести́, води́тиUkrainian
  • кўогъшсинUzbek
  • chìVietnamese
  • plumbinVolapük
  • בלײַYiddish

Get even more translations for lead »

Translation

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  • Nederlands (Dutch)
  • Ελληνικά (Greek)
  • Latinum (Latin)
  • Svenska (Swedish)
  • Dansk (Danish)
  • Suomi (Finnish)
  • فارسی (Persian)
  • ייִדיש (Yiddish)
  • հայերեն (Armenian)
  • Norsk (Norwegian)
  • English (English)

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    A contribution
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