What does flood mean?

Definitions for flood
flʌdflood

Here are all the possible meanings and translations of the word flood.

Princeton's WordNet

  1. flood, inundation, deluge, alluvion(noun)

    the rising of a body of water and its overflowing onto normally dry land

    "plains fertilized by annual inundations"

  2. flood, inundation, deluge, torrent(noun)

    an overwhelming number or amount

    "a flood of requests"; "a torrent of abuse"

  3. flood, floodlight, flood lamp, photoflood(noun)

    light that is a source of artificial illumination having a broad beam; used in photography

  4. flood, overflow, outpouring(noun)

    a large flow

  5. flood, flowage(noun)

    the act of flooding; filling to overflowing

  6. flood tide, flood, rising tide(verb)

    the occurrence of incoming water (between a low tide and the following high tide)

    "a tide in the affairs of men which, taken at the flood, leads on to fortune" -Shakespeare

  7. deluge, flood, inundate, swamp(verb)

    fill quickly beyond capacity; as with a liquid

    "the basement was inundated after the storm"; "The images flooded his mind"

  8. flood(verb)

    cover with liquid, usually water

    "The swollen river flooded the village"; "The broken vein had flooded blood in her eyes"

  9. flood, oversupply, glut(verb)

    supply with an excess of

    "flood the market with tennis shoes"; "Glut the country with cheap imports from the Orient"

  10. flood(verb)

    become filled to overflowing

    "Our basement flooded during the heavy rains"

Wiktionary

  1. flood(Noun)

    A (usually disastrous) overflow of water from a lake or other body of water due to excessive rainfall or other input of water.

    Etymology: flod, from flod, from common Germanic *flōduz, from Proto-Indo-European *plō-tu-, derived from *pleu- "to flow". Near cognates include Flut and Gothic (flōdus).

  2. flood(Noun)

    A large number or quantity of anything appearing more rapidly than can easily be dealt with.

    Etymology: flod, from flod, from common Germanic *flōduz, from Proto-Indo-European *plō-tu-, derived from *pleu- "to flow". Near cognates include Flut and Gothic (flōdus).

  3. flood(Noun)

    A floodlight

    Etymology: flod, from flod, from common Germanic *flōduz, from Proto-Indo-European *plō-tu-, derived from *pleu- "to flow". Near cognates include Flut and Gothic (flōdus).

  4. flood(Verb)

    To overflow.

    Etymology: flod, from flod, from common Germanic *flōduz, from Proto-Indo-European *plō-tu-, derived from *pleu- "to flow". Near cognates include Flut and Gothic (flōdus).

  5. flood(Verb)

    To cover or partly fill as if by a flood.

    Etymology: flod, from flod, from common Germanic *flōduz, from Proto-Indo-European *plō-tu-, derived from *pleu- "to flow". Near cognates include Flut and Gothic (flōdus).

  6. flood(Verb)

    To provide (someone or something) with a larger number or quantity of something than cannot easily be dealt with.

    The station's switchboard was flooded with listeners making complaints.

    Etymology: flod, from flod, from common Germanic *flōduz, from Proto-Indo-European *plō-tu-, derived from *pleu- "to flow". Near cognates include Flut and Gothic (flōdus).

  7. flood(Verb)

    To paste numerous lines of text to a chat system in order to disrupt the conversation.

    Etymology: flod, from flod, from common Germanic *flōduz, from Proto-Indo-European *plō-tu-, derived from *pleu- "to flow". Near cognates include Flut and Gothic (flōdus).

  8. Flood(ProperNoun)

    The flood referred to in the Book of Genesis in the Old Testament.

    Etymology: flod, from flod, from common Germanic *flōduz, from Proto-Indo-European *plō-tu-, derived from *pleu- "to flow". Near cognates include Flut and Gothic (flōdus).

