What does gumbo mean?

Definitions for gumbo
ˈgʌm boʊgum·bo

This dictionary definitions page includes all the possible meanings, example usage and translations of the word gumbo.

Princeton's WordNet

  1. gumbo, gumbo soilnoun

    any of various fine-grained silty soils that become waxy and very sticky mud when saturated with water

  2. okra, gumbo, okra plant, lady's-finger, Abelmoschus esculentus, Hibiscus esculentusnoun

    tall coarse annual of Old World tropics widely cultivated in southern United States and West Indies for its long mucilaginous green pods used as basis for soups and stews; sometimes placed in genus Hibiscus

  3. gumbo, okranoun

    long mucilaginous green pods; may be simmered or sauteed but used especially in soups and stews

  4. gumbonoun

    a soup or stew thickened with okra pods

Wiktionary

  1. gumbonoun

    The okra plant or its pods.

  2. gumbonoun

    A soup or stew made with okra.

  3. gumbonoun

    A fine silty soil that when wet becomes very thick and heavy.

  4. Etymology: ngombo, kingombo.\ Cognate to quiabo, Caribbean guingambó, and cognates in other Romance languages.

Wikipedia

  1. Gumbo

    Gumbo (Louisiana Creole: Gombo) is a soup popular in the U.S. state of Louisiana, and is the official state cuisine. Gumbo consists primarily of a strongly-flavored stock, meat or shellfish (or sometimes both), a thickener, and the Creole "holy trinity" ― celery, bell peppers, and onions. Gumbo is often categorized by the type of thickener used, whether okra or filé powder (dried and ground sassafras leaves). Gumbo can be made with or without okra or filé powder. The preferred method in the historical New Orleans variation is with a French dark roux. The flavor of the dish has its origins in many cultures. Creole gumbo generally contains shellfish, and a dark roux, filé, or both. Today, tomatoes are occasionally found in Creole gumbo and frequently appear in New Orleans cuisine but many gumbo cooks believe that tomatoes should never be used in gumbo. Cajun gumbo is generally based on a dark roux and is made with shellfish or fowl. Sausage or ham is often added to gumbos of either variety. After the base is prepared, vegetables are cooked down, and then meat is added. The dish simmers for a minimum of three hours, with shellfish and some spices added near the end. If desired, filé powder is added after the pot is removed from heat. Gumbo is traditionally served with rice. A third, lesser-known variety, the meatless gumbo z'herbes, is essentially a gumbo of slow-cooked greens. The dish combines ingredients and culinary practices of several cultures, including African, French, Spanish, and Native American Choctaw. Gumbo may have been based on traditional native dishes, or may be a derivation of the French dish bouillabaisse, or Choctaw stew, but most likely all of these dishes contributed to the original recipe. It was first described in 1802, and was listed in various cookbooks in the latter half of the 19th century. The dish gained more widespread popularity in the 1970s, after the United States Senate dining room added it to the menu in honor of Louisiana Senator Allen Ellender. The popularity of chef Paul Prudhomme in the 1980s spurred further interest in the dish.

ChatGPT

  1. gumbo

    Gumbo is a traditional Louisiana soup or stew, heavily influenced by African, French, Spanish and Native American cooking. It typically contains a mixture of vegetables such as bell peppers, celery, and onions, a variety of meats or shellfish such as chicken, sausage, shrimp, or crab, and is thickened with okra, file powder, or a dark roux. It is usually served over rice.

Webster Dictionary

  1. Gumbonoun

    a soup thickened with the mucilaginous pods of the okra; okra soup

  2. Gumbonoun

    the okra plant or its pods

  3. Etymology: [Written also gombo.]

Wikidata

  1. Gumbo

    Gumbo is a dish that originated in southern Louisiana during the 18th century. It typically consists primarily of a strongly-flavored stock, meat or shellfish, a thickener, and seasoning vegetables, which can include celery, bell peppers and onions. Gumbo is often categorized by the type of thickener used: the African vegetable okra, the Choctaw spice filé powder, or roux, the French base made of flour and fat. The dish likely derived its name from either the Bantu word for okra or the Choctaw word for filé. Several different varieties exist. In New Orleans, what is known as Creole gumbo generally contains shellfish. Cajun gumbo varies greatly, but often has a dark roux with either shellfish or fowl, but not together. The Creoles of Cane River make a gumbo focused much more on filé. After the base is prepared, vegetables are cooked down, and then meat is added. The dish simmers, with shellfish and some spices added near the end. Gumbo is traditionally served over rice. The dish combines ingredients and culinary practices of several cultures, including West African, French, Spanish, German, and Choctaw. Gumbo may have been based on traditional West African or native dishes, or may be a derivation of the French dish bouillabaisse. It was first described in 1802, and was listed in various cookbooks in the latter half of the 19th century. The dish gained more widespread popularity in the 1970s, after the United States Senate cafeteria added it to the menu in honor of Louisiana Senator Allen Ellender. The popularity of chef Justin Wilson in the '70s spurred further interest in gumbo. The dish is the official cuisine of the state of Louisiana.

Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

  1. Gumbo

    gum′bō, n. the okra or its mucilaginous pods: a soup of which okra is an ingredient, also a dish of okra-pods seasoned: Creole patois in Louisiana.

Editors Contribution

  1. Gumbo

    A thick homemade soup originated in Southern Louisiana


    Submitted by JP03 on September 9, 2014  

Suggested Resources

  1. gumbo

    Song lyrics by gumbo -- Explore a large variety of song lyrics performed by gumbo on the Lyrics.com website.

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Numerology

  1. Chaldean Numerology

    The numerical value of gumbo in Chaldean Numerology is: 4

  2. Pythagorean Numerology

    The numerical value of gumbo in Pythagorean Numerology is: 4

Examples of gumbo in a Sentence

  1. Emily Mirowski:

    Gumbo Limbo Nature Center was weak and emaciated. I could just tell Gumbo Limbo Nature Center wasn't doing well.

  2. Emily Mirowski:

    Gumbo Limbo Nature Center was really heartbreaking, but it's something we've seen for several years and we're just glad people are finally seeing this image and hopefully it's raising awareness.

  3. Leah Chase:

    Nobody bothered them once they were in here. The police never, ever bothered us here, so they would meet and they would plan to go out, do what they had to do, come back -- all over a bowl of gumbo and some fried chicken.

  4. Commander Phil Robertson:

    My qualifications for president of the United States are rather narrow: Is he or she Godly, does he or she love us, can he or she do the job, and finally would they kill a duck and put him in a pot and make him a good duck gumbo? cruz fits the bill.

Popularity rank by frequency of use

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Translations for gumbo

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"gumbo." Definitions.net. STANDS4 LLC, 2024. Web. 19 May 2024. <https://www.definitions.net/definition/gumbo>.

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