What does language mean?

Definitions for language
ˈlæŋ gwɪdʒlan·guage

Here are all the possible meanings and translations of the word language.

Princeton's WordNet

  1. language, linguistic communicationnoun

    a systematic means of communicating by the use of sounds or conventional symbols

    "he taught foreign languages"; "the language introduced is standard throughout the text"; "the speed with which a program can be executed depends on the language in which it is written"

  2. speech, speech communication, spoken communication, spoken language, language, voice communication, oral communicationnoun

    (language) communication by word of mouth

    "his speech was garbled"; "he uttered harsh language"; "he recorded the spoken language of the streets"

  3. lyric, words, languagenoun

    the text of a popular song or musical-comedy number

    "his compositions always started with the lyrics"; "he wrote both words and music"; "the song uses colloquial language"

  4. linguistic process, languagenoun

    the cognitive processes involved in producing and understanding linguistic communication

    "he didn't have the language to express his feelings"

  5. language, speechnoun

    the mental faculty or power of vocal communication

    "language sets homo sapiens apart from all other animals"

  6. terminology, nomenclature, languagenoun

    a system of words used to name things in a particular discipline

    "legal terminology"; "biological nomenclature"; "the language of sociology"

GCIDE

  1. Languagenoun

    Any system of symbols created for the purpose of communicating ideas, emotions, commands, etc., between sentient agents.

    Etymology: [OE. langage, F. langage, fr. L. lingua the tongue, hence speech, language; akin to E. tongue. See Tongue, cf. Lingual.]

  2. Languagenoun

    Specifically: (computers) Any set of symbols and the rules for combining them which are used to specify to a computer the actions that it is to take; also referred to as a computer lanugage or programming language; as, JAVA is a new and flexible high-level language which has achieved popularity very rapidly.

    Etymology: [OE. langage, F. langage, fr. L. lingua the tongue, hence speech, language; akin to E. tongue. See Tongue, cf. Lingual.]

Wiktionary

  1. languagenoun

    A form of communication using words either spoken or gestured with the hands and structured with grammar, often with a writing system.

  2. languagenoun

    The ability to communicate using words.

    the gift of language

  3. languagenoun

    Nonverbal communication.

    body language

  4. languagenoun

    A computer language.

  5. languagenoun

    The vocabulary and usage used in a particular specialist field.

    legal language

  6. languagenoun

    The particular words used in speech or a passage of text.

  7. languagenoun

    Profanity.

  8. languagenoun

    Words, written or spoken, in a specific sequence that a person uses to describe, to a another person, the type of thoughts in their mind.

  9. languageverb

    To communicate by language; to express in language.

    Others were languaged in such doubtful expressions that they have a double sense. uE0004411uE001 Fuller.

Webster Dictionary

  1. Languagenoun

    any means of conveying or communicating ideas; specifically, human speech; the expression of ideas by the voice; sounds, expressive of thought, articulated by the organs of the throat and mouth

    Etymology: [OE. langage, F. langage, fr. L. lingua the tongue, hence speech, language; akin to E. tongue. See Tongue, cf. Lingual.]

  2. Languagenoun

    the expression of ideas by writing, or any other instrumentality

    Etymology: [OE. langage, F. langage, fr. L. lingua the tongue, hence speech, language; akin to E. tongue. See Tongue, cf. Lingual.]

  3. Languagenoun

    the forms of speech, or the methods of expressing ideas, peculiar to a particular nation

    Etymology: [OE. langage, F. langage, fr. L. lingua the tongue, hence speech, language; akin to E. tongue. See Tongue, cf. Lingual.]

  4. Languagenoun

    the characteristic mode of arranging words, peculiar to an individual speaker or writer; manner of expression; style

    Etymology: [OE. langage, F. langage, fr. L. lingua the tongue, hence speech, language; akin to E. tongue. See Tongue, cf. Lingual.]

  5. Languagenoun

    the inarticulate sounds by which animals inferior to man express their feelings or their wants

    Etymology: [OE. langage, F. langage, fr. L. lingua the tongue, hence speech, language; akin to E. tongue. See Tongue, cf. Lingual.]

  6. Languagenoun

    the suggestion, by objects, actions, or conditions, of ideas associated therewith; as, the language of flowers

    Etymology: [OE. langage, F. langage, fr. L. lingua the tongue, hence speech, language; akin to E. tongue. See Tongue, cf. Lingual.]

