What does humour mean?

Definitions for humour
ˈhyu mərhu·mour

This dictionary definitions page includes all the possible meanings, example usage and translations of the word humour.

Princeton's WordNet

  1. temper, mood, humor, humournoun

    a characteristic (habitual or relatively temporary) state of feeling

    "whether he praised or cursed me depended on his temper at the time"; "he was in a bad humor"

  2. wit, humor, humour, witticism, wittinessnoun

    a message whose ingenuity or verbal skill or incongruity has the power to evoke laughter

  3. humor, humournoun

    (Middle Ages) one of the four fluids in the body whose balance was believed to determine your emotional and physical state

    "the humors are blood and phlegm and yellow and black bile"

  4. liquid body substance, bodily fluid, body fluid, humor, humournoun

    the liquid parts of the body

  5. humor, humournoun

    the quality of being funny

    "I fail to see the humor in it"

  6. humor, humour, sense of humor, sense of humourverb

    the trait of appreciating (and being able to express) the humorous

    "she didn't appreciate my humor"; "you can't survive in the army without a sense of humor"

  7. humor, humourverb

    put into a good mood

Wiktionary

  1. humournoun

    Moist vapour, moisture.

  2. humournoun

    Any of the fluids in an animal body, especially the four "cardinal humours" of blood, yellow bile, black bile and phlegm that were believed to control the health and mood of the human body.

  3. humournoun

    Either of the two regions of liquid within the eyeball, the aqueous humour and vitreous humour.

  4. humournoun

    One's state of mind or disposition; one's mood.

  5. humournoun

    The quality in events, speech or writing which is seen as funny, or creates amusement, such as a joke, satire, parody, etc.

  6. humourverb

    To pacify by indulging.

    I know you don't believe my story, but humour me for a minute and imagine it to be true.

Samuel Johnson's Dictionary

  1. HUMOURnoun

    Etymology: humeur, French; humor, Latin.

    The aqueous humour of the eye will not freeze, which is very admirable, seeing it hath the perspicuity and fluidity of common water. John Ray, on the Creation.

    Believe not these suggestions, which proceed
    From anguish of the mind and humours black,
    That mingle with thy fancy. John Milton, Agonistes.

    As there is no humour, to which impudent poverty cannot make itself serviceable; so were there enow of those of desperate ambition, who would build their houses upon others ruin. Philip Sidney, b. ii.

    There came with her a young lord, led hither with the humour of youth, which ever thinks that good whose goodness he sees not. Philip Sidney.

    King James, as he was a prince of great judgment, so he was a prince of a marvellous pleasant humour: as he was going through Lusen by Greenwich, he asked what town it was; they said Lusen. He asked, a good while after, what town is this we are now in? They said still it was Lusen: said the king, I will be king of Lusen. Francis Bacon, Apophthegms.

    Examine how your humour is inclin’d,
    And which the ruling passion of your mind. Wentworth Dillon.

    They, who were acquainted with him, know his humour to be such, that he would never constrain himself. Dryden.

    In cases where it is necessary to make examples, it is the humour of the multitude to forget the crime, and to remember the punishment. Joseph Addison, Freeholder.

    Good humour only teaches charms to last,
    Still makes new conquests, and maintains the past. Alexander Pope.

    It is the curse of kings to be attended
    By slaves, that take their humours for a warrant
    To break into the blood-house of life. William Shakespeare, K. John.

    Another thought her nobler humour fed. Edward Fairfax, b. ii.

    Their humours are not to be won,
    But when they are impos’d upon. Hudibras, p. iii.

    Tempt not his heavy hand;
    But one submissive word which you let fall,
    Will make him in good humour with us all. Dryden.

    He was a man frank and generous; when well, denied himself nothing that he had a mind to eat or drink, which gave him a body full of humours, and made his fits of the gout frequent and violent. William Temple.

    Is my friend all perfection, all virtue and discretion? Has he not humours to be endured, as well as kindnesses to be enjoyed? Robert South, Sermons.

    I like not the humour of lying: he hath wronged me in some humours: I should have born the humour’d letter to her. William Shakespeare, Merry Wives of Windsor.

    In private, men are more bold in their own humours; and in consort, men are more obnoxious to others humours; therefore it is good to take both. Francis Bacon, Essays.

  2. To Humourverb

    Etymology: from the noun.

    If I had a suit to master Shallow, I would humour his men; if to his men, I would curry with master Shallow. William Shakespeare.

    If I were Brutus now, and he were Cassius,
    He should not humour me. William Shakespeare, Julius Cæsar.

    Obedience and subjection were never enjoined by God to humour the passions, lusts, and vanities of those who are commanded to obey our governours. Jonathan Swift.

    You humour me, when I am sick;
    Why not when I am splenetick? Alexander Pope.

    Children are fond of something which strikes their fancy most, and sullen and regardless of every thing else, if they are not humoured in that fancy. Isaac Watts, Logick.

    To after age thou shalt be writ the man,
    That with smooth air could’st humour best our tongue. John Milton.

    ’Tis my part to invent, and the musicians to humour that invention. John Dryden, Albion. Preface to.

    Fountainbleau is situated among rocks and woods, that give a fine variety of savage prospects: the king has humoured the genius of the place, and only made use of so much art as is necessary to regulate nature. Joseph Addison, Guardian.

