What does hunting mean?

Definitions for hunting
ˈhʌn tɪŋhunt·ing

This dictionary definitions page includes all the possible meanings, example usage and translations of the word hunting.

Princeton's WordNet

  1. hunt, huntingnoun

    the pursuit and killing or capture of wild animals regarded as a sport

  2. search, hunt, huntingnoun

    the activity of looking thoroughly in order to find something or someone

  3. hunt, huntingnoun

    the work of finding and killing or capturing animals for food or pelts

Wiktionary

  1. huntingnoun

    Chasing and killing animals for sport or to get food.

  2. huntingnoun

    Looking for something, especially for a job or flat.

    After I finish house hunting I'll have to go job hunting as well.

  3. huntingnoun

    Fluctuating around a central value without stabilizing.

Wikipedia

  1. Hunting

    Hunting is the human practice of seeking, pursuing, capturing, or killing wildlife or feral animals. The most common reasons for humans to hunt are to harvest food (i.e. meat) and useful animal products (fur/hide, bone/tusks, horn/antler, etc.), for recreation/taxidermy (see trophy hunting), to remove predators dangerous to humans or domestic animals (e.g. wolf hunting), to eliminate pests and nuisance animals that damage crops/livestock/poultry or spread diseases (see varminting), for trade/tourism (see safari), or for ecological conservation against overpopulation and invasive species. Recreationally hunted species are generally referred to as the game, and are usually mammals and birds. A person participating in a hunt is a hunter or (less commonly) huntsman; a natural area used for hunting is called a game reserve; an experienced hunter who helps organize a hunt and/or manage the game reserve is known as a gamekeeper. Many non-human animals also hunt (see predation) as part of their feeding and parental behaviors, sometimes in quantities exceeding immediate dietary needs. The one that does the hunting is the predator, and the one being hunted is the prey. Hunting activities by humans arose in Homo erectus or earlier, in the order of millions of years ago. Hunting has become deeply embedded in various human cultures and was once an important part of the rural economies—classified by economists as part of primary production alongside forestry, agriculture and fishery. Modern regulations (see game law) distinguish lawful hunting activities from illegal poaching, which involves the unauthorized and unregulated killing, trapping or capture of animals. Apart from food provision, hunting can be a means of population control. Hunting advocates state that regulated hunting can be a necessary component of modern wildlife management, for example to help maintain a healthy proportion of animal populations within an environment's ecological carrying capacity when natural checks such as natural predators are absent or insufficient, or to provide funding for breeding programs and maintenance of natural reserves and conservation parks. However, excessive hunting has also heavily contributed to the endangerment, extirpation and extinction of many animals. Some animal rights and anti-hunting activists regard hunting as a cruel, perverse and unnecessary blood sport. Certain hunting practices, such as canned hunts and ludicrously paid/bribed trophy tours (especially to poor countries), are considered unethical and exploitative even by some hunters. Marine mammals such as whales and pinnipeds are also targets of hunting, both recreationally and commercially, often with heated controversies regarding the morality, ethics and legality of such practices. The pursuit, harvesting or catch and release of fish and aquatic cephalopods and crustaceans is called fishing, which however is widely accepted and not commonly categorised as a form of hunting, even though it essentially is. It is also not considered hunting to pursue animals without intent to kill them, as in wildlife photography, birdwatching, or scientific-research activities which involve tranquilizing or tagging of animals, although green hunting is still called so. The practices of netting or trapping insects and other arthropods for trophy collection, or the foraging or gathering of plants and mushrooms, are also not regarded as hunting. Skillful tracking and acquisition of an elusive target has caused the word hunt to be used in the vernacular as a metaphor for searching and obtaining something, as in "treasure hunting", "bargain hunting", "hunting for votes" and even "hunting down" corruption and waste.

Webster Dictionary

  1. Hunting

    of Hunt

  2. Huntingnoun

    the pursuit of game or of wild animals

Freebase

  1. Hunting

    Hunting is the practice of pursuing any living organism, usually wildlife or feral animals, by humans for food, recreation, or trade. Animals may also hunt other animal species, but this is usually called predation. In present-day use, lawful hunting is distinguished from poaching, which is the killing, trapping or capture of the hunted species contrary to applicable law. The species that are hunted are referred to as game and are usually mammals and migratory or non-migratory gamebirds. Hunting can also involve the elimination of vermin, as a means of pest control to prevent diseases caused by overpopulation. Hunting advocates state that hunting can be a necessary component of modern wildlife management, for example, to help maintain a population of healthy animals within an environment's ecological carrying capacity when natural checks such as predators are absent. In the United States, wildlife managers are frequently part of hunting regulatory and licensing bodies, where they help to set rules on the number, manner and conditions in which game may be hunted. The pursuit, capture and release, or capture for food of fish is called fishing, which is not commonly categorised as a form of hunting. Trapping is also usually considered a separate activity. It is also not considered hunting to pursue animals without intent to kill them, as in wildlife photography or birdwatching. The practice of foraging or gathering materials from plants and mushrooms is also considered separate.

Surnames Frequency by Census Records

  1. HUNTING

    According to the U.S. Census Bureau, Hunting is ranked #27331 in terms of the most common surnames in America.

    The Hunting surname appeared 884 times in the 2010 census and if you were to sample 100,000 people in the United States, approximately 0 would have the surname Hunting.

    94.6% or 837 total occurrences were White.
    1.5% or 14 total occurrences were of two or more races.
    1.4% or 13 total occurrences were Black.
    1.3% or 12 total occurrences were of Hispanic origin.

British National Corpus

  1. Written Corpus Frequency

    Rank popularity for the word 'hunting' in Written Corpus Frequency: #3267

  2. Nouns Frequency

    Rank popularity for the word 'hunting' in Nouns Frequency: #1996

How to pronounce hunting?

How to say hunting in sign language?

Numerology

  1. Chaldean Numerology

    The numerical value of hunting in Chaldean Numerology is: 2

  2. Pythagorean Numerology

    The numerical value of hunting in Pythagorean Numerology is: 3

Examples of hunting in a Sentence

  1. Peter Rose:

    I haven't got an order book. We don't know if revenue will continue at the current rate or whether it will decline, what is Hunting going to deliver in terms of profitability? I haven't got a clue.

  2. Katarzyna Karpa-Swiderek:

    There is no scientific basis for this, it is barbarism, we broadly do not protest against hunting wild boars, but in our opinion the scope of the proposed cull is excessive.

  3. Noriko Miyoshi:

    The pace looks too fast. Investors across the world rushed to take part in the game of yield hunting.

  4. Andrew Timmins:

    When you get very little food or just one species producing, bears become a little bit more predictable, or a lot more predictable, in a year like this when there are just acorns, if you’re a hunter, you’re going to be hunting in acorns. That’s where the bears are.

  5. Kelly Buck:

    Our whole family loves hunting for shark teeth, xander and my husband were searching in the swash during low tide when Xander spotted this one in the mud.

Popularity rank by frequency of use

hunting#1#3707#10000

Translations for hunting

From our Multilingual Translation Dictionary

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"hunting." Definitions.net. STANDS4 LLC, 2023. Web. 6 Jun 2023. <https://www.definitions.net/definition/hunting>.

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    be hungry; go without food
    • A. famish
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