What does forgiveness mean?

Definitions for forgiveness
fərˈgɪv nɪsfor·give·ness

This dictionary definitions page includes all the possible meanings, example usage and translations of the word forgiveness.

Princeton's WordNet

  1. forgivenessnoun

    compassionate feelings that support a willingness to forgive

  2. forgiveness, pardonnoun

    the act of excusing a mistake or offense

Wiktionary

  1. forgivenessnoun

    The action of forgiving.

  2. forgivenessnoun

    Readiness to forgive.

  3. Etymology: From forgiven + -ness.

Samuel Johnson's Dictionary

  1. Forgivenessnoun

    Etymology: forgifennisse, Saxon.

    To the Lord our God belong mercies and forgivenesses. Dan.

    Thou hast promised repentance and forgiveness to them that have sinned against thee. Prayer of Manass.

    Exchange forgiveness with me, noble Hamlet;
    Mine and my father’s death come not on thee,
    Nor thine on me. William Shakespeare, Hamlet.

    Forgiveness to the injur’d does belong;
    But they ne’er pardon who commit the wrong. Dryden.

    God has certainly promised forgiveness of sin to every one who repents. Robert South, Sermons.

    Here are introduced more heroick principles of meekness, forgiveness, bounty and magnanimity, than all the learning of the heathens could invent. Thomas Sprat, Sermons.

    Mercy above did hourly plead
    For her resemblance here below;
    And mild forgiveness intercede
    To stop the coming blow. Dryden.

Wikipedia

  1. Forgiveness

    Forgiveness, in a psychological sense, is the intentional and voluntary process by which one who may initially feel victimized or wronged, goes through a change in feelings and attitude regarding a given offender, and overcomes the impact of the offense including negative emotions such as resentment and a desire for vengeance (however justified it might be). Theorists differ, however, in the extent to which they believe forgiveness also implies replacing the negative emotions with positive attitudes (i.e. an increased ability to tolerate the offender). In certain legal contexts, forgiveness is a term for absolving or giving up all claims on account of debt, loan, obligation, or other claims.On the psychological level, forgiveness is different from simple condoning (viewing an action as harmful, yet to be “forgiven” or overlooked for certain reasons of “charity”), excusing or pardoning (merely releasing the offender from responsibility for an action), or forgetting (attempting to somehow remove from one's conscious mind, the memory of a given “offense"). In some schools of thought, it involves a personal and "voluntary" effort at the self-transformation of one's own half of a relationship with another, such that one's own self is restored to peace and ideally to what psychologist Carl Rogers has referred to as “unconditional positive regard” towards the other.As a psychological concept and virtue, the benefits of forgiveness have been explored in religious thought, social sciences and medicine. Forgiveness may be considered simply in terms of the person who forgives including forgiving themselves, in terms of the person forgiven or in terms of the relationship between the forgiver and the person forgiven. In most contexts, forgiveness is granted without any expectation of restorative justice, and without any response on the part of the offender (for example, one may forgive a person who is incommunicado or dead). In practical terms, it may be necessary for the offender to offer some form of acknowledgment, an apology, or even just ask for forgiveness, in order for the wronged person to believe themselves able to forgive as well.Social and political dimensions of forgiveness involves the strictly private and religious sphere of "forgiveness". The notion of "forgiveness" is generally considered unusual in the political field. However, Hannah Arendt considers that the "faculty of forgiveness" has its place in public affairs. The philosopher believes that forgiveness can liberate resources both individually and collectively in the face of the irreparable. During an investigation in Rwanda on the discourses and practices of forgiveness after the 1994 genocide, sociologist Benoit Guillou illustrated the extreme polysemy (multiple meanings) of the word "forgiveness" but also the eminently political character of the notion. By way of conclusion of his work, the author proposes four main figures of forgiveness to better understand, on the one hand, ambiguous uses and, on the other hand, the conditions under which forgiveness can mediate a resumption of social link.Most world religions include teachings on the nature of forgiveness, and many of these teachings provide an underlying basis for many varying modern day traditions and practices of forgiveness. Some religious doctrines or philosophies place greater emphasis on the need for humans to find some sort of divine forgiveness for their own shortcomings, others place greater emphasis on the need for humans to practice forgiveness of one another, yet others make little or no distinction between human and divine forgiveness. The term forgiveness can be used interchangeably and is interpreted many different ways by people and cultures. This is specifically important in relational communication because forgiveness is a key component in communication and the overall progression as an individual and couple or group. When all parties have a mutual viewing for forgiveness then a relationship can be maintained. "Understanding antecedents of forgiveness, exploring the physiology of forgiveness, and training people to become more forgiving all imply that we have a shared meaning for the term".