Webster Dictionary

  1. Flood(verb)

    a great flow of water; a body of moving water; the flowing stream, as of a river; especially, a body of water, rising, swelling, and overflowing land not usually thus covered; a deluge; a freshet; an inundation

    Etymology: [OE. flod a flowing, stream, flood, AS. fld; akin to D. vloed, OS. fld, OHG. fluot, G. flut, Icel. fl, Sw. & Dan. flod, Goth. fldus; from the root of E. flow. 80. See Flow, v. i.]

  2. Flood(verb)

    the flowing in of the tide; the semidiurnal swell or rise of water in the ocean; -- opposed to ebb; as, young flood; high flood

    Etymology: [OE. flod a flowing, stream, flood, AS. fld; akin to D. vloed, OS. fld, OHG. fluot, G. flut, Icel. fl, Sw. & Dan. flod, Goth. fldus; from the root of E. flow. 80. See Flow, v. i.]

  3. Flood(verb)

    a great flow or stream of any fluid substance; as, a flood of light; a flood of lava; hence, a great quantity widely diffused; an overflowing; a superabundance; as, a flood of bank notes; a flood of paper currency

    Etymology: [OE. flod a flowing, stream, flood, AS. fld; akin to D. vloed, OS. fld, OHG. fluot, G. flut, Icel. fl, Sw. & Dan. flod, Goth. fldus; from the root of E. flow. 80. See Flow, v. i.]

  4. Flood(verb)

    menstrual disharge; menses

    Etymology: [OE. flod a flowing, stream, flood, AS. fld; akin to D. vloed, OS. fld, OHG. fluot, G. flut, Icel. fl, Sw. & Dan. flod, Goth. fldus; from the root of E. flow. 80. See Flow, v. i.]

  5. Flood(verb)

    to overflow; to inundate; to deluge; as, the swollen river flooded the valley

    Etymology: [OE. flod a flowing, stream, flood, AS. fld; akin to D. vloed, OS. fld, OHG. fluot, G. flut, Icel. fl, Sw. & Dan. flod, Goth. fldus; from the root of E. flow. 80. See Flow, v. i.]

  6. Flood(verb)

    to cause or permit to be inundated; to fill or cover with water or other fluid; as, to flood arable land for irrigation; to fill to excess or to its full capacity; as, to flood a country with a depreciated currency

    Etymology: [OE. flod a flowing, stream, flood, AS. fld; akin to D. vloed, OS. fld, OHG. fluot, G. flut, Icel. fl, Sw. & Dan. flod, Goth. fldus; from the root of E. flow. 80. See Flow, v. i.]

Freebase

  1. Flood

    A flood is an overflow of water that submerges land which is normally dry. The European Union Floods Directive defines a flood as a covering by water of land not normally covered by water. In the sense of "flowing water", the word may also be applied to the inflow of the tide. Flooding may occur as an overflow of water from water bodies, such as a river or lake, in which the water overtops or breaks levees, resulting in some of that water escaping its usual boundaries, or it may occur due to an accumulation of rainwater on saturated ground in an areal flood. While the size of a lake or other body of water will vary with seasonal changes in precipitation and snow melt, these changes in size are unlikely to be considered significant unless they flood property or drown domestic animals. Floods can also occur in rivers when the flow rate exceeds the capacity of the river channel, particularly at bends or meanders in the waterway. Floods often cause damage to homes and businesses if they are in the natural flood plains of rivers. While riverine flood damage can be eliminated by moving away from rivers and other bodies of water, people have traditionally lived and worked by rivers because the land is usually flat and fertile and because rivers provide easy travel and access to commerce and industry.

Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

  1. Flood

    flud, n. a great flow of water: (B.) a river: an inundation: a deluge: the rise or flow of the tide: any great quantity.—v.t. to overflow: to inundate: to bleed profusely, as after parturition:—pr.p. flood′ing; pa.p. flood′ed.ns. Flood′-gate, a gate for letting water flow through, or to prevent it: an opening or passage: an obstruction; Flood′ing, an extraordinary flow of blood from the uterus; Flood′mark, the mark or line to which the tide rises; Flood′-tide, the rising or inflowing tide.—The Flood, the deluge in the days of Noah. [A.S. flód; Dut. vloed, Ger. fluth. Cog. with flow.]