Wikipedia

  1. Humour

    Humour (Commonwealth English) or humor (American English) is the tendency of experiences to provoke laughter and provide amusement. The term derives from the humoral medicine of the ancient Greeks, which taught that the balance of fluids in the human body, known as humours (Latin: humorcode: lat promoted to code: la , "body fluid"), controlled human health and emotion. People of all ages and cultures respond to humour. Most people are able to experience humour—be amused, smile or laugh at something funny (such as a pun or joke)—and thus are considered to have a sense of humour. The hypothetical person lacking a sense of humour would likely find the behaviour to be inexplicable, strange, or even irrational. Though ultimately decided by personal taste, the extent to which a person finds something humorous depends on a host of variables, including geographical location, culture, maturity, level of education, intelligence and context. For example, young children may favour slapstick such as Punch and Judy puppet shows or the Tom and Jerry cartoons, whose physical nature makes it accessible to them. By contrast, more sophisticated forms of humour such as satire require an understanding of its social meaning and context, and thus tend to appeal to a more mature audience.

ChatGPT

  1. humour

    Humour refers to the quality of being amusing, comical or funny, characterized by expressions, actions, events, literature or thoughts that provoke laughter or amusement. It often involves a sense of absurdity or incongruity, and can also involve related traits like wit, puns, jokes, and satire. It can also reflect the ability to appreciate, produce, or express what's amusing or comical. The concept of humour varies widely among different cultures and people.

Wikidata

  1. Humour

    Humour or humor is the tendency of particular cognitive experiences to provoke laughter and provide amusement. The term derives from the humoural medicine of the ancient Greeks, which taught that the balance of fluids in the human body, known as humours, control human health and emotion. People of all ages and cultures respond to humour. The majority of people are able to experience humour, i.e., to be amused, to laugh or smile at something funny, and thus they are considered to have a sense of humour. The hypothetical person lacking a sense of humour would likely find the behaviour induced by humour to be inexplicable, strange, or even irrational. Though ultimately decided by personal taste, the extent to which a person will find something humorous depends upon a host of variables, including geographical location, culture, maturity, level of education, intelligence and context. For example, young children may favour slapstick, such as Punch and Judy puppet shows or cartoons such as Tom and Jerry. Satire may rely more on understanding the target of the humour and thus tends to appeal to more mature audiences.

Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

  1. Humour

    hū′mur, or ū′mur, n. the moisture or fluids of animal bodies: an animal fluid in an unhealthy state: state of mind (because once thought to depend on the humours of the body), as 'good' and 'ill humour:' disposition: caprice: a mental quality which delights in ludicrous and mirthful ideas: playful fancy.—v.t. to go in with the humour of: to gratify by compliance.—adj. Hū′moral, pertaining to or proceeding from the humours.—ns. Hū′moralism, the state of being humoral: the doctrine that diseases have their seat in the humours; Hū′moralist, one who favours the doctrine of humoralism; Humoresque′, a musical caprice; Hū′morist, one whose conduct and conversation are regulated by humour or caprice: one who studies or portrays the humours of people: one possessed of humour: a writer of comic stories.—adjs. Humoris′tic, humorous; Hū′morless, without humour; Hū′morous, governed by humour: capricious: irregular: full of humour: exciting laughter.—adv. Hū′morously.—n. Hū′morousness.—adj. Hū′moursome, capricious, petulant.—n. Hū′moursomeness.—Out of humour, out of temper, displeased; The new humour, a so-called modern literary product in which there is even less humour than novelty. [O. Fr. humor (Fr. humeur)—L. humorhumēre, to be moist.]

The Nuttall Encyclopedia

  1. Humour

    distinct from wit, and defined as "a warm, tender, fellow-feeling with all that exists," as "the sport of sensibility and, as it were, the playful, teasing fondness of a mother for a child" ... as "a sort of inverse sublimity exalting into our affections what is below us,... warm and all-embracing as the sun."

Editors Contribution

  1. humour

    The ability to create, perceive and express ourselves with fun and laughter.

    Humour is vital for life for all of humanity.


    Submitted by MaryC on March 17, 2020  

Suggested Resources

  1. Humour

    Humour vs. Humor -- In this Grammar.com article you will learn the differences between the words Humour and Humor.

British National Corpus

  1. Spoken Corpus Frequency

    Rank popularity for the word 'humour' in Spoken Corpus Frequency: #4073

  2. Nouns Frequency

    Rank popularity for the word 'humour' in Nouns Frequency: #1684

How to pronounce humour?

How to say humour in sign language?

Numerology

  1. Chaldean Numerology

    The numerical value of humour in Chaldean Numerology is: 3

  2. Pythagorean Numerology

    The numerical value of humour in Pythagorean Numerology is: 6

Examples of humour in a Sentence

  1. Jane Austen, Northanger Abbey:

    Only a novel"... in short, only some work in which the greatest powers of the mind are displayed, in which the most thorough knowledge of human nature, the happiest delineation of its varieties, the liveliest effusions of wit and humour are conveyed to the world in the best chosen language.

  2. American Greetings Card:

    Life is a journey of sweetness and sorrow, of yesterday's memories and hopes for tomorrow, of pathways we choose and detours we face with patience and humour, courage and grace, of joys that we've shared and of people we've met who touched us in ways we will never forget.

  3. Mark Twain:

    The secret source of humour itself is not joy, but sorrow. There is no humour in heaven.

  4. Tom Carter:

    Whilst this damage may have been perpetrated for humour or some other reason, the actions that have been taken are unacceptable, the Long Man of Wilmington is protected by law as a Scheduled Ancient Monument for its historical significance.

  5. Montaigne:

    Books are pleasant, but if by being over-studious we impair our health and spoil our good humour, two of the best things we have, let us give it over. I, for my part, am one of those who think no fruit derived from them can recompense so great a loss.

Popularity rank by frequency of use

humour#10000#10304#100000

Translations for humour

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"humour." Definitions.net. STANDS4 LLC, 2024. Web. 25 Apr. 2024. <https://www.definitions.net/definition/humour>.

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