What does fugitive mean?

Definitions for fugitive
ˈfyu dʒɪ tɪvfugi·tive

This dictionary definitions page includes all the possible meanings, example usage and translations of the word fugitive.

Princeton's WordNet

  1. fugitive, runaway, fleernoun

    someone who flees from an uncongenial situation

    "fugitives from the sweatshops"

  2. fugitive, fugitive from justiceadjective

    someone who is sought by law officers; someone trying to elude justice

  3. fleeting, fugitive, momentaneous, momentaryadjective

    lasting for a markedly brief time

    "a fleeting glance"; "fugitive hours"; "rapid momentaneous association of things that meet and pass"; "a momentary glimpse"

Wiktionary

  1. fugitivenoun

    (often followed by "from") a person who is fleeing or escaping from something

    John was a fugitive

  2. fugitiveadjective

    fleeing or running away

  3. fugitiveadjective

    transient, fleeting or ephemeral

  4. fugitiveadjective

    elusive or difficult to retain

  5. Etymology: From fugitif.

Samuel Johnson's Dictionary

  1. FUGITIVEadjective

    Etymology: fugitif, French; fugitivus, Latin.

    Our ideas of infinity is a growing and fugitive idea, still in a boundless progression, that can stop no where. John Locke.

    Happiness, object of that waking dream,
    Which we call life, mistaking: fugitive theme
    Of my pursuing verse, ideal shade,
    Notional good, by fancy only made. Matthew Prior.

    The more tender and fugitive parts, the leaves, of many of the more sturdy vegetables, fall off for want of the supply from beneath: those only which are more tenacious, making a shift to subsist without such recruit. John Woodward, Nat. History.

    Whilst yet with Parthian blood thy sword is warm,
    The fugitive Parthians follow. William Shakespeare, Ant. and Cleopatra.

    The Trojan chief
    Thrice fugitive about Troy wall. John Milton.

    Can a fugitive daughter enjoy herself, while her parents are in tears? Clarissa.

    It was the most malicious surmise that had ever been brewed, howsoever countenanced by a libellous pamphlet of a fugitive physician. Henry Wotton.

  2. Fugitivenoun

    Etymology: from the adjective.

    Unmarried men are best friends, best masters, best servants, but not always best subjects; for they are light to run away, and almost all fugitives are of that condition. Francis Bacon, Essay 8.

    Back to thy punishment,
    False fugitive! and to thy speed add wings,
    Lest with a whip of scorpions I pursue
    Thy ling’ring. John Milton, Paradise Lost, b. ii.

    We understand by some fugitives that he hath commanded
    The generals to return with victory, or expect
    A shameful death. John Denham, Sophy.

    There are also in this realm of England too many, which, being men of good inheritance, are fled beyond the seas, where they live under princes which are her majesty’s professed enemies; and converse and are confederates with other traytors and fugitives, which are there abiding. Edmund Spenser, on Ireland.

    Your royal highness is too great and too just a monarch either to want or to receive the homage of rebellious fugitives. Dryden.

Wikipedia

  1. Fugitive

    A fugitive (or runaway) is a person who is fleeing from custody, whether it be from jail, a government arrest, government or non-government questioning, vigilante violence, or outraged private individuals. A fugitive from justice, also known as a wanted person, can be a person who is either convicted or accused of a crime and hiding from law enforcement in the state or taking refuge in a different country in order to avoid arrest.A fugitive from justice alternatively has been defined as a person formally charged with a crime or a convicted criminal whose punishment has not yet been determined or fully served who is currently beyond the custody or control of the national or sub-national government or international criminal tribunal with an interest in their arrest. This latter definition adopts the perspective of the pursuing government or tribunal, recognizing that the charged (versus escaped) individual does not necessarily realize that they are officially a wanted person (e.g., due to a case of mistaken identity or reliance on a sealed indictment), and therefore may not be fleeing, hiding, or taking refuge to avoid arrest. The fugitive from justice is ‘international’ (versus ‘domestic’) if wanted by law enforcement authorities across a national border.Interpol is the international organization with no legal authority to directly pursue or detain fugitives of any kind. Europol is the European authority for the pursuit of fugitives who are on the run within Europe, and coordinates their search, while national authorities in the probable country of their stay coordinate their arrest. In the United States, the U.S. Marshals Service is the primary law enforcement agency that tracks down federal fugitives, though the Federal Bureau of Investigation also tracks fugitives. As a verbal metaphor and psychological concept, one might also be described as a "fugitive from oneself". The literary sense of "fugitive" includes the meaning of simply "fleeing". In many jurisdictions, a fugitive who flees custody while a trial is underway loses the right to appeal any convictions or sentences imposed on him, since the act of fleeing is deemed to flout the court's authority. In 2003, convicted rapist Andrew Luster had his appeals denied on the basis that he spent six months as a fugitive (he was convicted in absentia).