  7. Languagenoun

    the vocabulary and phraseology belonging to an art or department of knowledge; as, medical language; the language of chemistry or theology

    Etymology: [OE. langage, F. langage, fr. L. lingua the tongue, hence speech, language; akin to E. tongue. See Tongue, cf. Lingual.]

  8. Languagenoun

    a race, as distinguished by its speech

    Etymology: [OE. langage, F. langage, fr. L. lingua the tongue, hence speech, language; akin to E. tongue. See Tongue, cf. Lingual.]

  9. Languageverb

    to communicate by language; to express in language

    Etymology: [OE. langage, F. langage, fr. L. lingua the tongue, hence speech, language; akin to E. tongue. See Tongue, cf. Lingual.]

Freebase

  1. Language

    the type of which all languages are instances

Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

  1. Language

    lang′gwāj, n. that which is spoken by the tongue: human speech: speech peculiar to a nation: style or expression peculiar to an individual: diction: any manner of expressing thought.—v.t. to express in language.—adjs. Lang′uaged, skilled in language; Lang′uageless (Shak.), speechless, silent; Lang′ued (her.), furnished with a tongue.—Dead language, one no longer spoken, as opp. to Living language, one still spoken; Flash language (see Flash). [Fr. langagelangue—L. lingua (old form dingua), the tongue, akin to L. lingēre, Gr. leichein.]

The Roycroft Dictionary

  1. language

    The tool of the mind.

U.S. National Library of Medicine

  1. Language

    A verbal or nonverbal means of communicating ideas or feelings.

Editors Contribution

  1. language

    A form of communication we intuitively feel, know and understand as intelligent animals and human beings.

    We have various forms of language including speech, written and body language.

    Submitted by MaryC on November 5, 2020  
  2. language

    A systematic act, fact and ability to communicate by the use of words, definitions, expression, energy, structure, creativity, rules, sounds, voices, symbols, speech, typing, knowing, understanding or instructions.

    Language differs in each country yet people can communicate even if they do not speak or know a language.

    Submitted by MaryC on January 12, 2020  
  3. language

    The act, fact and ability to communicate using words.

    We all know what the language feels like as you can see it within a person as they look at you.

    Submitted by MaryC on January 18, 2020  

British National Corpus

  1. Spoken Corpus Frequency

    Rank popularity for the word 'language' in Spoken Corpus Frequency: #472

  2. Written Corpus Frequency

    Rank popularity for the word 'language' in Written Corpus Frequency: #974

  3. Nouns Frequency

    Rank popularity for the word 'language' in Nouns Frequency: #150

How to pronounce language?

How to say language in sign language?

Numerology

  1. Chaldean Numerology

    The numerical value of language in Chaldean Numerology is: 9

  2. Pythagorean Numerology

    The numerical value of language in Pythagorean Numerology is: 5

Examples of language in a Sentence

  1. Manuel L. Quezon:

    The Latin American people believed and feel that we Filipinos form part of that vast family, the children of Spain. Thus, although Spain ceased to govern those countries many years ago and although another nation is sovereign in the Philippines, those Latin-American peoples feel themselves as brothers to the people of the Philippines. It is the Spanish language that still binds us to those peoples, and the Spanish language will bind us to those peoples eternally if we have the wisdom and patriotism of preserving it.

  2. Renata Filippini:

    For optimal language development, controlling background noise is highly recommended, especially during specific learning moments, like during a story telling activity or during feeding times.

  3. Christina Pacala:

    My husband and I welcomed our beautiful baby girl, Riley, into the world in October 2020, shortly after Riley's birth through a series of tests with an audiologist, we learned that Riley is deaf.We've made it our goal to give Riley access to as many tools as possible to help her communication and development – that includes giving her access to both American Sign Language, and spoken English.

  4. Jim Gregory:

    In short, they are suggested language to be used if the situation applies. Yesterday, our operations center asked if they could forward my talking points out to all( federal security directors ], and I thought it might be helpful, so I agreed.

  5. Dana Bash:

    I remember how tough it was to try to learn a new culture, a new language and just to adapt to, like, ordinary daily stuff like the food. Like, most Chinese don't eat meat between breads.

Popularity rank by frequency of use

language#1#562#10000

Translations for language

From our Multilingual Translation Dictionary

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