The New Hacker's Dictionary

  1. flood

    [common] 1. To overwhelm a network channel with mechanically-generated traffic; especially used of IP, TCP/IP, UDP, or ICMP denial-of-service attacks. 2. To dump large amounts of text onto an IRC channel. This is especially rude when the text is uninteresting and the other users are trying to carry on a serious conversation. Also used in a similar sense on Usenet. 3. [Usenet] To post an unusually large number or volume of files on a related topic.

Rap Dictionary

  1. flood(noun)

    A disrespectful word for a blood. Nigga you is a flood go suck a dick and be a fag like Slick Rick -- Trama (Fu** Scrappy)

Suggested Resources

  1. flood

    Song lyrics by flood -- Explore a large variety of song lyrics performed by flood on the Lyrics.com website.

British National Corpus

  1. Nouns Frequency

    Rank popularity for the word 'flood' in Nouns Frequency: #2209

  2. Verbs Frequency

    Rank popularity for the word 'flood' in Verbs Frequency: #944

How to pronounce flood?

  1. Alex
    Alex
    US English
    Daniel
    Daniel
    British
    Karen
    Karen
    Australian
    Veena
    Veena
    Indian

How to say flood in sign language?

  1. flood

Numerology

  1. Chaldean Numerology

    The numerical value of flood in Chaldean Numerology is: 2

  2. Pythagorean Numerology

    The numerical value of flood in Pythagorean Numerology is: 7

Examples of flood in a Sentence

  1. Jami Mitchell:

    We've had some families that have had up to six dogs that were loaded on an air boat at the same time as the families being evacuated from flood waters.

  2. Roy Cooper:

    This storm isn't yet over. I'm urging people to keep a close eye on forecasts and flood watches, and asking drivers to use caution especially when traveling in our western counties.

  3. Betsey Hazard:

    It's really the river that has us worried, they say that the river won't flood in New Orleans, but we have a 5-year-old and a 10-month-old, and we don't want to take any chances.

  4. William Butler Yeats:

    You shall go with me, newly-married bride,And gaze upon a merrier multitude.White-armed Nuala, Aengus of the Birds,Feachra of the hurtling form, and himWho is the ruler of the Western Host,Finvara, and their Land of Heart's Desire.Where beauty has no ebb, decay no flood,But joy is wisdom, time an endless song.

  5. Columbia Gas:

    Shoemaker said.Lastly, after Columbia Gas is sold, an independent monitor chosen by the U.S. Department of Transportation will monitor a new companys activities to ensure compliance with state and federal safety regulations and report it to the government on a monthly basis. NiSource also has subsidiaries in Indiana, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Maryland, Kentucky and Virginia. As per a separate agreement, it will implement the recommendations made by the national transportation safety board in the wake of the gas explosions in Massachusetts two years ago. SUPREME COURT HEARS ATLANTIC COAST PIPELINE CASE, ROBERTS WARNS OF IMPERMEABLE BARRIER ALONG APPALACHIAN TRAIL Columbia Gas, through a pattern of flagrant indifference, in the face of extreme risk to life and property, knowingly violated minimum safety standards for starting up and shutting down gas pipelines, Shoemaker said. Federal investigators blamed the explosions on over-pressurized gas lines, saying the company failed to account for critical pressure sensors as workers replaced century-old cast-iron pipes in Lawrence. That omission caused high-pressure gas to flood the neighborhoods distribution system at excessive levels. Todays resolution with the U.S. Attorneys Office is an important part of addressing the impact.

Images & Illustrations of flood

  1. floodfloodfloodfloodflood

Popularity rank by frequency of use

flood#1#4817#10000

Translations for flood

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    the largest tarsal bone; forms the human heel
    • A. ventricle
    • B. flunkey
    • C. calcaneus
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