ChatGPT

  1. forgiveness

    Forgiveness is the intentional and voluntary process by an individual to let go of feelings of resentment or vengeance towards someone who has harmed them, regardless of whether they actually deserve forgiveness or not. It is a conscious decision to release feelings of negativity and to move forward without holding onto grudges. Forgiveness does not mean forgetting wrongdoings, nor does it necessarily involve reconciliation with the person who caused the harm.

Webster Dictionary

  1. Forgivenessnoun

    the act of forgiving; the state of being forgiven; as, the forgiveness of sin or of injuries

  2. Forgivenessnoun

    disposition to pardon; willingness to forgive

Wikidata

  1. Forgiveness

    Forgiveness is the renunciation or cessation of resentment, indignation or anger as a result of a perceived offence, disagreement, or mistake, or ceasing to demand punishment or restitution. The Oxford English Dictionary defines forgiveness as 'to grant free pardon and to give up all claim on account of an offence or debt'. The concept and benefits of forgiveness have been explored in religious thought, the social sciences and medicine. Forgiveness may be considered simply in terms of the person who forgives including forgiving themselves, in terms of the person forgiven or in terms of the relationship between the forgiver and the person forgiven. In most contexts, forgiveness is granted without any expectation of restorative justice, and without any response on the part of the offender. In practical terms, it may be necessary for the offender to offer some form of acknowledgment, an apology, or even just ask for forgiveness, in order for the wronged person to believe himself able to forgive. Most world religions include teachings on the nature of forgiveness, and many of these teachings provide an underlying basis for many varying modern day traditions and practices of forgiveness. Some religious doctrines or philosophies place greater emphasis on the need for humans to find some sort of divine forgiveness for their own shortcomings, others place greater emphasis on the need for humans to practice forgiveness of one another, yet others make little or no distinction between human and divine forgiveness.

Editors Contribution

  1. forgiveness

    The act and fact of to forgive.

    Their forgiveness empowered the creation of peace, unity, love and understanding, optimum health and shared prosperity for all.


    Submitted by MaryC on April 4, 2020  

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Numerology

  1. Chaldean Numerology

    The numerical value of forgiveness in Chaldean Numerology is: 3

  2. Pythagorean Numerology

    The numerical value of forgiveness in Pythagorean Numerology is: 4

Examples of forgiveness in a Sentence

  1. Serena Williams:

    No matter what, my sister is not coming back for good behavior, it’s unfair that she’ll never have an opportunity to hug me. But also…The Bible talks about forgiveness.

  2. Tyler Perry:

    The Passion is about love, inclusion and compassion for all mankind, it's for believers and also nonbelievers. It's for all faiths and all backgrounds. This story doesn't just belong to one group, it belongs to humanity. Love, forgiveness and compassion, those are things that are universal to us all.

  3. David Cassato:

    I went over and spoke to the students in the school about what happened, telling them that hate never wins, we are, and must be, a community that continues to share the message of Easter, that which is of love, hope, and forgiveness.

  4. David Vitter:

    Fifteen years ago, I failed my family -- but found forgiveness and love. I learned that our falls don't define us, but rather how we get up, accept responsibility and earn redemption, you know me, I'm a fighter.

  5. Debasish Mridha, M.D.:

    I always win in every fight; my secret weapons are my kindness and forgiveness.

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Translations for forgiveness

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"forgiveness." Definitions.net. STANDS4 LLC, 2024. Web. 25 Apr. 2024. <https://www.definitions.net/definition/forgiveness>.

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