What does intermission mean?

Definitions for intermission
ˌɪn tərˈmɪʃ ənin·ter·mis·sion

This dictionary definitions page includes all the possible meanings, example usage and translations of the word intermission.

Princeton's WordNet

  1. intermissionnoun

    the act of suspending activity temporarily

  2. pause, intermission, break, interruption, suspensionnoun

    a time interval during which there is a temporary cessation of something

GCIDE

  1. Intermissionnoun

    Specifically: The short period between acts of a play, concert, opera, or other public performance when the audience may leave their seats for refreshment; -- it usually lasts from 10 to 20 minutes.

Wiktionary

  1. intermissionnoun

    A break between two performances or sessions, such as at a concert, play, seminar, or religious assembly.

Samuel Johnson's Dictionary

  1. Intermissionnoun

    Etymology: intermission, Fr. intermissio, Lat.

    Came a reeking post,
    Deliver'd letters, spight of intermission,
    Which presently they read. William Shakespeare, King Lear.

    I count intermission almost the same thing as change; for that that hath been intermitted, is after a sort new. Francis Bacon.

    The water ascends gently, and by intermissions; but it falls continuately, and with force. John Wilkins, Dæd.

    The peasants work on, in the hottest part of the day, without intermission. John Locke.

    But gentle heav'n
    Cut short all intermission: front to front,
    Bring thou this fiend of Scotland and myself. William Shakespeare.

    Words borrowed of antiquity, have the authority of years, and out of their intermission do win to themselves a kind of grace-like newness. Ben Jonson.

    Rest or intermission none I find. John Milton.

Wikipedia

  1. Intermission

    An intermission, also known as an interval in British and Indian English, is a recess between parts of a performance or production, such as for a theatrical play, opera, concert, or film screening. It should not be confused with an entr'acte (French: "between acts"), which, in the 18th century, was a sung, danced, spoken, or musical performance that occurs between any two acts, that is unrelated to the main performance, and that thus in the world of opera and musical theater became an orchestral performance that spans an intermission and leads, without a break, into the next act.Jean-François Marmontel and Denis Diderot both viewed the intermission as a period in which the action did not in fact stop, but continued off-stage. "The interval is a rest for the spectators; not for the action," wrote Marmontel in 1763. "The characters are deemed to continue acting during the interval from one act to another." However, intermissions are more than just dramatic pauses that are parts of the shape of a dramatic structure. They also exist for more mundane reasons, such as that it is hard for audience members to concentrate for more than two hours at a stretch, and actors and performers (for live action performances at any rate) need to rest. They also afford opportunity for scene and costume changes. Performance venues take advantage of them to sell food and drink.Psychologically, intermissions allow audiences to pause their suspension of disbelief and return to reality, and are a period during which they can engage critical faculties that they have suspended during the performance itself.

ChatGPT

  1. intermission

    Intermission is a brief interval or pause in an ongoing activity, event or performance, usually allowing participants or audience to rest, refresh or prepare for the next part of the event.

Webster Dictionary

  1. Intermissionnoun

    the act or the state of intermitting; the state of being neglected or disused; disuse; discontinuance

  2. Intermissionnoun

    cessation for a time; an intervening period of time; an interval; a temporary pause; as, to labor without intermission; an intermission of ten minutes

  3. Intermissionnoun

    the temporary cessation or subsidence of a fever; the space of time between the paroxysms of a disease. Intermission is an entire cessation, as distinguished from remission, or abatement of fever

  4. Intermissionnoun

    intervention; interposition

  5. Etymology: [L. intermissio: cf. F. intermission. See Intermit.]

Wikidata

  1. Intermission

    An intermission or interval is a recess between parts of a performance or production, such as for a theatrical play, opera, concert, or film screening. It should not be confused with an entr'acte, which, in the 18th century, was a sung, danced, spoken, or musical performance that occurs between any two acts, that is unrelated to the main performance, and that thus in the world of opera and musical theatre became an orchestral performance that spans an intermission and leads, without a break, into the next act. Marmontel and Diderot both viewed the interval as a period in which the action did not in fact stop, but continued off-stage. "The interval is a rest for the spectators; not for the action.", wrote Marmontel in 1763. "The characters are deemed to continue acting during the interval from one act to another." However, intervals are more than just dramatic pauses that are parts of the shape of a dramatic structure. They also exist for more mundane reasons, such as that it is hard for audience members to concentrate for more than two hours at a stretch, and actors and performers need to rest. They afford opportunity for scene and costume changes. And of course performance venues take advantage of them to sell food and drink.

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Numerology

  1. Chaldean Numerology

    The numerical value of intermission in Chaldean Numerology is: 5

  2. Pythagorean Numerology

    The numerical value of intermission in Pythagorean Numerology is: 2

Examples of intermission in a Sentence

  1. Arnold H. Glasgow:

    Make your life a mission-not an intermission.

  2. John Selden:

    Pleasure is nothing else but the intermission of pain.

  3. Arnold Glasow:

    Make your life a mission - not an intermission.

Popularity rank by frequency of use

intermission#10000#34313#100000

Translations for intermission

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"intermission." Definitions.net. STANDS4 LLC, 2024. Web. 27 May 2024. <https://www.definitions.net/definition/intermission>.

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