ChatGPT

  1. fugitive

    A fugitive is a person who has escaped from a place or is in hiding, especially to avoid arrest or prosecution. Typically, this term refers to individuals evading law enforcement after committing a crime, or those avoiding imprisonment after a conviction. It can also apply to someone fleeing from any form of imposed constraints.

Webster Dictionary

  1. Fugitiveadjective

    fleeing from pursuit, danger, restraint, etc., escaping, from service, duty etc.; as, a fugitive solder; a fugitive slave; a fugitive debtor

  2. Fugitiveadjective

    not fixed; not durable; liable to disappear or fall away; volatile; uncertain; evanescent; liable to fade; -- applied to material and immaterial things; as, fugitive colors; a fugitive idea

  3. Fugitivenoun

    one who flees from pursuit, danger, restraint, service, duty, etc.; a deserter; as, a fugitive from justice

  4. Fugitivenoun

    something hard to be caught or detained

Wikidata

  1. Fugitive

    A fugitive is a person who is fleeing from custody, whether it be from jail, a government arrest, government or non-government questioning, vigilante violence, or outraged private individuals. A fugitive from justice, also known as a wanted person can either be a person convicted or accused of a crime, who is hiding from law enforcement in the state or taking refuge in a different country in order to avoid arrest in another country. Interpol is the international authority for the pursuit of trans-border fugitives. Europol is the European authority for the pursuit of fugitives who are on the run within Europe, and coordinates their search, while national authorities in the probable country of their stay coordinate their arrest. In the United States, the U.S. Marshals Service is the primary law enforcement agency that tracks down federal fugitives, though the Federal Bureau of Investigation also tracks fugitives. As a verbal metaphor and psychological concept, one might also be described as a "fugitive from oneself". Finally, the literary sense of "fugitive" includes the meaning of simply "fleeing". In many jurisdictions, a fugitive loses the right to appeal any convictions or sentences imposed on him, since the act of fleeing is deemed to flout the court's authority. Recently, convicted rapist Andrew Luster had his appeals denied on the basis that he spent six years as a fugitive.

Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

  1. Fugitive

    fūj′i-tiv, adj. apt to flee away: uncertain: volatile: perishable: temporary: occasional, written for some passing occasion.—n. one who flees or has fled from his station or country: one hard to be caught.—ns. Fū′gie (Scot.), a cock that will not fight, a runaway; Fū′gie-warr′ant, a warrant to apprehend a debtor about to abscond, prob. from the phrase in meditatione fugæ; Fugitā′tion (Scots law), absconding from justice: outlawry.—adv. Fug′itively.—n. Fug′itiveness. [Fr.,—L. fugitivus, fugĕre, to flee.]

Military Dictionary and Gazetteer

  1. fugitive

    One who flees from his station or duty; a deserter; one who flees from danger. One who has fled or deserted and taken refuge under another power, or one who has fled from punishment.

Entomology

  1. Fugitive

    soon disappearing; not permanent.

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Numerology

  1. Chaldean Numerology

    The numerical value of fugitive in Chaldean Numerology is: 7

  2. Pythagorean Numerology

    The numerical value of fugitive in Pythagorean Numerology is: 9

Examples of fugitive in a Sentence

  1. Matthew Albence:

    Simply put, there are only so many resources to go around, we've had some places where, for months at a time, fugitive operations teams were shut down.

  2. Aisha Elliott:

    I have to disagree, being a fugitive doesn't always end in capture.

  3. Joey Jackson:

    You need some type of aiding or abetting or assisting or material support ... of a fugitive.

  4. Jami Caesar:

    Someone who is being described as a fugitive is someone who is supposed to be captured.

  5. Mayor Dyer:

    If there is a fugitive in a crowd…if we can use facial recognition to spot them in a crowd.

Popularity rank by frequency of use

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Translations for fugitive

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"fugitive." Definitions.net. STANDS4 LLC, 2024. Web. 22 Jun 2024. <https://www.definitions.net/definition/fugitive>.

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