What does jargon mean?

Definitions for jargon
ˈdʒɑr gən, -gɒnjar·gon

This dictionary definitions page includes all the possible meanings, example usage and translations of the word jargon.

Princeton's WordNet

  1. slang, cant, jargon, lingo, argot, patois, vernacularnoun

    a characteristic language of a particular group (as among thieves)

    "they don't speak our lingo"

  2. jargoon, jargonnoun

    a colorless (or pale yellow or smoky) variety of zircon

  3. jargonnoun

    specialized technical terminology characteristic of a particular subject

Wikipedia

  1. Jargon

    Jargon is the specialized terminology associated with a particular field or area of activity. Jargon is normally employed in a particular communicative context and may not be well understood outside that context. The context is usually a particular occupation (that is, a certain trade, profession, vernacular or academic field), but any ingroup can have jargon. The main trait that distinguishes jargon from the rest of a language is special vocabulary—including some words specific to it and often different senses or meanings of words, that outgroups would tend to take in another sense—therefore misunderstanding that communication attempt. Jargon is sometimes understood as a form of technical slang and then distinguished from the official terminology used in a particular field of activity.The terms jargon, slang, and argot are not consistently differentiated in the literature; different authors interpret these concepts in varying ways. According to one definition, jargon differs from slang in being secretive in nature; according to another understanding, it is specifically associated with professional and technical circles. Some sources, however, treat these terms as synonymous. In Russian linguistics, jargon is classified as an expressive form of language, while secret languages are referred to as argots. The use of jargon became more popular around the sixteenth century attracting persons from different career paths. This led to there being printed copies available on the various forms of jargon.

ChatGPT

  1. jargon

    Jargon is a set of specialized terms or language used by a particular profession, industry, or group, which may not be easily understood by individuals outside of that specific group. It is essentially language specific to a subject, typically loaded with technical terms and abbreviations.

Webster Dictionary

  1. Jargonnoun

    confused, unintelligible language; gibberish; hence, an artificial idiom or dialect; cant language; slang

  2. Jargonverb

    to utter jargon; to emit confused or unintelligible sounds; to talk unintelligibly, or in a harsh and noisy manner

  3. Jargonnoun

    a variety of zircon. See Zircon

  4. Etymology: [F. jargon, OF. also gargon, perh. akin to E. garrulous, or gargle.]

Wikidata

  1. Jargon

    Jargon is "the technical terminology or characteristic idiom of a special activity or group." The philosopher Condillac observed in 1782 that "every science requires a special language because every science has its own ideas." As a rationalist member of the Enlightenment he continued, "It seems that one ought to begin by composing this language, but people begin by speaking and writing, and the language remains to be composed." In earlier times, the term jargon would refer to trade languages used by people who spoke different native tongues to communicate, such as the Chinook Jargon. In other words, the term covers the language used by people who work in a particular area or who have a common interest. Much like slang, it can develop as a kind of shorthand, to express ideas that are frequently discussed between members of a group, though it can also be developed deliberately using chosen terms. A standard term may be given a more precise or unique usage among practitioners of a field. In many cases this causes a barrier to communication with those not familiar with the language of the field. For example, bit, byte, and hexadecimal are jargon terms related to computing.

Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

  1. Jargon

    jär′gon, n. confused talk: slang.—n. Jar′gonist, one who uses jargon. [Fr. jargon, prob. conn. with L. garrīre, to prattle.]

  2. Jargon

    jär′gon, n. a variety of zircon found in Ceylon, transparent, colourless.—Also Jar′goon.

How to pronounce jargon?

How to say jargon in sign language?

Numerology

  1. Chaldean Numerology

    The numerical value of jargon in Chaldean Numerology is: 1

  2. Pythagorean Numerology

    The numerical value of jargon in Pythagorean Numerology is: 2

Examples of jargon in a Sentence

  1. George Hobica:

    Airline staff have been given a lot more power and have become policemen in the skies since 9-11, i think many are abusing that authority. Most of your rights and company policies—including when you are entitled to compensation for your inconvenience— are spelled out in the conditions of carriage which can be found on an airline’s website. The lengthy terms are filled with jargon and legalese, though they’re still worth eyeballing to understand the basics. Here are key reasons why an airline can bump you or otherwise make travel difficult for you: 1. The airline priced tickets for this flight too low.If a carrier realizes through its electronic reservation system that a non-stop flight fills too fast, that could indicate the ticket fares are too cheap. In such a case, your flight could be switched from a non-stop to a connecting flight. 2. The air marshal needs your seat. Because air marshals protect the public, they are sometimes seated in first class without prior warning. If one of them shows up and needs your seat, you can be bumped, reassigned to another seat, or put on the next available flight. And you won’t even get an explanation; the government doesn’t want you to blab that there’s an air marshal on board. 3. The carrier abandons the route. Consolidation within the industry has prompted some airlines to cut back on the number of available flights. Some, such as Allegiant Air and Frontier, have also abandoned routes that are no longer profitable. An airline should be required to put you on another carrier for the price you paid, says Hobica. But that’s not the case.

  2. Dominique Villa:

    Very often the problem of the UN is that the speeches long, full of acronyms, and the jargon is difficult to understand, making the jargon of the U.N. understandable is quite important.

  3. Eric Bentley:

    Ours is the age of substitutes instead of language, we have jargon instead of principles, slogans and instead of genuine ideas, bright ideas.

  4. James Wilson:

    Sounds like they're using technical jargon to say they're slowing production, without saying they're slowing production.

  5. Stephen Evans:

    The data show that there is only a small difference between the groups in improvement, these improvements are not dramatic - they are not a' game changer' in the terrible jargon, but at least there is some genuine evidence of improvement. For the patients it is good news that few died, but the evidence therefore that remdesivir improves mortality in these patients is uncertain and limited.

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Translations for jargon

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"jargon." Definitions.net. STANDS4 LLC, 2024. Web. 15 Jun 2024. <https://www.definitions.net/definition/jargon>.

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